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Psychotic experiences and accidents, injuries, and poisonings among adults in the United States
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain / ICREA, Barcelona, Spain.
Fordham University, New York, NY, USA.
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2019 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 282, article id 112610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychotic experiences (PEs) have been linked to an increased risk for accidents and injuries. However, this association remains little researched in many countries. To address this research gap, the current study used cross-sectional data from the United States to examine the association between PEs and accidents, injuries, and poisoning in a general population sample. Data were analyzed from 2274 individuals who completed the psychosis screen as part of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Information was obtained on PEs (hallucinations and delusions) and the experience of past 12-month accidents, injuries, and poisoning. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association while adjusting for demographic variables and common mental disorders (CMDs). In a fully adjusted model past 12-month PEs were associated with almost three times higher odds for reporting accidents, injuries, and poisoning (odds ratio [OR]: 2.97, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-7.74). The results of this study indicate that PEs are associated with higher odds for accidents and injuries among adults in the United States. Research is now needed to determine the direction of this association and the factors linked to it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 282, article id 112610
Keywords [en]
Accident, Delusion, Hallucination, Injury, NCS-R
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39292DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2019.112610PubMedID: 31655406Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85073687414OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-39292DiVA, id: diva2:1367426
Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew

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