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Relationship between physiological and parent-observed auditory over-responsiveness in children with typical development and those with autism spectrum disorders.
National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan.
National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1260-2223
National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Japan.
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2016 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate relationships between caregiver-reported sensory processing abnormalities, and the physiological index of auditory over-responsiveness evaluated using acoustic startle response measures, in children with autism spectrum disorders and typical development. Mean acoustic startle response magnitudes in response to 65-105 dB stimuli, in increments of 10 dB, were analyzed in children with autism spectrum disorders and with typical development. Average peak startle latency was also examined. We examined the relationship of these acoustic startle response measures to parent-reported behavioral sensory processing patterns in everyday situations, assessed using the Sensory Profile for all participants. Low-threshold scores on the Sensory Profile auditory section were related to acoustic startle response magnitudes at 75 and 85 dB, but not to the lower intensities of 65 dB. The peak startle latency and acoustic startle response magnitudes at low-stimuli intensities of 65 and 75 dB were significantly related to the low-threshold quadrants (sensory sensitivity and sensation avoiding) scores and to the high-threshold quadrant of sensation seeking. Our results suggest that physiological assessment provides further information regarding auditory over-responsiveness to less-intense stimuli and its relationship to caregiver-observed sensory processing abnormalities in everyday situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016.
Keyword [en]
acoustic startle response, autism spectrum disorders, hypersensitivity, phenotype, response latency
National Category
Sociology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32261DOI: 10.1177/1362361316680497PubMedID: 28286962OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-32261DiVA: diva2:1082527
Available from: 2017-03-16 Created: 2017-03-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved

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Stickley, Andrew

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