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Health and living conditions of Samis compared with other citizens based on representative surveys in three Swedish regions
Jönköping University.
Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, Social Work. Södertörn University, School of Social Sciences, SCOHOST (Stockholm Centre for Health and Social Change).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2899-3839
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 255-269Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is the first general health survey of Samis compared with other Swedes to be based on randomised samples. In three regions, Samis were compared with respondents to the Public Health Investigation (n = 613 Samis and 6,309 respondents). Samis were also compared as to gender and membership in reindeer‐herding Sami villages (SVs). The survey shows that Samis of today have better education, work situation and health, and a healthier lifestyle than other Swedish citizens living in the same regions. There are, however, great differences among the Samis themselves. Members of SVs have weaker finances, and they report having less societal trust and worse health than non‐members do. Male members have lower education, are less involved in social activities and report worse overall health, but do not have a higher incidence of psychiatric problems, than other Samis. Samis, in general, have similar or better health and social situation than non‐Samis, but male SV‐members face greater problems and higher risks than other Samis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020. Vol. 29, no 3, p. 255-269
Keywords [en]
indigenous mental health, Samis in Sweden, social situation, social capital, alcohol and tobacco use, epidemiology, quantitative research
National Category
Social Work
Research subject
Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40534DOI: 10.1111/ijsw.12419ISI: 000541674200006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85082948587OAI: oai:DiVA.org:sh-40534DiVA, id: diva2:1423317
Available from: 2020-04-14 Created: 2020-04-14 Last updated: 2020-07-10Bibliographically approved

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Carlson, Per

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • apa-old-doi-prefix.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-harvard.csl
  • sodertorns-hogskola-oxford.csl
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf