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Do citizens use storytelling or rational argumentation to lobby politicians?
Uppsala universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5921-0983
Uppsala universitet.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3522-4966
Södertörn University, School of Culture and Education, Swedish Language.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5590-5980
2019 (English)In: Policy and politics (Print), ISSN 0305-5736, E-ISSN 1470-8442, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 543-559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Policy Press, 2019. Vol. 47, no 4, p. 543-559
Keywords [en]
communication; deliberation; everyday politics; immigration; narrative; norms; reasons; storytelling
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39024DOI: 10.1332/030557319X15613700896551OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-39024DiVA, id: diva2:1352408
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-811
Note

What should count as legitimate forms of reasoning in public deliberation is a contested issue. Democratic theorists have argued that storytelling may offer a more accessible form of deliberation for marginalised citizens than ‘rational argumentation’. We investigate the empirical support for this claim by examining Swedish citizens’ use of storytelling in written communication with the political establishment. We test whether stories are used frequently, as well as by whom, and how they are used. We find that storytelling is (1) rare, (2) not more frequent among people with nonmainstream views, and (3) used together with rational argumentation. In line with some previous research, we show that stories still play other important roles: authorising the author, undermining political opponents and, most often, further supporting arguments made in ‘rational’ form. The results suggest that people rely more on rational argumentation than storytelling when expecting interlocutors to be hostile to their views.

Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved

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Magnusson, Simon

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf