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Normark, Maria
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Hansson, K., Bardzell, S., Bhandari, A., Boulicault, M., Doyle, D. T., Erete, S., . . . Watson, J. (2023). A Toolbox of Feminist Wonder: Theories and Methods That Can Make a Difference. In: Casey Fiesler; Loren Terveen; Morgan Ames; Susan Fussell; Eric Gilbert; Vera Liao; Xiaojuan Ma; Xinru Page; Mark Rouncefield; Vivek Singh; Pamela Wisniewski (Ed.), CSCW ’23 Companion: Companion Publication of the 2023 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Paper presented at CSCW ’23, Minneapolis, October 14-18, 2023. (pp. 476-480). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Toolbox of Feminist Wonder: Theories and Methods That Can Make a Difference
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2023 (English)In: CSCW ’23 Companion: Companion Publication of the 2023 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing / [ed] Casey Fiesler; Loren Terveen; Morgan Ames; Susan Fussell; Eric Gilbert; Vera Liao; Xiaojuan Ma; Xinru Page; Mark Rouncefield; Vivek Singh; Pamela Wisniewski, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 476-480Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This one-day hybrid workshop builds on previous feminist CSCW workshops to explore feminist theoretical and methodological approaches that have provided us with useful tools to see things differently and make space for change. Since its inception over a decade ago, feminist HCI has progressed from the margins to mainstream HCI, with numerous references in the literature. Feminist HCI has also evolved to incorporate other critical HCI practices such as Queer HCI, participatory design, and speculative design. While feminist approaches have grown in popularity and become mainstream, it is getting more difficult to distinguish the feminist emancipatory core from other attempts of developing and improving society in various ways. In this workshop, we therefore want to revisit our feminist roots, where theory is a liberatory and creative practice, motivated by affect, curiosity, and wonder. From this standpoint, we consider which of our feminist tools can make a significant difference today, in a highly datafied world. The goal of this workshop is to; 1) create an inventory of feminist theories and concepts that have had an impact on our work as designers, educators, researchers, and activists; 2) develop a feminist toolbox for the CSCW community to strengthen our feminist literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023
Keywords
Care, Feminist HCI, Intersectionality, Decolonization, Feminist wonder
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-52584 (URN)10.1145/3584931.3611295 (DOI)2-s2.0-85176250268 (Scopus ID)979-8-4007-0129-0 (ISBN)
Conference
CSCW ’23, Minneapolis, October 14-18, 2023.
Available from: 2023-10-30 Created: 2023-10-30 Last updated: 2023-11-22Bibliographically approved
Normark, M., Hansson, K. & Jacobsson, M. (2023). Defending human rights in the era of datafication. In: AoIR Selected Papers of Internet Research: . Paper presented at AoIR2023: The 24th Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers Philadelphia, PA, USA, October 18-21, 2023.. The Association of Internet Researchers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Defending human rights in the era of datafication
2023 (English)In: AoIR Selected Papers of Internet Research, The Association of Internet Researchers , 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we explore how activists and human rights defenders deal with datafication. This work demonstrates how data can be a valuable resource in activism and campaign planning. In addition, data and lack of data also complicate daily life for people in vulnerable positions, for example, when contacting government agencies, schools, and medical facilities . Data from four types of human rights activism formed the basis of our analysis. They include volunteers and employees of NGOs dealing with refugee and migrant issues, homelessness, poverty, sexual minorities, and women's shelters. The study was done in Sweden, where the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) laws limit the handling and storage of personal data. The following five major themes emerge from the analysis of data from our interview study: Affording personal integrity, Data poverty, Protective data practices, Drawing attention to data, and Systems and data routines. In addition, this study shows how activists and the organizations that they support are exposed to contradictory aspects of data; on one hand, deliberately exposing data about marginalized/minoritized groups, while on the other, making sure those groups, along with activists themselves, are not exposed. Most important, the data laws and regulations are not adjusted to the needs of the most vulnerable in society, and therefore, actions of civil disobedience are necessary to care for vulnerable populations through data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Association of Internet Researchers, 2023
Series
AoIR Selected Papers of Internet Research, E-ISSN 2162-3317 ; 2023
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-53704 (URN)10.5210/spir.v2023i0.13473 (DOI)
Conference
AoIR2023: The 24th Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers Philadelphia, PA, USA, October 18-21, 2023.
Available from: 2024-03-19 Created: 2024-03-19 Last updated: 2024-03-19Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, S., Olsson, O. & Normark, M. (2022). "I feel like I’ve never really achieved it": A critical analysis of persuasive design patterns in mindfulness applications. In: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference (NordiCHI ’22): October 08–12, 2022, Aarhus, Denmark. Paper presented at NordiCHI 2022: Participative computing for sustainable futures, Aarhus, Denmark, October 8-12, 2022.. New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 61.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I feel like I’ve never really achieved it": A critical analysis of persuasive design patterns in mindfulness applications
2022 (English)In: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference (NordiCHI ’22): October 08–12, 2022, Aarhus, Denmark, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, article id 61Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines experiences of mindfulness and meditationapplications for handling stress and emotional strain. We presenta qualitative interview study. The analysis focuses particularly onthe role of persuasive functions in the applications, such as notifications,history tracking, maintaining a daily streak, etc. Theresults suggest that persuasive design patterns can interfere withthe original user needs. While providing some advantages for supportingthe establishment of a meditation habit, persuasive designpatterns also create friction between the application and the users’intentions to reduce stress. We critically examine how persuasivedesign patterns, intended for increasing performance and personalimprovement, may affect the users of meditation apps. Finally, wediscuss how persuasive design patterns in the major meditationapps have been instrumental in recontextualizing meditation froma spiritual practice to a productivity practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-49895 (URN)10.1145/3546155.3546678 (DOI)2-s2.0-85140890424 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-9699-8 (ISBN)
Conference
NordiCHI 2022: Participative computing for sustainable futures, Aarhus, Denmark, October 8-12, 2022.
Available from: 2022-09-13 Created: 2022-09-13 Last updated: 2024-05-28Bibliographically approved
Poikolainen Rosén, A., Normark, M. & Wiberg, M. (2022). Noticing the Environment: A Design Ethnography of Urban Farming. In: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference (NordiCHI ’22): October 08–12, 2022, Aarhus, Denmark. Paper presented at NordiCHI 2022: Participative computing for sustainable futures, Aarhus, Denmark, October 8-12, 2022.. New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 34.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Noticing the Environment: A Design Ethnography of Urban Farming
2022 (English)In: Nordic Human-Computer Interaction Conference (NordiCHI ’22): October 08–12, 2022, Aarhus, Denmark, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022, article id 34Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Sustainable HCI attempts to shift focus beyond humans, to care for both ourselves and our environment. In this paper, we build on this growing interest and contribute with a design ethnography of urban farming. We focus on practices of observing and gathering data about the environment which we frame as ‘noticing’. In our analysis, three approaches to noticing the environment were iden- tified, and design suggestions were developed for each approach: Green Thumbs (control-oriented), Dirty Nails (sensibility-oriented) and BeeNoculars (appreciation-oriented). The design suggestions, presented as posters, focus on ways to improve the alignment of the acquisition and display of data with the identified approaches. We discuss two themes: the noticing and balancing of systemic rela- tions and needs, and sensory-rich experiences of the environment. The paper contributes to a broader discussion in HCI of how tech- nologies could create a different understanding of and relationship to the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2022
Keywords
Noticing, Environmental Sensing, Ethnography, Urban farming
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-49774 (URN)10.1145/3546155.3546659 (DOI)2-s2.0-85140921236 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-9699-8 (ISBN)
Conference
NordiCHI 2022: Participative computing for sustainable futures, Aarhus, Denmark, October 8-12, 2022.
Available from: 2022-08-31 Created: 2022-08-31 Last updated: 2024-02-02Bibliographically approved
Poikolainen Rosén, A., Normark, M. & Wiberg, M. (2022). Towards More-than-Human-Centred Design: Learning from Gardening. International Journal of Design, 16(3), 21-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards More-than-Human-Centred Design: Learning from Gardening
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

More-than-human-centred design is a growing field in HCI (human-computer interaction) that account for non-human actors in design processes (such as animals, plants, and microbes but also autonomous technologies). While the rationale for more-than-human-centred design is clear, there is a lack of design methods grounded in this thinking. We articulate the idea of noticing as a method for approaching design spaces as systems of mutual interdependence between organisms. The findings are based on a longitudinal ethnographic study of urban farming—including the study of urban farmers’ practices and use of technologies with a focus on the interplay between humans and non-humans, such as plants and microbes. We articulate noticing as a phenomenon and show examples of urban farmers’ practices of noticing. We discuss principles for designing with the interdependencies of several organisms based on what is noticed in a setting. We argue that the way we have separated ideas about the environment and human experience is a part of the sustainability problem—and suggest noticing as an approach that instead combines positive human experiences and the needs of the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 2022
National Category
Human Aspects of ICT Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-49880 (URN)10.57698/v16i3.02 (DOI)000971411500002 ()2-s2.0-85146177404 (Scopus ID)
Note

As manuscript in dissertation

Available from: 2022-09-06 Created: 2022-09-09 Last updated: 2023-05-12Bibliographically approved
Normark, M., Poikolainen Rosén, A. & Bonow, M. (2021). Articulating and Negotiating Boundaries in Urban Farming Communities. In: C&T '21: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Communities & Technologies: Wicked Problems in the Age of Tech. Paper presented at C&T '21, Seattle, WA, USA, June 20-25, 2021. (pp. 298-308). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Articulating and Negotiating Boundaries in Urban Farming Communities
2021 (English)In: C&T '21: Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Communities & Technologies: Wicked Problems in the Age of Tech, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021, p. 298-308Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In urban farming communities, enthusiasts adopt urban land and cooperatively develop the space with organic cultivations. This kind of gardening is guided by several ideals, which are part of the farmers’ motivation. However, gardening alone cannot meet the requirements for establishing a community in the city environment. The activities and ideals of the urban farms need to be negotiated and articulated to various stakeholders, including local establishments, other citizens, and city governments. Based on a three-year field study of urban community farms in three countries, we describe how the negotiation and articulation of the organizational, material, and ideological boundaries unfolded both internally and externally in these communities. We provide concrete empirical examples of how such communities develop, what their challenges are, and how they can be supported by technology. We use the lens of civic engagement as a point of departure to situate urban farming and community technologies as a phenomenon. The main contributions of this paper are accounts of the kind of articulation work that volunteer-based civic engagement communities face and design qualities related to this boundary articulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2021
Keywords
Civic engagement, Articulation work, Boundaries, Urban community farming
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-45402 (URN)10.1145/3461564.3461565 (DOI)2-s2.0-85109371477 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-9056-9 (ISBN)
Conference
C&T '21, Seattle, WA, USA, June 20-25, 2021.
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2021-05-19 Created: 2021-05-19 Last updated: 2022-11-03Bibliographically approved
Tholander, J. & Normark, M. (2020). Crafting Personal Information - Resistance, Imperfection, and Self-Creation in Bullet Journaling. In: Regina Bernhaupt and Florian ‘Floyd’ Mueller, David Verweij, Josh Andres (Ed.), CHI '20: Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI '20: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Honolulu HI USA April 25-30, 2020. New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 283.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crafting Personal Information - Resistance, Imperfection, and Self-Creation in Bullet Journaling
2020 (English)In: CHI '20: Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems / [ed] Regina Bernhaupt and Florian ‘Floyd’ Mueller, David Verweij, Josh Andres, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, article id 283Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
Bullet journaling, crafts, personal informatics, imperfection, self-creation, analogue materials, making by hand
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-41925 (URN)10.1145/3313831.3376410 (DOI)2-s2.0-85091289219 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-6708-0 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI '20: CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Honolulu HI USA April 25-30, 2020
Available from: 2020-09-23 Created: 2020-09-23 Last updated: 2020-10-01Bibliographically approved
Bonow, M., Normark, M. & Lossien, S. (2020). Offering urban spaces for community gardens: Implementation, development, and resilience in Stockholm, Sweden. Socialni Studia/Social Studies, 17(1), 71-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Offering urban spaces for community gardens: Implementation, development, and resilience in Stockholm, Sweden
2020 (English)In: Socialni Studia/Social Studies, ISSN 1214-813X, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 71-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One way of using public green spaces is to allow cultivation by citizens. Community gardening has proven to have many social benefits and can undoubtedly contribute to a sustainable society in a variety of ways. Yet while being clearly attractive for both citizens and officials, it does not always flourish in practice. In this study we draw on interviews with park engineers working in the city of Stockholm to analyze why community gardening is not more prevalent, despite the clearly existing political and popular will to promote it. The study shows that there are significant differences between Stockholm City's district administrations. Through applying implementation theory, we show that relatively small variations in local resources, expertise, and interests fundamentally shape the outcome of community gardening initiatives. It is also shown that unclear guidelines and a lack of horizontal and vertical communication constitute institutional barriers to the implementation, development, and resilience of community gardening in the districts of Stockholm. © 2020 Masaryk University.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brno: Masaryk University, 2020
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-41625 (URN)10.5817/SOC2020-1-71 (DOI)2-s2.0-85087902990 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 72/14
Available from: 2020-07-27 Created: 2020-07-27 Last updated: 2021-04-07Bibliographically approved
Poikolainen Rosén, A., Normark, M. & Wiberg, M. (2020). Relating to the Environment Through Photography: The Smartphone Camera as a Tool in Urban Farming. In: Proceedings of the 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer-Interaction (OzCHI 2020): . Paper presented at OzCHI 2020: 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer-Interaction, Online, December 2-4, 2020. (pp. 506-519). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relating to the Environment Through Photography: The Smartphone Camera as a Tool in Urban Farming
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of the 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer-Interaction (OzCHI 2020), New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020, p. 506-519Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research on environmental sustainability in HCI is investigating the opportunities and hindrances technologies pose on living sustainably, beyond direct material impact of production, use and disposal. With this background, we focus on the smartphone camera as a tool that allows users to quickly and relatively effortlessly depict, save, share, access, augment or amplify information about the environment. Based on two years of participant observation studies, we present examples of how urban farmers use the smartphone camera as a tool in their practice. We discuss how the smartphone camera mediates human experiences of the environment and how certain uses of the camera may contribute to environmental sustainability. We highlight how the smartphone camera used as a tool in gardening was experienced to support (a) feelings of closeness or bonds towards the local environment and (b) the creation and sharing of knowledge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2020
Keywords
Technological mediation, Sustainability, Photography, Smartphone camera, Urban farming, Technology adoption
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-42304 (URN)10.1145/3441000.3441026 (DOI)2-s2.0-85101744642 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-8975-4 (ISBN)
Conference
OzCHI 2020: 32nd Australian Conference on Human-Computer-Interaction, Online, December 2-4, 2020.
Available from: 2020-12-04 Created: 2020-12-04 Last updated: 2022-09-09Bibliographically approved
Josefsson, P., Green, A. & Normark, M. (2019). Students' perception of feedback using peer review as a pedagogical method to increase academic writing skills in higher education. In: : . Paper presented at INTED2019, the 13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, 11-13 March, 2019, Valencia, Spain. (pp. 513-519).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' perception of feedback using peer review as a pedagogical method to increase academic writing skills in higher education
2019 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study explores how students within higher education perceive different types of peer review feedback and how that feedback affects their learning. The study builds on a previous paper [1] where the Blackboard peer assessment tool was used, and compared three feedback conditions: positive, mixed, and negative. The findings strongly indicated that students preferred negative feedback, corresponding to earlier research showing that experienced students seem to benefit from negative feedback [2].

To explore the students perception on feedback, we designed an academic course to incorporate peer review assessment. The course was held during autumn 2018 and included 75 bachelor students. Students were required to individually complete a set of four review assignments using the school’s learning management system, ITs learning (ITs). Each of the four peer review assignments were designed to represent a different approach to feedback. The first assignment instructed the students to only give positive feedback in the review process; e.g., “choose three things that are positive”. The second assignment had instructions without suggesting valence in the feedback and asked the students to “examine how the argumentation is included in the text”. The third assignment instructed the students to provide negative feedback, by asking them to “point towards at least three areas for improvement”. The fourth assignment instructed the students to validate the feasibility of a written research proposal by their study peer, again without suggesting a valence of positive or negative. By consciously designing the four peer review assignments to produce specific kinds of feedback, we aimed to learn more about how the students experience such different types of peer review.

Based on focus group interviews, we have so far found that the students perceive it harder to give positive compared than negative feedback. They also perceive giving feedback, rather than receiving feedback, as a more important experience in learning. The latter will be especially interesting when compared against earlier research [3] which showed that providing peer feedback had several potential learning benefits for the provider. A preliminary finding of our study is that the transition from earlier levels of design critique during digital development projects to academically founded criticism and review requires careful instructions and pedagogic considerations. In order to further evaluate the students' experience, a questionnaire will be distributed at the end of the course (end of Oct. 2018).

The findings presented in this study aim to work as a backdrop for future discussions about how to design peer-review assignments in higher education to increase students’ academic literacy.

References:

[1] Kidd, J., Hankins, M., “The effects of peer review in students learning: a comparison of positive and negative feedback.”. 10th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, Valencia, Spain, March 7-9, 2016.

[2] Fishbach, A., Eyal, T., & Finkelstein, S. R., “How positive and negative feedback motivate goal pursuit.” in Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 4(8), 517-530, 2010.

[3] Van Popta, E., Kral, M., Camp, G., Martens, R. L., & Simons, P. R. J., “Exploring the value of peer feedback in online learning for the provider.” in Educational Research Review, 20, 24-34, 2017.

Series
INTED2019 Proceedings, ISSN 2340-1079
Keywords
peer review, higher education, feedback
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39452 (URN)10.21125/inted.2019.0202 (DOI)978-84-09-08619-1 (ISBN)
Conference
INTED2019, the 13th International Technology, Education and Development Conference, 11-13 March, 2019, Valencia, Spain.
Available from: 2019-11-27 Created: 2019-11-27 Last updated: 2021-10-13Bibliographically approved
Projects
Nomadic Interaction Models: On Adoption and Adaption of Mobile Technologies [2009-04086_VINNOVA]; Södertörn UniversitySustainable Communities through Digital Design [72/2014_OSS]; Södertörn University; Publications
Norton, J., Raturi, A., Nardi, B., Prost, S., McDonald, S., Pargman, D., . . . Dombrowski, L. (2017). A Grand Challenge for HCI: Food + Sustainability. interactions, 24(6), 50-55
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