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General thoughts of death and mortality: findings from the Komo-Ise cohort, Japan.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan.
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA.
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2018 (English)In: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, ISSN 2045-7960, E-ISSN 1827-4331, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AimsDeath ideation (thinking about/wishing for one's own death, thinking that one would be better off dead) is linked to an increased mortality risk. However, comparatively little is known about more general thoughts of death (GTOD) where no wish to die or life value is expressed. This study examined whether GTOD predicted mortality in a community-based cohort of older adults.

METHODS: Data came from the Komo-Ise cohort study in Gunma prefecture, Japan. The analytic sample comprised 8208 individuals (average age 61.3 (range 47-77)) who were asked in wave 2 of the study in 2000 if they had 'Thought about death more than usual, either your own, someone else's or death in general?' in the past 2 weeks. Death data were obtained from the municipal resident registration file. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine associations.

RESULTS: During the follow-up period (2000-2008), there were 672 deaths. In a model adjusted for baseline covariates, GTOD were significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazards ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.20-2.29). Stratified analyses showed an association between GTOD and mortality in men, older subjects (⩾70 years), married individuals and those with higher social support.

CONCLUSIONS: GTOD are associated with an increased mortality risk among older citizens in Japan. Research is now needed to determine the factors underlying this association and assess the clinical relevance of screening for GTOD in older individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. p. 1-8
Keywords [en]
Death, Japan, epidemiology, mortality
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36164DOI: 10.1017/S2045796018000434PubMedID: 30103836Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052710615OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-36164DiVA, id: diva2:1242815
Available from: 2018-08-29 Created: 2018-08-29 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, AndrewKoyanagi, Ai

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Citation style
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