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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Tulviste, T., Tõugu, P., Keller, H., Schröder, L. & De Geer, B. (2016). Children's and Mothers' Contribution to Joint Reminiscing in Different Sociocultural Contexts: Who Speaks and What is Said. Infant and Child Development, 25(1), 43-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's and Mothers' Contribution to Joint Reminiscing in Different Sociocultural Contexts: Who Speaks and What is Said
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2016 (English)In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 43-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study compares mothers' conversation with their 4-year-old children about two past events in two autonomy-oriented (35 German and 42 Swedish families), one relatedness-oriented (22 Cameroonian Nso families) and one autonomy-relatedness oriented (38 Estonian families) contexts. German mothers were rather similar to Swedish mothers in talking a lot, providing a lot of information and engaging children into conversation, but they differed from Swedish mothers by talking more about social content. Swedish children were more independent conversational partners to their mothers than other children, including German children. Estonian mothers' contribution to conversation was similar to Cameroonian Nso mothers, except that they asked a lot of open-ended questions to engage children in conversations. Estonian children did not differ from Swedish and German children in their contribution to conversations. Compared to Swedish mothers, past event talk of Estonian mothers was characterized by a bigger proportion of talk devoted to social content, but also to the child, mental states and non-social content. It was characteristic of Cameroonian Nso mothers that they focused more on other people and actions, and their conversational dominance was larger. Differences in reminiscing were consistent with different cultural models of self and the type of autonomy – psychological or action – promoted.

National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-27713 (URN)10.1002/icd.1921 (DOI)000369985600003 ()2-s2.0-84930392061 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 3000903
Available from: 2015-06-15 Created: 2015-06-15 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Tulviste, T., Tõugu, P., Keller, H., Schröder, L. & De Geer, B. (2013). Different Faces of Autonomy: Mother-Child Past Event Conversations Across Cultural Developmental Pathways. In: Therese M. S. Tchombe, A Bame Nsamenang, Heidi Keller, Márta Fülöp. (Ed.), Cross-cultural psychology: an Africentric perspective. Cameroon: Design House
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Faces of Autonomy: Mother-Child Past Event Conversations Across Cultural Developmental Pathways
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2013 (English)In: Cross-cultural psychology: an Africentric perspective / [ed] Therese M. S. Tchombe, A Bame Nsamenang, Heidi Keller, Márta Fülöp., Cameroon: Design House , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cameroon: Design House, 2013
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26965 (URN)9789956260690 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-04-22 Created: 2015-04-22 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved
Tougu, P., Tulviste, T., Schröder, L., Keller, H. & De Geer, B. (2012). Content of maternal open-ended questions and statements in reminiscing with their 4-year-olds: Links with independence and interdependence orientation in European contexts. Memory, 20(5), 499-510
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content of maternal open-ended questions and statements in reminiscing with their 4-year-olds: Links with independence and interdependence orientation in European contexts
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2012 (English)In: Memory, ISSN 0965-8211, E-ISSN 1464-0686, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 499-510Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mother's open-ended questions and elaborative statements during reminiscing were analysed for their content (child agency, co-agency, non-social, and social context) in three cultural contexts. Participants were 115 mothers and their 4-year-old children: 35 dyads from Berlin, Germany, 42 from Stockholm, Sweden, and 38 from Tallinn, Estonia. Across samples the most prominent content was talk about non-social context followed by co-agency and child agency. Tallinn mothers asked the children to talk about themselves, and Berlin mothers asked the children to talk about themselves together with other people, more frequently than they talked about these contents themselves. The content was related to the cultural orientations of mothers assessed through questionnaires: the Berlin mothers whose independence/ interdependence ratio was higher talked less about other people and asked the children fewer questions about other people; the Stockholm mothers with a higher independence/interdependence ratio talked more about child agency. In Tallinn both correlations existed on a trend level. The results are discussed in the light of common conversational practices and mothers' orientation to independence and interdependence in these cultural contexts.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-17755 (URN)10.1080/09658211.2012.683009 (DOI)000306210600009 ()2-s2.0-84863855366 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Tulviste, T., Mizera, L. & De Geer, B. (2012). Socialization Values in Stable and Changing Societies: A Comparative Study of Estonian, Swedish, and Russian Estonian Mothers. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 43(3), 480-497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socialization Values in Stable and Changing Societies: A Comparative Study of Estonian, Swedish, and Russian Estonian Mothers
2012 (English)In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, ISSN 0022-0221, E-ISSN 1552-5422, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 480-497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10987 (URN)10.1177/0022022111401393 (DOI)000301457000009 ()2-s2.0-84858190897 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Schröder, L., Keller, H., Tõugu, P., Tulviste, T., Lenk, M., Schwarzer, S., . . . De Geer, B. (2011). Cultural Expressions of Preschoolers' Emerging Self: Narrative and Iconic Representations. Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, 10(1), 77-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural Expressions of Preschoolers' Emerging Self: Narrative and Iconic Representations
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology, ISSN 1945-8959, E-ISSN 1810-7621, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 77-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10986 (URN)10.1891/1945&U8211;8959.10.1.77 (DOI)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tougu, P., Tulviste, T., Schroeder, L., Keller, H. & De Geer, B. (2011). Socialization of past event talk: Cultural differences in maternal elaborative reminiscing. Cognitive development, 26(2), 142-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socialization of past event talk: Cultural differences in maternal elaborative reminiscing
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2011 (English)In: Cognitive development, ISSN 0885-2014, E-ISSN 1879-226X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 142-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines mother-child reminiscing conversations with respect to variation in use and function of mothers' elaborations, the nature of children's memory elaborations, and the connections between the two, in three Western middle-class cultures where autonomy is valued over relatedness. Mothers participated with their 4-year-old children (35 dyads from Berlin, Germany, 42 dyads from Stockholm, Sweden, and 38 from Tallinn, Estonia). Mothers' open-ended questions predicted children's memory elaborations in Estonian dyads, mothers' statements and verbal confirmation did so in German dyads, and verbal confirmations did so in Swedish dyads. Number of children's elaborations was similar in all three groups, but Estonian mothers were less elaborative than Swedish and German mothers. These findings contrast with previous research in which number of child elaborations has been linked to number of mother elaborations. The results suggest that different aspects of elaborative style function differently. The differences are discussed in light of culturally rooted meanings and practices of talking.

National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10978 (URN)10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.12.004 (DOI)000291180800006 ()2-s2.0-79955484369 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tulviste, T., Mizera, L. & De Geer, B. (2011). "There is nothing bad in being talkative": Meanings of talkativeness in Estonian and Swedish adolescents. Journal of Pragmatics, 43(6), 1603-1609
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"There is nothing bad in being talkative": Meanings of talkativeness in Estonian and Swedish adolescents
2011 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 6, p. 1603-1609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study compared the meanings of talkativeness for 216 Estonian and 163 Swedish adolescents. Although both nations have stereotypically been described as taciturn, the results of the study suggested that Estonians differed from Swedes in having a more negative or neutral attitude towards talkativeness. Swedes, on the other hand, emphasized more frequently that the positive or negative interpretation of talkativeness depends on the person, on the topic, on the amount of talk, and on the situation. Both Estonian and Swedish adolescents regarded talk as a tool for communication with others rather than a tool for self-expression. Talking for communication with others dominated in the answers of Swedes, whereas Estonians mentioned talking as a tool for conveying information as frequently as a tool for communication with others.

National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10982 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2010.12.001 (DOI)000289400000012 ()2-s2.0-79952007927 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tulviste, T., Mizera, L., De Geer, B. & Tryggvason, M. (2010). Cultural, contextual, and gender differences in peer talk: A comparative study. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 51(4), 319-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural, contextual, and gender differences in peer talk: A comparative study
2010 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 319-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study focused on cultural, contextual, and gender differences in children's peer talk. Same-sex dyads of Estonian (n = 38), Finnish (n = 38), and Swedish (n = 34) preschool age children were videotaped during unstructured and structured play settings. We found only one gender difference in children's talkativeness and in the use of regulatory speech: during free play, Swedish boys used more imperatives per directives than Swedish girls. At the same time there were significant cultural and contextual differences. Estonian children were most directive and Swedish children were least directive. Finnish children were less directive than Estonian children but more directive than Swedish children. It was concluded that cultural and contextual factors strongly influence the likelihood, extent, and nature of gender differences in peer talk.

National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10979 (URN)10.1111/j.1467-9450.2010.00809.x (DOI)000279841300006 ()20338014 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-77955165476 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tulviste, T. & De Geer, B. (2009). Autonomy orientation in Estonian and Swedish family interactions. Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, 19(2), 279-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomy orientation in Estonian and Swedish family interactions
2009 (English)In: Pragmatics: Quarterly Publication of the International Pragmatics Association, ISSN 1018-2101, E-ISSN 2406-4238, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 279-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper compares the tendency to express autonomy in 20 Estonian, 20 Swedish, and 20 Swedish Estonian middle-class families with preadolescent children during videotaped family mealtimes. The results indicate that compared to the Swedish participants, participants from both Estonian samples expressed autonomy less frequently. Being talkative does not always mean expressing more autonomy. The Swedish preadolescents who were the most talkative and whose mothers were talking less, were more likely to express their personal needs, opinions and preferences. Possible reasons of cultural variability in autonomy orientation are discussed.

National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10983 (URN)000278539500007 ()2-s2.0-68549111352 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tryggvason, M., Tulviste, T. & De Geer, B. (2008). How do preschool children engage each other in dialogue in Finland, Estonia and Sweden?. Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, 27(4), 389-408
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do preschool children engage each other in dialogue in Finland, Estonia and Sweden?
2008 (English)In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 389-408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study compares preschool children in Finland, Estonia and Sweden regarding linguistic structures with which children in dyads elicited talk from each other in a naturalistic play activity Nineteen Finnish (mean age 5.1), 19 Estonian (mean age 5.4) and 17 Swedish (mean age 5.1) same-sex pairs were video-recorded by a native researcher Analyses of the results showed that children in different groups produced quite a similar number of utterances and eliciting talk structures. The Swedish and Finnish children used most yes-no questions, whereas the Estonian children had the highest occurrence of open questions. Imperative as well as elliptic structures were used by the Finnish children to a significantly higher extent than by the Swedish children. In summary, the groups differed less from each than was predicted on the basis of adult-child interaction. The results suggested that the symmetrical child-child free play context affected the choice of eliciting talk structures.

National Category
Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-10980 (URN)10.1515/MULTI.2008.018 (DOI)000262481700004 ()
Available from: 2011-08-25 Created: 2011-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Projects
Autonomy socialization: A comparative study in Estonia, Germany and Sweden [A005-2007_OSS]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6360-953x

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