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Economics of wildlife management-an overview
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1653-3437
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 64, no 2, article id 22Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study makes an explorative overview on two main research topics in economics of wildlife management: determination of population sizes and policy design. The results point out a large and comprehensive research on each of these issues, in particular on the estimation of values and costs of wildlife, where this information is necessary for the determination of population size. A drawback is that most of the value and cost studies do not relate their estimates to wildlife population size, which limits their usability for efficient policy design. Most valuation studies estimate the recreational value of hunting, which can range between 13 and 545 USD/hunting day (in 2013 prices), and two thirds of the included studies have been applied to wildlife in the USA. A majority of the studies on the costs of wildlife management calculate losses from carnivore predation on livestock and ungulate damage to crops, while a few consider dispersal of diseases and the cost of traffic collisions. Unlike valuation studies, several of the cost estimates apply to wildlife in developing and emerging economies. With respect to policy design the literature, which is mainly theoretical, suggests economic incentives for conflict resolution, where those suffering from wildlife damages are compensated for their losses. However, there are some issues which remain to be addressed by economists: relating costs and benefits to wildlife populations; estimating values and costs of wildlife in developing countries; evaluating wildlife policies in practice; addressing implications of uncertainty in population size, costs, and benefits for policy design; and estimating transaction costs for implementation and enforcement of wildlife policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 64, no 2, article id 22
Keywords [en]
Costs, Benefits, Policies, Economics, Wildlife, Review
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36582DOI: 10.1007/s10344-018-1180-3ISI: 000429734700010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85044581461OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-36582DiVA, id: diva2:1257947
Funder
Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 11/96Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, 12/133Available from: 2018-10-23 Created: 2018-10-23 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved

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Elofsson, Katarina

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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