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Gentile, M. (2016). Neighbourhood reputation in the Soviet city and beyond: Disassembling the geography of prestige in Ust’-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan. European Urban and Regional Studies, 23(4), 697-715
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neighbourhood reputation in the Soviet city and beyond: Disassembling the geography of prestige in Ust’-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan
2016 (English)In: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 697-715Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper revisits the geographical legacy of socialism in the urban areas of the former Soviet Union. Building on research on housing and socio-spatial differentiation under and after socialism, this will be achieved by examining an important component in the spatial differentiation of the city, namely neighbourhood reputation. The analysis is based on survey data (n = 1515) from the city of Ust’-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan; a combination of descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression are deployed in order to shed light on the factors that are associated with the reputation of the neighbourhoods in which people reside. The results show that the Soviet system manufactured its own brand of socio-spatial distinction, which reflected the priority hierarchies built in the socialist planned economy. Education, age and, most importantly, area of employment appear to have been ‘rewarded’ with prestigiously located housing.

Keywords
Kazakhstan, neighbourhood reputation, post-socialist city, socio-spatial differentiation
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31076 (URN)10.1177/0969776414537845 (DOI)000385668100010 ()2-s2.0-84989849011 (Scopus ID)
Projects
The Post-socialist city in the XXI century
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-11-03 Created: 2016-11-03 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. (2015). The "soviet" factor: Exploring perceived housing inequalities in a midsized city in the Donbas, Ukraine. Urban geography, 36(5), 696-720
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The "soviet" factor: Exploring perceived housing inequalities in a midsized city in the Donbas, Ukraine
2015 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 696-720Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, I revisit the role of Soviet legacy factors in explaining todays housing inequalities in a midsized post-Soviet city by investigating social, demographic, economic and geographic determinants of perceived housing quality. Building on a sample survey dataset (n = 3,000) that brings together both Soviet legacy effects and more universal influences on housing inequality, it is shown that various aspects of Soviet housing policy can be traced as well-preserved legacies today. The survey was conducted in 2009 in Stakhanov, Ukraine, and the method of analysis is binomial logistic regression. By capturing both the social costs attributed to the post-Soviet transition crisis as well as the underlying legacy factors inherited from the Soviet epoch, the findings suggest that any analysis of housing inequalities or residential segregation in the post-socialist city must come to terms with the impacts of socialist-era economic priorities on the urban social landscape.

Keywords
Donbas, housing inequalities, landscapes of priority, post-socialist city, shortage economy, socialist city, Ukraine
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-27824 (URN)10.1080/02723638.2015.1012363 (DOI)000355812800004 ()2-s2.0-84930926593 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-06-22 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. (2015). West oriented in the East-oriented Donbas: a political stratigraphy of geopolitical identity in Luhansk, Ukraine. Post-Soviet Affairs, 31(3), 201-223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>West oriented in the East-oriented Donbas: a political stratigraphy of geopolitical identity in Luhansk, Ukraine
2015 (English)In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 201-223Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Building on data from a survey (n = 4000) conducted in the eastern Ukrainian city of Luhansk in late 2013, this article explores the link between national identity and foreign policy preferences in the Donbas, suggesting that they are increasingly conflated in distinct geopolitical identities. Descriptive statistics and multinomial logistic regression are used to compare the characteristics of pro-West and uncertain individuals with those of the pro-Russian/Soviet individuals, with preferences on North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and European Union (EU) accession underlying this distinction. The results show that geopolitical identities in Luhansk have a complex political stratigraphy that includes demographic, socioeconomic, cultural, and attitudinal components. The pro-West constituency is younger, not Russian but often including members of other ethnic groups, well educated, more tolerant toward sexual minorities, generally more satisfied with life, and it also speaks better English. Conversely, those with pro-Russia/Soviet geopolitical identities are older, Russian, low educated, less fluent in English, intolerant, and unsatisfied with their lives. Uncertainty is more randomly distributed among social groups, indicating different underlying causes related to the source of the respondents’ uncertainty.

Keywords
Donbas, European Union, geopolitics, identity, NATO, Ukraine
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26335 (URN)10.1080/1060586X.2014.995410 (DOI)000351063300002 ()2-s2.0-84925247352 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. & Marcińczak, S. (2014). Housing inequalities in Bucharest: shallow changes in hesitant transition. GeoJournal, 79(4), 449-465
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing inequalities in Bucharest: shallow changes in hesitant transition
2014 (English)In: GeoJournal, ISSN 0343-2521, E-ISSN 1572-9893, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 449-465Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Much has been said, yet little remains known, about the impacts of the changes associated with post-socialist transition on housing inequalities in metropolitan Central and Eastern Europe. To some extent, this depends on the scarcity of 'hard evidence' about the socialist epoch against which the subsequent developments may be gauged. Based on a case study of Bucharest, the Romanian capital and one of the region's major cities, this study investigates various lines of housing inequality using data from a 20 % sample of the national censuses of 1992 and 2002. With only minor changes having taken place since the revolutionary events of late 1989, the year 1992 provides an accurate picture of the housing inequalities inherited from the socialist epoch, whereas the new societal order had largely been established by 2002. We use linear regression and binary logistic regression modeling to identify the factors that predict living space and level of facilities. The results suggest that the first decade of transition did not exert any major influences on the housing inequalities inherited from socialism, with the exception of notable improvements at the very top of the social pyramid. This finding is at odds with the literature that highlights the (suggested) effects of socio-economic polarization on the residential structure of cities after socialism. However, the results from 1992 indicate that housing was segmented along socio-economic lines already under socialism, and perhaps more so than one would have expected in the light of the literature on housing inequalities during this period.

Keywords
Bucharest, Housing inequalities, Post-socialism, Quantitative methods, Romania, Socialism
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-22458 (URN)10.1007/s10708-014-9530-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-84905030593 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-02-25 Created: 2014-02-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. & Sjöberg, Ö. (2013). Housing allocation under socialism: the Soviet case revisited. Post-Soviet Affairs, 29(2), 173-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Housing allocation under socialism: the Soviet case revisited
2013 (English)In: Post-Soviet Affairs, ISSN 1060-586X, E-ISSN 1938-2855, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 173-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social or public housing is an important component of the housing supply= n most European countries. Nowhere, however, has the notion of social hou= ng been taken as far as in the countries that formerly were ruled by soci= ist regimes, most notably the Soviet Union. For this reason, it may be ar= ed that the development of theorizations on housing has much to learn fro= this large but inconclusively studied example. One of the avowed virtues = socialism was that the system, in theory, guaranteed its subjects equal = ghts to housing. That this was not quite the case is well known in the li= rature, but in fact no robust evidence to support this view (or the contr= y) has been presented so far. Therefore, this paper's aim is to investiga= the functioning of the Soviet system of housing allocation, assessing it= claims to social equity and justice. Based on a detailed case study of ab= t 3500 Soviet-era housing allocation decisions made in Daugavpils, Latvia= at five poin! s in time covering various stages in the development of Soviet power (ful= coverage of decisions made in 1953, 1960, 1970, 1980, and January-April 1= 0), we illustrate how much living space was allocated to whom. In additio= we detail the characteristics of the waiting times involved. We apply bo= descriptive and regression methods on our data-set, making a significant= ontribution to what is known about the outcome of housing allocation unde= socialism and, at a more general level, under strictly supply-constrained= onditions.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-19421 (URN)000319740400004 ()2-s2.0-84878559707 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-07-11 Created: 2013-07-11 Last updated: 2017-06-26Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. (2013). Meeting the 'organs': The tacit dilemma of field research in authoritarian states. Area (London 1969), 45(4), 426-432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting the 'organs': The tacit dilemma of field research in authoritarian states
2013 (English)In: Area (London 1969), ISSN 0004-0894, E-ISSN 1475-4762, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 426-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To the regret of many scholars, science and politics often overlap, and nowhere as clearly as inside countries ruled by authoritarian governments, where research tends to attract the surveillance of repressive authorities and, more specifically, of the secret services (known as the 'organ' within post-communist space). While such surveillance places significant ethical and methodological challenges on field research, it is rarely discussed in the literature. This paper discusses what may happen when the organ takes interest in fieldwork. Based on the author's experiences in a range of post-communist countries, the aim is to present and discuss the related risks, and to show how these may materialise in relation to the organ's (c)overt activities.

Keywords
Authoritarian states, Fieldwork, Method, Post-communism, Risk, Secret services, authoritarianism, risk assessment
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-20535 (URN)10.1111/area.12030 (DOI)000330040000006 ()2-s2.0-84887133783 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-12-16 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Marcinczak, S., Gentile, M. & Stepniak, M. (2013). Paradoxes of (Post)Socialist Segregation: Metropolitan Sociospatial Divisions Under Socialism and After In Poland. Urban geography, 34(3), 327-352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradoxes of (Post)Socialist Segregation: Metropolitan Sociospatial Divisions Under Socialism and After In Poland
2013 (English)In: Urban geography, ISSN 0272-3638, E-ISSN 1938-2847, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 327-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The state of the art in research on residential segregation and concentr= ion in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) largely focuses on process descri= ion (e.g., the multitude of works on gentrification and suburbanization).= ven though major advances in the conceptualization and measurement of seg= gation have been made, works that scrutinize the patterns of segregation = d/or concentration in CEE are rare, while studies that simultaneously exp= re and link segregation patterns under socialism and after are virtually = nexistent. Relying on Polish census-tract level data on the educational s= ucture of population in 1978, 1988, and 2002, this study explores the pat= rns of social segregation and concentration in the three major Polish cit= s (Warsaw, Cracow, and od), representing different paths of development u= er socialism and after. The results show that the population of the three= ajor Polish cities was still socially heterogeneous at the census tract l= el in 2002. ! he results also reveal that the level of social residential segregation i= the three cities has been decreasing steadily since 1978, irrespective of= he prevailing economic system.

Keywords
Residential segregation, conce= ration, socialist city, post-socialist city, Poland.
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-19420 (URN)10.1080/02723638.2013.778667 (DOI)000320191900003 ()2-s2.0-84879230709 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-07-11 Created: 2013-07-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Petrova, S., Gentile, M., Mäkinen, I. H. & Bouzarovski, S. (2013). Perceptions of thermal comfort and housing quality: exploring the microgeographies of energy poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine. Environment and planning A, 45(5), 1240-1257
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of thermal comfort and housing quality: exploring the microgeographies of energy poverty in Stakhanov, Ukraine
2013 (English)In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1240-1257Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The growing recognition of the importance of indoor environments as 'active political-ecological spaces' has rarely been followed up by a systematic empirical engagement with the constituent dynamics and conceptual issues associated with infrastructural deprivation in this domain, particularly in non-Western contexts. Therefore, we investigate the relationship between self-reported perceptions of thermal comfort in the home, on the one hand, and a range of sociodemographic, housing, and health-related variables, on the other, via a quantitative analysis of a large-scale survey undertaken in the Eastern Ukrainian town of Stakhanov. Using the perceived level of thermal comfort as a starting point for its empirical explorations, we estimate the number and type of households who feel that they are receiving inadequate energy services in the home. Special attention is paid to the role of buildings in shaping the perceptions of thermal comfort.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-19536 (URN)10.1068/a45132 (DOI)000320635800016 ()2-s2.0-84878320682 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-20 Created: 2013-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M., Tammaru, T. & van Kempen, R. (2012). Heteropolitanization: Social and spatial change in Central and East European Cities. Cities, 29(5), 291-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heteropolitanization: Social and spatial change in Central and East European Cities
2012 (English)In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 291-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-17720 (URN)10.1016/j.cities.2012.05.005 (DOI)000308055700001 ()2-s2.0-84864117495 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gentile, M. (2012). Mass Privatisation, Unemployment and Mortality. Europe-Asia Studies, 64(4), 785-787
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mass Privatisation, Unemployment and Mortality
2012 (English)In: Europe-Asia Studies, ISSN 0966-8136, E-ISSN 1465-3427, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 785-787Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-17757 (URN)10.1080/09668136.2012.673249 (DOI)000304168500008 ()2-s2.0-84862065839 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5224-788x

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