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ADHD Symptoms and Pain among Adults in England
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Sociology. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change). National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan / University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain / Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.
National Institute of Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.
2016 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 246, 326-331 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Prior research has produced conflicting findings on the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and pain, while studies among community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study examined the association between ADHD symptoms and pain in the general adult population, and the extent to which this association is influenced by comorbid common mental disorders (CMDs). Data came from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey which included a representative sample of the English adult population aged ≥16 years (N=7403). The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was used to obtain information on ADHD symptoms, while pain was assessed by the degree to which it interfered with work activity in the previous month. The Clinical Interview Schedule Revised (CIS-R) was used to evaluate six categories of CMDs. In a binary logistic regression analysis adjusted for socio-demographic factors and physical health conditions, an ADHD symptom score ≥14 was strongly associated with extreme pain (odds ratio [OR]: 3.15, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.09–4.74). The OR was attenuated greatly after further adjustment for CMDs (OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.05–2.58) but remained statistically significant. Adults with ADHD symptoms have higher odds for experiencing pain. CMDs are influential in this association but do not fully explain it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 246, 326-331 p.
Keyword [en]
Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Common mental disorders, Cross-sectional study
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30992DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2016.10.004ISI: 000390968300049PubMedID: 27750114ScopusID: 2-s2.0-84991660814OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-30992DiVA: diva2:1037095
Available from: 2016-10-13 Created: 2016-10-13 Last updated: 2017-03-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf