sh.sePublications
Change search
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Neighborhood Characteristics and Cardiovascular Risk among Older People in Japan: Findings from the JAGES Project
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition). University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 10, e0164525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have found an association between neighborhood characteristics (i.e., aspects of the physical and social environment) and the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and elevated CVD risk. This study investigated the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and CVD risk among older people in Japan where research on this association is scarce. Data came from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study project; questionnaire data collected from 3,810 people aged 65 years or older living in 20 primary school districts in Aichi prefecture, Japan, was linked to a computed composite CVD risk score based on biomarker data (i.e., hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and estimated glomerular filtration rate). A sex-stratified multilevel linear regression analysis revealed that for male participants, living in neighborhoods with a higher perceived occurrence of traffic accidents and reduced personal safety was associated with an elevated CVD risk (coefficient = 1.08 per interquartile range increase, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.30 to 1.86) whereas males living in neighborhoods with a higher perceived proximity of exercise facilities had a lower risk (coefficient = −1.00, 95% CI = −1.78 to −0.21). For females, there was no statistically significant association between neighborhood characteristics and CVD risk. This study suggests that aspects of the neighborhood environment might be important for CVD morbidity and mortality in Japan, particularly among men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 11, no 10, e0164525
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30994DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0164525ISI: 000385698100061PubMedID: 27716825ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84990943493OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-30994DiVA: diva2:1037097
Available from: 2016-10-13 Created: 2016-10-13 Last updated: 2016-11-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stickley, Andrew
By organisation
SociologySCOHOST (Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition)
In the same journal
PLoS ONE
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 25 hits
ReferencesLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link