sh.sePublications
Change search
ExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA

Project

Project type/Form of grant
Project grant
Title [sv]
Virtuell vardag
Title [en]
Virtual Everyday Life
Abstract [sv]
The aim of this project is to study online virtual world Second Life as an everyday culture. Participation in virtual worlds is no longer the preserve of an exclusive group but is fast becoming an aspect of mainstream media use. Studies of virtual worlds have often tended to focus on the imaginary or boundary-breaking elements of Internet culture. Second Life is however interesting as it constitutes a rather ordinary social space. Its many million users are offered an alternative day-to-day existence, where they meet and socialise but also go to the same banks, shops and churches that exist Away From the Keyboard (AFK). Despite these similarities of the online and the offline world, the frames for human existence and social interaction within Second Life have, due to the particular limits of the mediated context, their own cultural constraints. This project examines the way that everyday life is constructed and communicated within Second Life; looking at how time, space and social relations, routines and normality are established within the virtual world. By approaching the research from a media studies perspective, through phenomenological and anthropological theories of everyday life and media use, the project will enlarge our understanding of everyday life in modern society and add a perspective largely missing in international Internet research.
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Bengtsson, S. (2016). The Right to the Citi(zen): Urban Spaces in Commercial Media Environments. Space and Culture, 19(4), 478-489
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Right to the Citi(zen): Urban Spaces in Commercial Media Environments
2016 (English)In: Space and Culture, ISSN 1206-3312, E-ISSN 1552-8308, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 478-489Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Following the publication of Henri Lefebvre’s book Le Droit à la ville (1968), a debate has emerged regarding the neoliberal takeover of urban spaces and activism. Nonetheless, in the past 10 years, we have seen the continuous expansion of public space via social networking media and, today, most public institutions in Western states use social networking sites to communicate with their “citizens.” Although there are many serious problems associated with this takeover, little has been said about them so far. In this article, I address the contribution of The right to the city to this debate by analyzing a public institution which tried to establish communication with its “citizens” in an urban space in a virtual world. My analysis concludes that the users of this new media platform did not regard themselves as citizens when they were dwelling in this urban space online, but instead saw themselves as the consumers they were addressed as in this environment.

Keywords
Urban space, citizenship, virtual worlds, Second Life
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29818 (URN)10.1177/1206331215621010 (DOI)000385812400013 ()2-s2.0-84991515320 (Scopus ID)1045/42/2011 (Local ID)1045/42/2011 (Archive number)1045/42/2011 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-01848
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2022-07-07Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, S. (2014). Faraway, so close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online. Media Culture and Society, 36(6), 862-877
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faraway, so close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online
2014 (English)In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 862-877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article argues for a revised importance of distance, besides the much emphasized closeness, in the debate on and use of ethnographic methods in online environments. When returning to the founding fathers of ethnographic methods, distance is often put forward as a core aspect of ethnographic methods, something widely forgotten, or even rejected, in the current debate in the field. Space has been restructured by digital media technologies, and the spatial and temporal proximity of digital  media cultures present new challenges for research methodologies. Based on the author’s own experiences of ethnographic fieldwork in digital cultures, and with Henri Lefebvre’s theory of everyday life as a rhythm as vantage point, it is here argued that  distance, dialectically interlinked with closeness and proximity, should be given further attention in current research and debate on ethnographic methods used online.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
digital cultures, distance, ethnography, everyday life, methodology, proximity, qualitative methods, rhythmanalysis
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-24343 (URN)10.1177/0163443714531195 (DOI)000342800000009 ()2-s2.0-84910027585 (Scopus ID)1045/42/2011 (Local ID)1045/42/2011 (Archive number)1045/42/2011 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-01848
Available from: 2014-08-11 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2022-07-07Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, S. (2014). Faraway, So Close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online. In: : . Paper presented at International Communication Association: Communication and the ‘Good Life’, Seattle, May 22-26, 2014..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faraway, So Close!: Proximity and distance in ethnography online
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Keywords
Ethnography, methodology, everyday life, Lefebvre
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-21437 (URN)
Conference
International Communication Association: Communication and the ‘Good Life’, Seattle, May 22-26, 2014.
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-01848
Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2022-07-07Bibliographically approved
Principal InvestigatorBengtsson, Stina
Coordinating organisation
Södertörn University
Funder
Period
2010-01-01 - 2012-12-31
Identifiers
DiVA, id: project:1890Project, id: 2009-01848_VR

Search in DiVA

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar