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Sternäng, O., Palmer, K., Kabir, Z. N., Hasan, M. I. & Wahlin, Å. (2019). Associations Between Functional Biological Age and Cognition Among Older Adults in Rural Bangladesh: Comparisons With Chronological Age. Journal of Aging and Health, 31(5), 814-836
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations Between Functional Biological Age and Cognition Among Older Adults in Rural Bangladesh: Comparisons With Chronological Age
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Aging and Health, ISSN 0898-2643, E-ISSN 1552-6887, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 814-836Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: We constructed a functional biological age (fBioAge) indicator by using four functional variables: grip strength, forced expiratory lung volume, visual acuity, and hearing. Our aim was to compare how chronological age (ChronAge) and fBioAge are related to cognitive abilities in older adults.

METHOD: We used data from the Poverty and Health in Aging project, Bangladesh. Participants ( N = 400) were 60+ years of age and diagnosed as nondemented. Examined cognitive abilities were four episodic memory measures (including recall and recognition), two verbal fluency indicators, two semantic knowledge, and two processing speed tasks.

RESULTS: fBioAge accounted for cognitive variance beyond that explained by ChronAge also after controlling for medical diagnoses and blood markers.

DISCUSSION: Compared with ChronAge, fBioAge was a stronger predictor of cognition during a broad part of the old adult span. fBioAge seems, in that respect, to have the potential to become a useful age indicator in future aging studies.

Keywords
age indicator, cognitive abilities, cross-sectional
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34619 (URN)10.1177/0898264318757147 (DOI)000466424300005 ()29441812 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042099239 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2011-1621Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Finkel, D., Sternäng, O., Jylhävä, J., Bai, G. & Pedersen, N. L. (2019). Functional Aging Index Complements Frailty in Prediction of Entry into Care and Mortality.. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 74(12), 1980-1986
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional Aging Index Complements Frailty in Prediction of Entry into Care and Mortality.
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2019 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 74, no 12, p. 1980-1986Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The aim was to develop a functional aging index (FAI) that taps four body systems: sensory (vision and hearing), pulmonary, strength (grip strength), and movement/balance (gait speed) and to test the predictive value of FAI for entry into care and mortality.

METHOD: Growth curve models and cox regression models were applied to data from 1695 individuals from three Swedish longitudinal studies of aging. Participants were aged 45 to 93 at intake and data from up to 8 follow-up waves were available.

RESULTS: The rate of change in FAI was twice as fast after age 75 as before, women demonstrated higher mean FAI, but no sex differences in rates of change with chronological age were identified. FAI predicted entry into care and mortality, even when chronological age and a frailty index were included in the models. Hazard ratios indicated FAI was a more important predictor of entry into care for men than women; whereas it was a stronger predictor of mortality for men than women.

CONCLUSIONS: Measures of biological aging and functional aging differ in their predictive value for entry into care and mortality for men and women, suggesting that both are necessary for a complete picture of the aging process across genders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
gender, latent growth curve, survival analysis
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38498 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glz155 (DOI)000501737700020 ()31222213 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-12-27Bibliographically approved
Bjursell, C., Nystedt, P., Björklund, A. & Sternäng, O. (2017). Education level explains participation in work and education later in life. Educational gerontology, 43(10), 511-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education level explains participation in work and education later in life
2017 (English)In: Educational gerontology, ISSN 0360-1277, E-ISSN 1521-0472, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A prolonged working life is crucial for sustaining social welfare and fiscal stability for countries facing ageing populations. The group of older adults is not homogeneous; however, differences within the group may affect the propensity to continue working and to participate in continuing education. The aim of this paper is to explore how participation in work and education vary with gender, age, and education level in a sample of older adults. The study was performed in Sweden, a context characterized by high female labour-market-participation rates and a high average retirement age. The participants were 232 members of four of the major senior citizens’ organizations. We found no differences in participation in work and education based on gender. People older than 75 years were found to be as active as people 65–75 years old in education, but the older group worked less. There were positive associations between education level and participation in both work and education. Hence, this study implies that socio-economic inequalities along these dimensions are widened later in life. This highlights the importance of engaging workers with lower education levels in educational efforts throughout life. It also emphasizes the need for true lifelong learning in society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2017
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33212 (URN)10.1080/03601277.2017.1357397 (DOI)000413908900004 ()2-s2.0-85028559458 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
Fagerström, C., Sandin Wranker, L., Kabir, Z. N. & Sternäng, O. (2017). Everyday Health among Older People: A Comparison between Two Countries with Variant Life Conditions. Journal of Aging Research, Article ID 2720942.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Everyday Health among Older People: A Comparison between Two Countries with Variant Life Conditions
2017 (English)In: Journal of Aging Research, ISSN 2090-2204, E-ISSN 2090-2212, p. -8, article id 2720942Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study described health factors of importance for everyday health, such as pain, tiredness, and sleeping problems, in a cross-national context. Data for persons 60+ years were obtained from the Poverty and Health in Aging study, Bangladesh, and the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Blekinge. The strongest associations with everyday health in Sweden were found for pain and tiredness, while in Bangladesh they were financial status, tiredness, and sleeping problems. As similarities were found regarding the associations of tiredness on everyday health, tiredness may be a universal predictor of everyday health in older adults irrespective of country context.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33213 (URN)10.1155/2017/2720942 (DOI)28875042 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85028308831 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-29 Created: 2017-08-29 Last updated: 2017-09-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1599-0444

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