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Self-reported asthma diagnosis and mental health: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication
University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
University of California, La Jolla, USA.
Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain / Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9565-5004
2019 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 271, p. 721-725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historically, asthma has had a mixed association with mental health. More research is needed to examine the associations between asthma and specific psychiatric disorders, and whether these associations hold true across racial groups in the general population of the United States. Using the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys, we examined the associations between lifetime asthma and specific DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics and smoking status. We found that when looking at the entire sample, self-reported diagnosis of asthma was associated with greater odds of reporting mood disorders (AOR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.05-1.74). Asthma was not significantly associated with total anxiety disorders (AOR 1.25; 95% CI: 0.98-1.60), though it was specifically associated with generalized anxiety disorder. Asthma was associated with greater odds of having alcohol use disorders (AOR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.24-2.37), but was not associated with total eating disorders (AOR:1.36; 95% CI: 1.17-2.51) (though it was significantly associated with higher odds for binge eating disorder, but lower odds of reporting bulimia). The strength and the significance of the associations between asthma and psychiatric disorders varied when stratified by race, underscoring the importance of examining race as a potential explanation for the mixed findings observed previously in the literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 271, p. 721-725
Keywords [en]
Asthma, Depression, Anxiety, Substance use, Alcohol use, Race
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36954DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.046ISI: 000460709900106PubMedID: 30791347Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85058362253OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-36954DiVA, id: diva2:1270268
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, AndrewKoyanagi, Ai

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