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Physical injury and psychotic experiences in 48 low- and middle-income countries
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
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2019 (English)In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Psychotic experiences (PEs) may be associated with injuries, but studies focusing specifically on low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs) are scarce. Thus, the current study examined the link between injuries and PEs in a large number of LAMICs.

METHOD: Cross-sectional data were used from 242 952 individuals in 48 LAMICs that were collected during the World Health Survey in 2002-2004 to examine the association between traffic-related and other (non-traffic-related) forms of injury and PEs. Multivariable logistic regression analysis and meta-analysis were used to examine associations while controlling for a variety of covariates including depression.

RESULTS: In fully adjusted analyses, any injury [odds ratio (OR) 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.85-2.31], traffic injury (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.53-2.21) and other injury (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.84-2.37) were associated with higher odds for PEs. Results from a country-wise analysis showed that any injury was associated with significantly increased odds for PEs in 39 countries with the overall pooled OR estimated by meta-analysis being 2.46 (95% CI 2.22-2.74) with a moderate level of between-country heterogeneity (I2 = 56.3%). Similar results were observed across all country income levels (low, lower-middle and upper-middle).

CONCLUSIONS: Different types of injury are associated with PEs in LAMICs. Improving mental health systems and trauma capacity in LAMICs may be important for preventing injury-related negative mental health outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2019. p. 1-8
Keywords [en]
Delusion, World Health Survey, epidemiology, hallucination, injuries
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39291DOI: 10.1017/S0033291719002897PubMedID: 31637996Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85074060566OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-39291DiVA, id: diva2:1367422
Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved

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