sh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Conflict as a point of no return: Immigrant and internally displaced journalists in Ukraine
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Journalism.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7943-3076
2019 (English)In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The Ukrainian Euromaidan protests in 2013, alongside the Brexit vote and the so-called ‘refugee crisis’, have strongly changed the imaginary of Europe. Apart from ideological shifts and geopolitical changes, the situation in Ukraine has led to a geographic relocation and displacement of media producers and audiences alike. Yet, in the Ukrainian context and beyond, little is known about dislocated journalists in conflict situations. This article addresses the specific experiences of immigrant and internally displaced journalists, their imagined audiences and the overarching construction of post-revolutionary Ukraine as an imagined community. The argument draws empirically from the dislocatory experiences and relocatory trajectories of two groups: immigrant journalists, who moved to Ukraine from Russia, and journalists who migrated internally – to Kyiv and other government-controlled Ukrainian regions from Crimea and non-government-controlled areas of Donbas. For immigrant and internally displaced journalists, the search for new identities and positions is strongly related to their imagination of the audiences. The journalists notice a simultaneous fragmentation and unification of the audiences driven by both top-down and down-up intentions of post-revolutionary nation building. They hope to contribute to turning the fragmented communities into a media nation that will perceive them as ‘us’.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019.
Keywords [en]
Imagined audience, imagined community, immigrant, internally displaced, journalists, Ukraine
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies; Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38934DOI: 10.1177/1367549419869351ISI: 000485370000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85073924216OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-38934DiVA, id: diva2:1349945
Part of project
Propaganda and management of information in the Ukraine-Russia conflict: From nation branding to information war, The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 3033701
Note

Published ahead of print on September 9, 2019

Available from: 2019-09-10 Created: 2019-09-10 Last updated: 2019-11-04Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Voronova, Liudmila

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Voronova, Liudmila
By organisation
Journalism
In the same journal
European Journal of Cultural Studies
Media Studies

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf