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Factors associated with improving diet and physical activity among persons with excess body weight
National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9488-887X
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4453-4760
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, article id ckz170Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: As overweight and obesity are highly prevalent in Eastern Europe, the study examined the trends and factors associated with self-reported weight reducing behaviours among individuals with excess body weight in Estonia.

METHODS: Study used nationally representative cross-sectional data from 2006 to 2016 including 4302 men and 3627 women aged 20-64 years with excess body weight (BMI ≥ 25). Trends in the prevalence of changing eating habits and physical activity and their sociodemographic and health-related correlates were studied using descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS: Among overweight or obese respondents, 41% of men and 48% of women reported improvements in dietary habits and 19% of men and women reported increase in physical activity during the past 12 months in 2016. Positive trend for 2006-2016 regarding both outcomes was observed for men whereas no statistically significant differences were found for women. Women and those with lower than tertiary education had higher odds for reporting change in eating habits whereas older age and smoking or excessive alcohol consumption reduced the odds. Improvement in physical activity was more likely among younger respondents, women, ethnic Estonians and those with tertiary education, whereas poorer health and smoking reduced the odds. Weight-related advice from health professionals or family had strong effect on both outcomes.

CONCLUSION: Socio-demographic and health profiles differentiate the self-reported behavioural change among persons with excess body weight. Advice from either health professionals or family may have a potential to facilitate positive changes in eating habits and physical activity among those individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Public Health Association , 2019. article id ckz170
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39172DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckz170PubMedID: 31544930OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-39172DiVA, id: diva2:1366933
Available from: 2019-10-31 Created: 2019-10-31 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved

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Leinsalu, Mall

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
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