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The Swedish Senate, 1867-1970: From elitist moderniser to democratic subordinate
Södertörn University, School of Historical and Contemporary Studies, Institute of Contemporary History.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7766-9536
2019 (English)In: Reforming Senates: Upper Legislative Houses in North Atlantic Small Powers 1800 - present / [ed] Nikolaj Bijleveld; Colin Grittner; David E Smith; Wybren Verstegen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In January 1867, the new Swedish Parliament, the bicameral Riksdag, was opened. Its upper chamber, based on graduated voting rights, played a decisive role in the process of modernisation for several decades. Liberals and conservatives used the state as an instrument, contrary to the principles of laissez-faire. The upper chamber, with its positive attitude towards allotments and government intervention, acted in a more progressive way than the lower chamber, while also strongly defending its privileged political position. Its more dynamic role in the field of economics was lost in the 1880s when a modern party system was introduced, and increased parliamentarism and universal suffrage were demanded. In the decisive year of 1918, conservatives in the upper chamber were subjected to strong pressure to yield to democratic reform. The attitudes of business leaders, the archbishop and members of the royal family were specially important in this respect. The fear of a more radical development, like in Russia and Germany, and the need for stability forced them to support reform. After the democratic breakthrough, the Swedish Senate, lacking a real function, increasingly lost its legitimacy, before it was disbanded after its last session on 16 December 1970.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2019.
Series
Routledge studies in modern history
Keywords [en]
Senates, North Atlantic World
National Category
History
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39817DOI: 10.4324/9780429323119-10ISBN: 978-0-367-33968-5 (print)ISBN: 9780429323119 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-39817DiVA, id: diva2:1385103
Available from: 2020-01-13 Created: 2020-01-13 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved

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Nilsson, Torbjörn

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf