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Urinary incontinence, mental health and loneliness among community-dwelling older adults in Ireland.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu/CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Spain.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9565-5004
2017 (English)In: BMC Urology, ISSN 1471-2490, E-ISSN 1471-2490, Vol. 17, no 1, 29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence (UI) is associated with worse health among older adults. Little is known however, about its relation with loneliness or the role of mental health in this association. This study examined these factors among older adults in Ireland.

METHODS: Data were analyzed from 6903 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 50 collected in the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) in 2009-11. Information was obtained on the self-reported occurrence (yes/no) and severity (frequency/activity limitations) of UI in the past 12 months. Loneliness was measured using the UCLA Loneliness Scale short form. Information was also obtained on depression (CES-D), anxiety (HADS-A) and other sociodemographic variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between variables.

RESULTS: In a model adjusted for all potential confounders except mental disorders, compared to no UI, any UI was associated with significantly higher odds for loneliness (odds ratio: 1.51). When depression was included in the analysis, the association was attenuated and became non-significant while the inclusion of anxiety had a much smaller effect. Similarly, although frequency of UI and activity limitations due to UI were both significantly associated with loneliness prior to adjustment for mental disorders, neither association remained significant after adjustment for both depression and anxiety.

CONCLUSION: UI is associated with higher odds for loneliness among older community-dwelling adults but this association is largely explained by comorbid mental health problems, in particular, depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 17, no 1, 29
Keyword [en]
Anxiety, Depression, Lonely, Urinary incontinence
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32414DOI: 10.1186/s12894-017-0214-6ISI: 000398604000001PubMedID: 28388898ScopusID: 2-s2.0-8501847358OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-32414DiVA: diva2:1089062
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2017-05-24Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf