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Gradskova, Y. (2024). The Palgrave Handbook of Communist Women Activists around the World. Ed. by Francisca de Haan. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham 2023. [Review]. International Review of Social History, 69(1), 170-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Palgrave Handbook of Communist Women Activists around the World. Ed. by Francisca de Haan. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham 2023.
2024 (English)In: International Review of Social History, ISSN 0020-8590, E-ISSN 1469-512X, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 170-174Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2024
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53856 (URN)10.1017/S0020859024000166 (DOI)001193179900001 ()
Available from: 2024-04-23 Created: 2024-04-23 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2023). Feministiskt antikrigsmotstånd: Hur är det att som feminist kämpa mot Rysslands krig mot Ukraina?. Nordisk Østforum, 37, 189-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feministiskt antikrigsmotstånd: Hur är det att som feminist kämpa mot Rysslands krig mot Ukraina?
2023 (Swedish)In: Nordisk Østforum, ISSN 0801-7220, E-ISSN 1891-1773, Vol. 37, p. 189-195Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

This article is about the Feminist Anti-War Resistance (FAS), a network of activists within and outside Russia united in their support for LGBTQ+ rights and ready to resist the patriarchy and the Russian war on Ukraine. The article explores FAS’s ideas and tactics of activism.

Abstract [sv]

Feministiskt antikrig motstånd (FAM – feministskoe antivoennoe soprotivlenie) var en av de första nätverken som offentligt visade sin protest mot Rysslands anfall av Ukraina februari 24 2022. Nu, när kriget fortsätter mer än ett år, kan man med säkerhet säga att FAM  inte bara fortsätter att vara en av dem mest konsekventa motståndare av kriget, men att den är också en av de mest radikala kritiker av de politiska och kulturella strukturer och värderingar som ligger till grund av ryska expansionismen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2023
Keywords
feminism, Russian war on Ukraina, resistance
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53991 (URN)10.23865/noros.v37.5566 (DOI)
Available from: 2024-05-20 Created: 2024-05-20 Last updated: 2024-05-20Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2023). From Defending Women’s Rights in the “Whole World” to Silence About Russia’s Predatory War?: The (Geo)politics of the Eurasian Women’s Forums in the Context of “Traditional Values”. In: Sätre, Ann-Mari; Gradskova, Yulia; Vladimirova, Vladislava (Ed.), Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment (pp. 29-49). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Defending Women’s Rights in the “Whole World” to Silence About Russia’s Predatory War?: The (Geo)politics of the Eurasian Women’s Forums in the Context of “Traditional Values”
2023 (English)In: Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment / [ed] Sätre, Ann-Mari; Gradskova, Yulia; Vladimirova, Vladislava, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2023, p. 29-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this chapter is to explore certain similarities and some differences between the Soviet women’s organizations on the one hand and state supported women’s organizations in Russia now on the other. The Soviet propaganda was well known for presenting Soviet women as fully enjoying equal rights with men. Ideas on equality were used to create a positive image of the country abroad, as well as to gain alliances for the Eastern bloc. This chapter also explores the work of the contemporary pro-governmental Women’s Union of Russia (heir of the Committee of Soviet Women) — and the new institution promoted by Russia that was declared to enable international cooperation around women’s issues: the Eurasian Women’s Forum. In this chapter I show that in the context of international sanctions due to the annexation of Crimea, international condemnation of Russian authorities’ attacks on LGBTQ+ rights and women’s NGOs, and in particular, after the beginning of the Russian full-scale invasion of Ukraine, the Russian government once again attempted to use women’s organizations as an important (geo)political instrument.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2023
Series
Sustainable Development Goals Series, ISSN 2523-3084, E-ISSN 2523-3092
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-52703 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-38066-2_2 (DOI)2-s2.0-85185257894 (Scopus ID)978-3-031-38065-5 (ISBN)978-3-031-38066-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-17 Created: 2023-11-17 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2023). Maternalism and new imperialism in Russia: “good mothers” for a militarizing state—expectations, implications, and resistances. Frontiers in Sociology, 8, Article ID 1192822.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternalism and new imperialism in Russia: “good mothers” for a militarizing state—expectations, implications, and resistances
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Sociology, E-ISSN 2297-7775, Vol. 8, article id 1192822Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores maternalism in Russia in the context of the contemporary Russian authoritarian state. In particular, I analyze what implications maternalism has for women, mothers, and families on the one hand and how it is connected to the Russian state's new imperial ambitions on the other. I also explore how maternalism is challenged and employed by those resisting state politics, including militarism. Historically, maternalism was used for the analysis of the development of the welfare state in Europe and beyond and for studying women's activism that contributed to significant changes in the state's welfare politics. Maternalism in European history could be seen as “a progressive heterosexual maternal womanhood”; according to Mary Daly, it could be explained as a recognition of the “existence of a uniquely feminine value system based on care and nurturing” and as the assumption that women are performing “a service to the state by raising citizen-workers”. Gender historians of Latin America showed that speaking from the position of a mother was quite important for claiming both the right to be accepted as an equal citizen and the improvement of maternity care, welfare, and living conditions for mothers and children. Furthermore, maternalism was widely used in protests against state militarism, wars, and military dictatorships, not least as a part of the campaign against the Vietnam War or the crimes of the Argentinian military dictatorship. However, maternalism was also widely used by several totalitarian regimes, including fascism and Stalinism. Maternalism was an important political instrument used by the state socialist discourse in order to show the superiority of the “socialist” welfare system over the “capitalist” one and to make this system appear attractive to women from “developing” countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
National Category
History
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-52848 (URN)10.3389/fsoc.2023.1192822 (DOI)001118951000001 ()38077986 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178931806 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 21-PR2-0010
Available from: 2023-12-12 Created: 2023-12-12 Last updated: 2024-01-03Bibliographically approved
Sätre, A.-M., Gradskova, Y. & Vladimirova, V. (Eds.). (2023). Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment
2023 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This volume explores how different post-Soviet countries have reinterpreted and diverged from the Soviet gender roles and values. It synthesizes results from multiple empirical studies that attend to increasingly conservative features of political governance in the region, particularly the authoritarian regime in Russia. The authors consider diverse enactments of ideologies, policies and practices of gender equality and women’s rights in crucial areas, such as legislative institutions, media, and social activism. The volume contributes to understanding post-Soviet societal dynamics relevant to United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 5, which emphasizes gender equality as part of fundamental human rights.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2023. p. 367
Series
Sustainable Development Goals Series, ISSN 2523-3084, E-ISSN 2523-3092
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-52701 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-38066-2 (DOI)978-3-031-38065-5 (ISBN)978-3-031-38066-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-17 Created: 2023-11-17 Last updated: 2023-11-17Bibliographically approved
Sätre, A.-M., Vladimirova, V. & Gradskova, Y. (2023). Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment-Introduction. In: Sätre, Ann-Mari; Gradskova, Yulia; Vladimirova, Vladislava (Ed.), Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment (pp. 1-26). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment-Introduction
2023 (English)In: Post-Soviet Women: New Challenges and Ways to Empowerment / [ed] Sätre, Ann-Mari; Gradskova, Yulia; Vladimirova, Vladislava, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2023, p. 1-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This volume explores the challenges that women face, their positions in changing societies, the negotiation of their roles and their responses to change and ways to achieve women’s empowerment. The regional focus is on countries in the territory of the former Soviet Union. With this volume, we fill a gap in the published knowledge on recent politics, ideology, identity and activism in relation to gender and to women that have been seriously impacted by conservative politics and resurgent nationalism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2023
Series
Sustainable Development Goals Series, ISSN 2523-3084, E-ISSN 2523-3092
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-52704 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-38066-2_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85185660410 (Scopus ID)978-3-031-38065-5 (ISBN)978-3-031-38068-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-11-17 Created: 2023-11-17 Last updated: 2024-03-05Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2023). The cultural Cold War and development: the Women’s International Democratic Federation (1960-1980). Clio.: Women, Gender, History, 57(1), 47-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The cultural Cold War and development: the Women’s International Democratic Federation (1960-1980)
2023 (English)In: Clio.: Women, Gender, History, ISSN 1252-7017, E-ISSN 1777-5299, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 47-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the WIDF’s programs with non-European women in the so-called “developing countries.” The WIDF, created in Paris in 1945, defended anti-colonialism and anti-racism, and campaigned for equality between men and women “throughout the whole world”. The article explores connections between WIDF’s campaigns for changing the status of women and economic development in the context of cultural competition during the Cold War. The documents analyzed here show that its programs in support of women in developing countries laid importance on solidarity with the anti-colonial struggle and on state support for motherhood and children. WIDF’s presentation of its work for women from “developing countries” stressed its difference from the kind of work carried out by its Cold War adversaries. However, like Western development programs, most of those encouraged by the WIDF were influenced by the ideology of modernity and had little regard for pre-colonial or other specific forms of women’s power and solidarity. Furthermore, women working for the WIDF often expressed their lack of confidence in women from the “developing countries”, and indeed sometimes had racist attitudes towards non-European women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Belin, 2023
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53463 (URN)
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2021). The "Woman of the East" and Soviet Orientalism: Reviewing the Soviet story on the "emancipation" of women in Azerbaijan in the 1920s-1930s. Kafkasya çalışmaları (SI), 1-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The "Woman of the East" and Soviet Orientalism: Reviewing the Soviet story on the "emancipation" of women in Azerbaijan in the 1920s-1930s
2021 (English)In: Kafkasya çalışmaları, ISSN 2149-9527, no SI, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article aims to explore the Soviet way of dealing with the socalled “woman of the East” and to find out how much it is possible to speak about Orientalism with respect to early Soviet cultural and educational production. I explore how the “woman of the East” was constructed in different materials in Russian language focusing on the emancipation of women in the Caucasus and, particularly, in Azerbaijan from the 1920s-1930s. I am also interested in how the information about the “docile Muslim women” and women’s emancipation in the Caucasus and particularly in Azerbaijan was spread abroad. In order to do it I analyze Soviet publications and films dedicated to women in Caucasus and Azerbaijan. The study shows that in spite of critique of the colonial politics of the tsarist regime, the Soviet cultural production preserves many orientalist clichés and tropes. The presentation of women in Azerbaijan as “dominated, “slaves” and “shadows” helped constructing the Russians as a whole and the Russian women in particular, as freer and more modern. According to Said, “identifying ‘us’ Europeans as against“those’ non-Europeans” (1996, 7) is an important mechanism for producing the “west”. The analyzed materials suggest that the narrative on the “backward woman” in the Caucasus was important not only for convincing the Soviet people in the important emancipatory mission ofthe Soviet state, but also for improving the state’s image in the “West”and the “East”. Indeed, the Soviet emancipators were described in the publications of the “Soviet friends” as those fighting against colonialismand, at the same time, carrying out the civilizing mission similar to that ofthe “Western” countries

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Murat TOPÇU, 2021
Keywords
gender history, Soviet emancipation, orientalism, woman of the East, Caucasus
National Category
History
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-46074 (URN)
Available from: 2021-07-02 Created: 2021-07-02 Last updated: 2022-05-20Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2021). Women's education, entry to paid work, and forced unveiling in Soviet Central Asia. In: Katalin Fábián; Janet Elise Johnson; Mara Lazda (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Gender in Central-Eastern Europe and Eurasia: (pp. 227-235). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women's education, entry to paid work, and forced unveiling in Soviet Central Asia
2021 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of Gender in Central-Eastern Europe and Eurasia / [ed] Katalin Fábián; Janet Elise Johnson; Mara Lazda, London: Routledge, 2021, p. 227-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This chapter explores the implications of Bolshevik (1920s) and Soviet (1930s) ideas on gender equality in the territory of Central Asia that had been colonized by the Russian Empire in the 19th century. It places the study of Bolshevik politics at the intersection of national and gender politics. The Soviet scenario for what they called the emancipation of “women of the East” showed itself to be contradictory and marked by imperial and orientalist thinking about “Other” women as more backward than women from the Russian center and unable to find their own way to freedom. Bolshevik propaganda on the “backward woman of the East” resulted in promoting the dependent position of non-Russian women and elevating the status of Russian women and Russia itself. However, women of different national backgrounds who participated in early Bolshevik emancipation campaigns became victims of Stalin’s Great Terror of the late 1930s. The Central Asian women’s experience demonstrates the importance of examining Soviet gender ideology as it shaped and was shaped by ethnicity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2021
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-46576 (URN)10.4324/9781138347762-38 (DOI)2-s2.0-85115928734 (Scopus ID)9780429792304 (ISBN)9781138347755 (ISBN)9781138347762 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-10-15 Created: 2021-10-15 Last updated: 2021-10-15Bibliographically approved
Gradskova, Y. (2020). Personal is Not Political?: The Sexual Self in Russian Talk Shows of the 1990s. Sexuality & Culture, 24(2), 389-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personal is Not Political?: The Sexual Self in Russian Talk Shows of the 1990s
2020 (English)In: Sexuality & Culture, ISSN 1095-5143, E-ISSN 1936-4822, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 389-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The changes in the public discourse on sex and the sexual self in post-Soviet Russia are usually referred to as a “sexual revolution”. However, the fast rejection of freedoms with respect to sexual identities, same-sex relationships and withering of the public discussions about intimacies and sex-education already in the early 2000s requires closer look at discourses of the “sexual revolution” of the 1990s in Russia in order to understand better the character of this rapid change. In this paper I am particularly interested in the discursive dimension and historical implications of the new sexual selves as expressed in the public space in a form of TV-show. The article is analyzing discourses around sexuality and intimacy with focus on two talk-shows broadcasted by the Russian television in the 1990s (“Ya sama” and “Pro eto”) and dealing with gender identities, sexualities and intimacies. I show that articulation of the sexual self as a choice that is relatively free from political and material constraints was an important dimension of the public presentation of sexuality. At the same time differences and deviations from the institutionalized and normalized (hetero)sexuality started to be seen as a subject of “personal choice” and “individual responsibility”. © 2020, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
(De)Politicization, 1990s, Russia, Sexual self, Social change, Talk-show
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40205 (URN)10.1007/s12119-019-09695-3 (DOI)000519895300003 ()2-s2.0-85078348349 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-04-02Bibliographically approved
Projects
Familjen och den starka staten i ett Östeuropa/Östersjöperspektiv: frigörelse eller tvång? [A082-2007_OSS]; Södertörn University; Publications
Asztalos Morell, I. (2012). A Life of Labor, a Life of Love: Telling the Life of a Young Peasant Mother Facing Collectivization. In: Carlbäck, Helene, Gradskova, Yulia, Kravchenko, Zhanna (Ed.), And They Lived Happily Ever After: Norms and Everyday Practices of Family and Parenthood in Russia and Eastern Europe. (pp. 65-84). Budapest: Central European University PressFarhan, C. (2012). East German Women going West: Family, children and partners in life experience literature. In: Carlbäck, Helene, Gradskova, Yulia, Kravchenko, Zhanna (Ed.), And They Lived Happily Ever After: Norms and Everyday Practices of Family and Parenthood in Russia and Eastern Europe (pp. 85-104). Budapest: Central European University PressCarlbäck, H., Gradskova, Y. & Kravchenko, Z. (2012). Introduction. In: Carlbäck, Helene, Gradskova, Yulia, Kravchenko, Zhanna (Ed.), And They Lived Happily Ever After: Norms and Everyday Practices of Family and Parenthood in Russia and Eastern Europe (pp. 1-22). Budapest: Central European University PressCarlbäck, H. (2012). Lone Motherhood in Soviet Russia in Mid 20th Century – in a European Context. In: Carlbäck, Helene, Gradskova, Yulia, Kravchenko, Zhanna (Ed.), And They Lived Happily Ever After: Norms and Everyday Practices of Family and Parenthood in Russia and Eastern Europe (pp. 25-46). Budapest: Central European University PressRuncis, M. (2012). The Latvian Family Experience with Sovietization 1945–1990. In: Carlbäck, Helene, Gradskova, Yulia, Kravchenko, Zhanna (Ed.), And They Lived Happily Ever After: Norms and Everyday Practices of Family and Parenthood in Russia and Eastern Europe (pp. 123-141). Budapest: Central European University PressGradskova, Y. (2009). "Nigde tak ne oberegaiut detstvo kak v nashei strane": doshkolnye uchrezhdenia v sovetskom dokumentalnom kino, 1946-1960е gg.. In: Pavel Romanov & Elena Iarskaia-Smirnova (Ed.), Vizualnaia antropologiia: rezhimy vidimosti pri sotsialisme (pp. 359-370). Moskva: Variant
Mourning Becomes Electra. Gender discrimination and human rights. [A009-2009_OSS]; Södertörn University; Publications
Blomberg, E. (2015). Det går an: Jämställdhetsombudsmannen i Sverige 1980-2008 (1ed.). Malmö: Universus Academic Press/ Roos & TegnerGradskova, Y. & Sanders, S. (Eds.). (2015). Institutionalizing gender equality: historical and global perspectives. Lanham: Lexington BooksGradskova, Y. & Sanders, S. (2015). Internationalization, Institutionalization, and Glocalization: Gender, Equality as Process. In: Gradskova, Yulia ; Sanders, Sara (Ed.), Institutionalizing gender equality: historical and global perspectives (pp. 1-18). Lanham: Lexington BooksGradskova, Y. (2015). Organizing Girls’ Groups for a Better Future: Local and Global Challenges and Solutions. Girlhood Studies, 8(1), 76-92Gradskova, Y. (2015). "This Law Is Simply a Blind Copy of the Most Radical Feminist Laws of Northen Europe": Gender Equality (Non)Institutionalization - An Example of Nordic Cooperation with Norhwest Russia. In: Gradskova, Yulia ; Sanders, Sara (Ed.), Institutionalizing gender equality: historical and global perspectives (pp. 229-244). Lanham: Lexington BooksGradskova, Y. (2015). Translating "Gender Equality": Northwestern Russia meets the Global Gender Equality Agenda. Baltic Worlds (1-2), 69-74Blomberg, E., Waldemarson, Y. & Žvinklienė, A. (2014). Gender Equality Policies: Swedish and Lithuanian Experiences of Nordic Ideas. In: Götz, Norbert (Ed.), The Sea of Identities: A Century of Baltic and East European Experiences with Nationality, Class, and Gender (pp. 225-246). Huddinge: Södertörns högskola
Researching gender and sexuality in Eastern European history and post-socialist present: Does race matter? [21-RN-0001_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityMaternity in time of “traditional values” and femonationalism [21-PR2-0010_OS]; Södertörn University; Publications
Gradskova, Y. (2023). Maternalism and new imperialism in Russia: “good mothers” for a militarizing state—expectations, implications, and resistances. Frontiers in Sociology, 8, Article ID 1192822.
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0975-5560

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