sh.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Workfulness: governing the disobedient brain
Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.
Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Media and Communication Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5879-2130
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cultural Economy, ISSN 1753-0350, E-ISSN 1753-0369, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 535-548Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Scandinavian telecommunication company Telenor recently introduced the notion of Workfulness by adapting digital detox to the workplace. Workfulness is a management program aimed at technology-intensive companies that rely strongly on digital media. The program encompasses strategies of disconnection for employees, including mobile and email-free work hours and technology-free meetings, in order to enhance focus and efficiency. This article investigates Workfulness as one prominent example of managerial approaches that are based on neuroscientific assumptions about human decision-making. Drawing on textual materials and interviews, the analysis shows that Workfulness manages digital distractions in the workplace by establishing a form of stimulus-control rather than appealing to rational self-control. Workfulness alludes to the necessity of making choices, but it considers unconscious behavior, which is explained with reference to preconscious workings of the brain. The human brain becomes a battleground between rational and impulsive decisions, and it is the disobedient brain that needs to be governed in order to become an efficient employee. We situate the Workfulness program as part of and at the same time extending the biopolitical economy by incorporating advances in neurosciences into modes of governance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 11, no 6, p. 535-548
Keywords [en]
Mindfulness, digital detox, time management, governmentality, biopolitics, neurosciences
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35481DOI: 10.1080/17530350.2018.1481877ISI: 000456800700003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048058358OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-35481DiVA, id: diva2:1214425
Available from: 2018-06-06 Created: 2018-06-06 Last updated: 2019-02-26Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1607 kB)113 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1607 kBChecksum SHA-512
49b50dcfbb9b85c3d9caf5a8455f1834b2e43ebf259260ac24010758b0ccbc4b190110ee0806b4818cc88292a0ea272d87f77cf02f60b8a3065b43741613eb66
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Guyard, CarinaKaun, Anne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Guyard, CarinaKaun, Anne
By organisation
Media and Communication Studies
In the same journal
Journal of Cultural Economy
Media and Communications

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 113 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 204 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf