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Producing Printability: Articulation Work and Alignment in 3D Printing
University of Washington, USA.
Södertörn University, School of Natural Sciences, Technology and Environmental Studies, Media Technology. Stockholm University.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9066-4673
University of Washington, USA.
Immersive Experiences Lab of HP Labs.
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2019 (English)In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 433-469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three-dimensional printing is widely celebrated as enabling open design and manufacturing practice. With easy-to-use techniques such as automated modeling, fabrication machines ostensibly help designers turn ideas into fully fledged objects. Prior HCI literature focuses on improving printing through optimization and by developing printer and material capabilities. This paper expands such considerations by asking, how do 3D printing practitioners understand and create “printability?” And how might HCI better support the work that holds together printing workflows and changing ecosystems of materials and techniques? We conducted studies in two sites of open design: a technology firm in Silicon Valley, California and a makerspace in Stockholm, Sweden. Deploying workshops and interviews, we examine how practitioners negotiate the print experience, revealing a contingent process held together by trial and error exploration and careful interventions. These insights point to the value of tools and processes to support articulation work, what Strauss and colleagues have called the acts of fitting together people, tasks, and their ordering to accomplish an overarching project. We show that despite the sought-after efficiencies of such manufacturing, 3D printing entails articulation work, particularly acts of alignment, exposing messy modes of production carried out by a varied cast of practitioners, machines, and materials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019. Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 433-469
Keywords [en]
Human computer interaction, User interfaces, 3-D printing, Articulation works, Automated modeling, Manufacturing practices, Printing workflows, Silicon valley, Stockholm, Sweden, Trial and error, 3D printers
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37765DOI: 10.1080/07370024.2019.1566001ISI: 000480290400003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85061232609OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-37765DiVA, id: diva2:1291955
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2022-11-03Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Makers, Materials and Machines: Understanding Experience and Situated Embodied Practice in the Makerspace
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Makers, Materials and Machines: Understanding Experience and Situated Embodied Practice in the Makerspace
2022 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis explores interaction between humans, materials, and machines, in the context of makerspaces. The concept of making describes a practice that deals with new technologies in combination with craft to create artifacts in physical, digital and hybrid forms. Despite substantial research, there is still a need to examine what practices of making have to offer to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research. This particularly concerns investigations of the close relations between the multitudes of different activities, materials, machines and things in such shared spaces.

Making is discussed as a practice of importance for interaction design and conceptualised as involving a particular mindset when engaging with materials and machines. Based on this, my work argues that the phenomenon calls for a deeper reflection on recent movements on material interaction and materiality on the one hand, and perspectives on machine interactions on the other. I explore how situated and embodied practices can be revealed in investigations of makerspace activities. Further, my work describes how makers experience and make sense of the materials and machines that populate makerspaces. Finally, I map out how insights on experience and practice with machines and materials can be conceptualised in a way that become useful for contemporary interaction design practices.

The presented research builds on four qualitative studies, in which I draw on investigations in the makerspace and combine an ethnographic approach with participant observation, design methods and contextual inquiry. The resulting five collaboratively written papers frame making as an experience in itself and discover particular ways of making sense of materials. Further, we study embodied and situated dimensions of 3D printing, as well as practices concerning modding and the maintenance of machines and explore how practitioners may develop a maker mindset. The papers contribute with a set of conceptualisations such as “material literacy” when taking artifacts apart, “machine sensibility”, which practitioners show in their interaction with 3D printing, and the “pliable machine” that emerged from studying modding of a laser cutter. These conceptualizations highlight new aspects and perspectives of maker activities and interactions previously less accounted for.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Computer & Systems Sciences, Stockholm University, 2022. p. 116
Series
Södertörn Doctoral Dissertations, ISSN 1652-7399 ; 208
Series
DSV report series, ISSN 1101-8526 ; 22-003
Keywords
HCI, making, materials, machines, experience, makerspace, situated practice, embodied interaction, material interaction, maker culture, material turn, digital fabrication, material literacy, machine sensibility, pliable machine
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Human Aspects of ICT
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-49972 (URN)978-91-7911-998-0 (ISBN)978-91-7911-999-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2022-10-21, Lilla hörsalen, NOD-huset, Borgarfjordsgatan 12, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2022-09-29 Created: 2022-09-29 Last updated: 2022-09-29Bibliographically approved

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Landwehr Sydow, SophieJonsson, Martin

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Citation style
  • apa
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  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
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