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Suspect Survival: Matrophobia in Postmemory Generational Writing
Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, English language.
2019 (English)In: American, British and Canadian Studies, ISSN 1841-1487, E-ISSN 1841-964X, Vol. 33, p. 89-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Family and kinship carry special significance to Holocaust survivors and their descendants. In autobiographies and family memoirs, writers of what Marianne Hirsch terms the postmemory generation employ different narrative strategies for coming to terms with the ways in which the Holocaust has marked their identities and family ties. This article focuses on women’s writing of the postmemory generation, examining three works in English by daughters of survivors in the UK, the US, and Canada, written during the 1990s. It investigates the narrative strategies used by Anne Karpf, Helen Fremont, and Lisa Appignanesi to represent maternal sexual agency and vulnerability in a survival context. It suggests that these representations are strongly influenced by matrophobia and matrophilia, defined as the conflicting dread of becoming and desire to be one’s mother, which are themselves strongly conditioned by Holocaust history, particularly the gendered history of vulnerability among women in open hiding during the war.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sibiu, Romania: Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu , 2019. Vol. 33, p. 89-117
Keywords [en]
postmemory, second generation, memoir, autobiography, mother-daughter relations, Lisa Appignanesi, Helen Fremont, Anne Karpf, Holocaust, sexuality
National Category
Specific Literatures
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40067DOI: 10.2478/abcsj-2019-0017Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85078456573OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-40067DiVA, id: diva2:1390621
Part of project
Remembering Poland and Eastern Europe: Nostalgia, Memory, and Affect in Diasporic Women’s Writing, The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 31/2015Available from: 2020-02-02 Created: 2020-02-02 Last updated: 2020-02-14Bibliographically approved

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Kella, Elizabeth

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf