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Inhalant use in adolescents in northern Russia
UiT The Arctic University of Norway,Tromsö, Norway.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).
Uppsala University / Yale University Medical School, New Haven, USA / Säter Forensic Psychiatric Clinic.
2018 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 709-716Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of inhalant use in Russian adolescents and to investigate associated psychosocial problems from a gender perspective. Methods: Data on inhalant use and comorbid psychopathology were collected by means of self-reports from 2892 (42.4% boys) sixth to tenth grade students in public schools in Arkhangelsk, Russia. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to assess differences in the levels of internalizing and externalizing problems in boys and girls, who were non-users and users of inhalants. Results: The prevalence of inhalant use was 6.1% among boys and 3.4% among girls. Compared with non-users, inhalant users scored significantly higher on internalizing and externalizing problems, functional impairment and lower on academic motivation, with psychopathology increasing with age. While there were no gender differences for internalizing problems, increased levels of externalizing problems in inhalant users were gender-specific (significantly higher in boys). Conclusions: Inhalant use is related to significantly higher levels of comorbid psychopathology in Russian adolescents. Comprehensive, evidence-based prevention and intervention policies are needed to address inhalant use and its harmful effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 53, no 7, p. 709-716
Keywords [en]
Adolescents, Inhalant use, Mental health
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35770DOI: 10.1007/s00127-018-1524-zISI: 000435524000006PubMedID: 29721591Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048705009OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-35770DiVA, id: diva2:1228946
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • Other style
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  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
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