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Large variation in predictors of mortality by levels of self-rated health: Results from an 18-year follow-up study
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute for Health Development, Tallinn, Estonia.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4453-4760
2017 (English)In: Public Health, ISSN 0033-3506, E-ISSN 1476-5616, Vol. 145, 59-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To analyze the variation in factors associated with mortality risk at different levels of self-rated health (SRH).

Study design: Retrospective cohort study.

Methods: Cox regression analysis was used to examine the association between mortality and demographic, socioeconomic and health-related predictors for respondents with good, average, and poor SRH in a longitudinal data set from Estonia with up to 18 years of follow-up time.

Results: In respondents with good SRH, male sex, older age, lower income, manual occupation, ever smoking, and heavy alcohol consumption predicted higher mortality. These covariates, together with marital status, illness-related limitations, and underweight predicted mortality in respondents with average SRH. For poor SRH, only being never married and having illness-related limitations predicted mortality risk in addition to older age and male sex.

Conclusions: The predictors of all-cause mortality are not universal but depend on the level of SRH. The higher mortality of respondents with poor SRH could to a large extent be attributed to health problems, whereas in the case of average or good SRH, factors other than the presence of illness explained outcome mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 145, 59-66 p.
Keyword [en]
Self-rated health, Mortality, Health concepts, Estonia
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31804DOI: 10.1016/j.puhe.2016.12.034ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85009957605OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-31804DiVA: diva2:1067143
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2017-03-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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