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Berglund, J. (2017). Continuity and Change: Experiences of Teaching Religious Education in the Light of a Life Trajectory of Hifz and Secular Education. Religion & Education, 44(1), 88-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Continuity and Change: Experiences of Teaching Religious Education in the Light of a Life Trajectory of Hifz and Secular Education
2017 (English)In: Religion & Education, ISSN 1550-7394, E-ISSN 1949-8381, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, microhistory is used to (1) bring understanding to some of the educational, but also social and political questions that at present surround Muslims schools and Islamic Education in England; and (2) to question oft created dichotomy between Islamic and secular education, by bringing forward an educational journey, consistent of both Islamic education and secular education. The focus lies on the life of a British hafiz who works as a religious education teacher at a Muslim school in East London.

Keywords
Hifz, Islamic education, religious education
National Category
Religious Studies Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36756 (URN)10.1080/15507394.2016.1267544 (DOI)000424576500007 ()2-s2.0-85010703520 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2018-11-19Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J. (2017). Education Policy – A Swedish Success Story?: Integration of Newly Arrived Students Into the Swedish School System. Berlin: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education Policy – A Swedish Success Story?: Integration of Newly Arrived Students Into the Swedish School System
2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 2017. p. 11
Series
International Policy Analysis ; February 2017
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32464 (URN)978-3-95861-767-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-04Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J. (2017). Secular normativity and the religification of Muslims in Swedish public schooling. Oxford Review of Education, 43(5), 524-535
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secular normativity and the religification of Muslims in Swedish public schooling
2017 (English)In: Oxford Review of Education, ISSN 0305-4985, E-ISSN 1465-3915, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 524-535Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article suggests that the secular norms which influence much of the Swedish school system silence the voices and experiences of young Muslims who also attend Islamic supplementary education. It is based on interviews with 20 Muslim students in Sweden who reflected on their experiences of attending supplementary Islamic education in parallel to their secular schooling. Despite the variety of Islamic education reported by the students, they all held in common that they had learned to read and memorise the Quran as part of their Islamic education. A majority of the students reported that they avoid mentioning their Islamic education classes and their memorisation skills in secular schools since the reaction of teachers has proved to be negative. Those who mentioned that they attended supplementary religious education classes were immediately classified as ‘too religious’, a category that most wanted to avoid. The article shows that to memorise a sacred text stands in stark contrast to much of the educational ideals that prevail in Swedish modern schooling, where a discourse of secular normativity prevails. By using an identity economics model I show that what is perceived as prestigious and rewarding in the Muslim context risks being turned into a cost in the setting of a secular school.

Keywords
Islamic education; Quran education; Sweden; identity economics
National Category
Religious Studies Educational Sciences
Research subject
Historical Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33115 (URN)10.1080/03054985.2017.1352349 (DOI)000413974700002 ()2-s2.0-85026747933 (Scopus ID)958/3.1.1/2014 (Local ID)958/3.1.1/2014 (Archive number)958/3.1.1/2014 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-6423
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J. (2017). The Study of Islamic Education: A Litmus Test on State Relations to Muslim Minorities. In: Steffen Führding (Ed.), Method and Theory in the Study of Religion: Working Papers from Hannover (pp. 232-258). Brill Academic Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Study of Islamic Education: A Litmus Test on State Relations to Muslim Minorities
2017 (Swedish)In: Method and Theory in the Study of Religion: Working Papers from Hannover / [ed] Steffen Führding, Brill Academic Publishers, 2017, p. 232-258Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper I argue that it is possible to understand publicly funded religious education as a litmus test for church-state-society relations and that the specific study of publicly funded Islamic education can be seen as a litmus test for the relation between various Western democracies and their Muslim minority populations.[1] I will compare and analyze state funded Islamic education in eight European countries pointing to the transformations and adaptations that Muslim communities have, on different levels, done to fit into each educational setting. The presentation shows that issues of integration, social cohesion, but also Islamophobia in each national setting affect what in the end becomes Islamic education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2017
Series
Supplements to Method & Theory in the Study of Religion, ISSN 2214-3270 ; 8
Keywords
Islam, Islamic Education, Religious Education, Minority Rights
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Historical Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33116 (URN)10.1163/9789004347878_012 (DOI)958/3.1.1/2014 (Local ID)9789004347878 (ISBN)9789004347861 (ISBN)958/3.1.1/2014 (Archive number)958/3.1.1/2014 (OAI)
Available from: 2017-08-15 Created: 2017-08-15 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Ackfeldt, A., Berglund, J., Brusi, F., Cato, J., Dogan, G., Fazlhashemi, M., . . . Törning, L. (2017). Undermålig forskning i svensk myndighetsrapport.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undermålig forskning i svensk myndighetsrapport
Show others...
2017 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37137 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-31 Created: 2018-12-31 Last updated: 2019-01-02Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J. (2016). On the Borders: Religious Education in Northern Europe. Paper presented at XIII Nordic Conference on Religious Education "Shifting borders in religious education". Usuteaduslik ajakiri, 69(1), 9-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Borders: Religious Education in Northern Europe
2016 (English)In: Usuteaduslik ajakiri, ISSN 1406-6564, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 9-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Around the world, many schools are situated close to a territorial border. In such a situation it is possible, and in some areas probable, that students and teachers interact with people from the other side of the territorial border on a daily or weekly basis. These interactions influence peoples’ lives, but how do they affect education? Does a close relation to a territorial neighbour mean that the culture and religion of the territorial Other is taken into consideration in teaching? Or is education, despite the recommendations on the supranational level, a purely national product?  These issues are addressed in this paper, which empirical material comes from on a cross disciplinary project focusing on religious education in four border areas around the Baltic Sea.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tartu: Akadeemiline Teoloogia Selts, 2016
Keywords
religious education, borders, schools
National Category
Religious Studies Educational Sciences
Research subject
Historical Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29763 (URN)
Conference
XIII Nordic Conference on Religious Education "Shifting borders in religious education"
Note

Specialnummer på engelska. Theological journal, Special issue “Shifting borders in Religious Education”

Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-05-29Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J., Lundén, T. & Strandbrink, P. (Eds.). (2015). Crossings and crosses: Borders, educations, and religions in northern Europe (1ed.). Boston: Walter de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crossings and crosses: Borders, educations, and religions in northern Europe
2015 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Boston: Walter de Gruyter, 2015. p. 241 Edition: 1
Series
Religion and society, ISSN 1427-5370 ; 63
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-27168 (URN)978-1-61451-655-2 (ISBN)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2015-05-04 Created: 2015-05-04 Last updated: 2017-06-27Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J. (2015). Publicly Funded Islamic Education in Europe and the United States. Washington
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Publicly Funded Islamic Education in Europe and the United States
2015 (English)Report (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Islamic religious education in the United States and Europe has become a subject of intense debate after Muslims raised in the West carried out attacks against their fellow citizens. People worry their governments are doing too little or too much to shape the spiritual beliefs of private citizens. In a new analysis paper, Jenny Berglund explains the differences in publicly funded Islamic education in nine European countries and the United States. 

Berglund lays out the religious education framework of each country and explains the state policies governing the teaching of Islam in public schools. State involvement, Berglund writes, ranges from sponsoring religious education in public schools to forgoing it entirely. The policies vary according to the national political culture of each country, as well as the historical and religious norms that shape public perceptions and debates over religious education. 

In Germany and Austria, many public schools teach Islam to Muslims as a subject within a broader religious curriculum in which parents can choose their students’ religious courses. In the United Kingdom and Sweden, public schools teach Islam as an academic subject, and train teachers through comparative religious studies departments in universities. French and U.S. public schools do not teach religion, although students can lean about Islam in subjects such as art, history, or literature.

Despite the diversity of these approaches, Berglund notes three good practices that apply across the board:

  1. Establishing rigorous academic standards of training for teachers of religious education courses.
  2. Providing factual textbooks informed by academic scholarship, both for Islamic religious education and non-confessional school subjects that teach about Islam. 
  3. Building upon current curricular and pedagological best practices through international exchange and dialogue of scholars.

By adopting these practices, Berglund argues, governments can further their citizens’ knowledge of important aspects of the human experience and promote inclusive citizenship and respect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington: , 2015. p. 49
Series
The Brookings Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World. Analysis Paper ; 21
Keywords
Islamic education, Muslim schools, Islamic religious education, social cohesion, islamophobia
National Category
Religious Studies Pedagogical Work Globalisation Studies
Research subject
Historical Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26799 (URN)
Available from: 2015-04-05 Created: 2015-04-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Berglund, J. (2015). Sweden’s protests against Islamophobia highlight the polarised views of Swedish citizens toward Muslims. LSE EUROPP – European Politics and Policy Blog
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sweden’s protests against Islamophobia highlight the polarised views of Swedish citizens toward Muslims
2015 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

Protests have taken place in Sweden in recent weeks following a number of arson attacks on mosques in the country. Jenny Berglund writes on Sweden’s Muslim community and the varying attitudes among the Swedish population toward Islam. She notes that while there is evidence of increasing numbers of hate crimes against Swedish Muslims, the picture is complex, with a strong body of public opinion existing which is supportive of religious freedom and immigration.

Place, publisher, year, pages
LSE EUROPP – European Politics and Policy Blog, 2015
Keywords
Islam, islamophobia, Sweden, Muslims, hate crimes
National Category
Religious Studies
Research subject
Historical Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-25814 (URN)
Note

January 7th, 2015

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-13 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Sorgenfrei, S. & Berglund, J. (2015). Temaredaktörernas förord. Religion och livsfrågor (1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temaredaktörernas förord
2015 (Swedish)In: Religion och livsfrågor, ISSN 0347-2159, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26714 (URN)
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2017-10-06Bibliographically approved
Projects
Teaching religion and thinking education on the Baltic-Barent brim. [A051-2009_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityTeaching religion and thinking education on the Baltic-Barent Brim [2011-07525_VR]; Södertörn UniversityCultural and religious diversity in primary school (CARDIPS) [30/2013_OSS]; Södertörn University; Publications
Schihalejev, O., Kuusisto, A., Vikdahl, L. & Kallioniemi, A. (2019). Religion and children’s perceptions of bullying in multicultural schools in Estonia, Finland and Sweden. Journal of Beliefs and Values, 1-14Vikdahl, L. (2018). Det kommer inte på tal: En studie om religiös och kulturell mångfald i grundskolan. Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlagKuusisto, A., Straarup, J., Schihalejev, O., Kallionemi, A. & Vikdahl, L. (2018). Theoretical and methodological perspectives to studying religious and cultural diversity in Finnish, Swedish and Estonian comprehensive schools. In: Martin Ubani (Ed.), New international studies on religions and dialouge in education: (pp. 31-45). Münster: Waxmann VerlagSchihalejev, O. (2016). Religion in the school context: Freedom from or of religion?. In: : . Paper presented at Freedom of Religion or Belief in Situations of Crisis, Tallinn, 16.-18.June 2016. Schihalejev, O. (2016). What makes you happy? Drawings of 10-years old children in Estonia and Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at The International Seminar on Religious Education and Values, XX session:‘Values, Human Rights and Religious Education’ 31st July to 5th August 2016, University of St Mary of the Lake, Chicago, USA (pp. 51-52). Straarup, J. (2015). Importance of religion according to primary school students aged 10, 13 and 16. In: : . Paper presented at Earli 2015, Towards a reflective society, Limassol, GR, August 25—29, 2015.. Straarup, J. (2015). Importance of religion according to primary school students aged 10, 13 and 16: The problem of reliability. In: : . Paper presented at Religion and Dialogue in Europe: New research projects in the area of Education and Society, Klingenthal, FR, September 14—18, 2015.. Schihalejev, O. (2015). Shifting borders in religious education in Estonia. In: Berglund, Jenny; Lundén, Thomas; Strandbrink, Peter (Ed.), Crossings and Crosses: Borders, Educations, and Religions in Northern Europe (pp. 85-104). Boston / Berlin: Walter de GruyterSchihalejev, O. (2015). The structure and rationale of the research project CARDIPS. In: : . Paper presented at Religion and Dialogue in Europe: New research projects in the area of Education and Society, Klingenthal, FR, September 14—18, 2015.. Schihalejev, O. (2014). Secular youth in Estonia and they sacred world. In: HOLY CRAP -INTERSECTIONS OF THE POPULAR AND THE SACRED IN YOUTH CULTURES 28–29 August 2014, Helsinki, Finland: Presentations abstracts. Paper presented at Holy Crap - Intersections of the Popular and the Sacred in Youth Cultures, Helsinki, August 28-29, 2014. (pp. 15).
Religion and Politics in Antiquity and Modernity: Europe at the Crossroads [F14-0025:1_RJ]; Södertörn UniversityExperiences of Islamic and ´Western´ Education in Sweden and Britain [2014-06423_VR]; Södertörn University; Publications
Berglund, J. (2017). Secular normativity and the religification of Muslims in Swedish public schooling. Oxford Review of Education, 43(5), 524-535Berglund, J. (2017). The Study of Islamic Education: A Litmus Test on State Relations to Muslim Minorities. In: Steffen Führding (Ed.), Method and Theory in the Study of Religion: Working Papers from Hannover (pp. 232-258). Brill Academic Publishers
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9865-1869

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