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Muchitsch, Veronika, Fil.drORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1505-4357
Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Muchitsch, V. (2024). Sad Girls on TikTok: Musical and Multimodal Participatory Practices as Affective Negotiations of Ordinary Feelings and Knowledges in Online Music Cultures. Popular music and society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sad Girls on TikTok: Musical and Multimodal Participatory Practices as Affective Negotiations of Ordinary Feelings and Knowledges in Online Music Cultures
2024 (English)In: Popular music and society, ISSN 0300-7766, E-ISSN 1740-1712Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This article examines musical participatory practices on TikTok as mediations of ordinary feelings and knowledges. It conducts a multimodal analysis of user-generated videos that recirculated the song “Complex” by Scottish singer-songwriter Katie Gregson-MacLeod, which became widely successful on the app in 2022. Through its features and sociotechnical affordances, TikTok fosters feminine-coded articulations of intimate affects and negotiations of ordinary feelings and knowledges that have been marginalized in popular music cultures. Its intersecting algorithmic logics and human practices also create new rules about what affective sensibilities are foregrounded and how they are circulated through multimodal and memetic participatory practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2024
Keywords
affect, gender, online media, Popular music, TikTok
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53707 (URN)10.1080/03007766.2024.2320589 (DOI)001173462800001 ()2-s2.0-85186861776 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-06449
Available from: 2024-03-19 Created: 2024-03-19 Last updated: 2024-04-29Bibliographically approved
Muchitsch, V. & Werner, A. (2024). The Mediation of Genre, Identity, and Difference in Contemporary (Popular) Music Streaming. Twentieth Century Music, 1-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Mediation of Genre, Identity, and Difference in Contemporary (Popular) Music Streaming
2024 (English)In: Twentieth Century Music, ISSN 1478-5722, E-ISSN 1478-5730, p. 1-27Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Music streaming service Spotify has recently declared that genre is becoming less important in popular music culture, linking this idea to post-identity claims. In contrast, the central argument of this article is that genre continues to matter in music streaming, where algorithmic recommendation systems remediate genre and its association with constructions of identity and difference. We examine Spotify's mediation of genre through a multimodal discourse analysis of genre metadata as presented on the website Every Noise at Once, playlist curation, and media discourse. Analysing the genres bubblegrunge and rap français (French rap), we show that the algorithmic and human processes of Spotify and its users rearticulate genre, shaping, in turn, patterns of recommendation, curation, and consumption. These processes remediate earlier constructions of identity, temporality, and place in music culture. Simultaneously, they intensify differentiation and individuation, tying in with postulations of multiplicity and diversity in neoliberalism that conceal power imbalances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2024
National Category
Humanities and the Arts Social Sciences
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53559 (URN)10.1017/s1478572223000270 (DOI)001162043000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-06449
Available from: 2024-02-16 Created: 2024-02-16 Last updated: 2024-03-15Bibliographically approved
Muchitsch, V. (2023). “Genrefluid” Spotify Playlists and Mediations of Genre and Identity in Music Streaming. IASPM@Journal, 13(3), 48-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Genrefluid” Spotify Playlists and Mediations of Genre and Identity in Music Streaming
2023 (English)In: IASPM@Journal, E-ISSN 2079-3871, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 48-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent popular discourse has claimed that music and listeners’ tastes are becoming increasingly “genrefluid” in popular music culture, and this idea has been linked to the logics of music streaming services. This article analyzes the Spotify-curated playlist Lorem, which has been presented by the company as a primary illustration of “genrefluid” music curation and listening, to investigate Spotify’s mediations of genre and identity at the intersections of media discourse, genre metadata, and curated sound. I discuss how the idea of genrefluidity links post-genre and post-identity discourses to the technocultural logics of algorithmic recommendation. At the same time, Spotify’s mediation of genre remediates earlier hegemonic associations between genre and identity in popular music culture. This article concludes that musical categorization in music streaming does not transcend genre and identity but is characterized by ambivalent mappings of genre and identity mediated by the logics of algorithmic technologies. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Association for the Study of Popular Music, 2023
Keywords
algorithmic recommendation, gender, genre, identity, music streaming, Popular music
National Category
Musicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53329 (URN)10.5429/2079-3871(2023)V13I3.5EN (DOI)2-s2.0-85182350483 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-06449
Available from: 2024-01-23 Created: 2024-01-23 Last updated: 2024-01-23Bibliographically approved
Muchitsch, V. (2023). Listening to Anohni's variously vibrating voice: studying transfeminine vocality in 21st-century popular music culture through the concept of vocal figurations. Popular Music, 42(1), 59-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Listening to Anohni's variously vibrating voice: studying transfeminine vocality in 21st-century popular music culture through the concept of vocal figurations
2023 (English)In: Popular Music, ISSN 0261-1430, E-ISSN 1474-0095, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the work and reception of singer-songwriter Anohni to investigate sonic and discursive negotiations of transfeminine vocality in 21st-century popular music culture. Developing Haraway's concept of feminist figurations, it introduces the concept of vocal figurations, which articulates a performative, relational and multiply mediated understanding of voice, wherein gendered voice takes shape through processes of voicing and listening. I initially examine Anohni's reception to analyse how biologist, trans-exclusionary and othering discourses surrounding voice and gender inform emergent discourses of transfeminine voices in the first decades of the 21st century. Subsequently, I build on trans and queer theorisations of voice and listening to engage Anohni's variably vibrating voice as a vocal figuration that may challenge biologist and marginalising constructions of transfeminine vocality. I suggest that it may attune us to recognise all gendered voices as thoroughly situated yet changeable configurations of sounding voices, bodies, and subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2023
National Category
Musicology Gender Studies
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory; Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-51479 (URN)10.1017/S0261143023000107 (DOI)000969405200001 ()2-s2.0-85162138486 (Scopus ID)
Note

Available from: 2023-05-12 Created: 2023-05-12 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Projects
Feeling ourselves? Sound, affect and female subjectivity in music streaming [2020-06449_VR]; Södertörn University; Publications
Muchitsch, V. & Werner, A. (2024). The Mediation of Genre, Identity, and Difference in Contemporary (Popular) Music Streaming. Twentieth Century Music, 1-27
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1505-4357

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