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Tholander, Jakob
Publications (9 of 9) Show all publications
Höök, K., Caramiaux, B., Erkut, C., Forlizzi, J., Hajinejad, N., Haller, M., . . . Tobiasson, H. (2018). Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design. Informatics, 5(1), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design
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2018 (English)In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2018
Keywords
movement-based interaction, somaesthetic design, aesthetics, somatics, first-person perspective
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37793 (URN)10.3390/informatics5010008 (DOI)000428556600007 ()
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2020-03-31Bibliographically approved
Landwehr Sydow, S., Tholander, J. & Jonsson, M. (2017). "It's a Bomb!" - Material Literacy and Narratives of Making. In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI'17 Denver, Colorado, USA, May 6-11, 2017. (pp. 121-132). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It's a Bomb!" - Material Literacy and Narratives of Making
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 121-132Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
Keywords
Maker culture, material literacy, making, literacy, interaction, experience
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32807 (URN)10.1145/3025453.3025529 (DOI)000426970500011 ()2-s2.0-85044861068 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4655-9 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI'17 Denver, Colorado, USA, May 6-11, 2017.
Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2020-01-15Bibliographically approved
Normark, M. & Tholander, J. (2014). Performativity in Sustainable Interaction: The Case of Seasonal Grocery Shopping in EcoFriends. In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI, Toronto, April 26- May 1, 2014. (pp. 271-280). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Performativity in Sustainable Interaction: The Case of Seasonal Grocery Shopping in EcoFriends
2014 (English)In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 271-280Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The EcoFriends application was developed as an attempt tosupport grocery shopping adjusted to vegetables’seasonality through a performative approach to interactionand interactive applications. The design aimed at criticalreflection and inspiration among users, rather thanachieving a certain kind of persuasion. This guided thepractical design to be modelled around open-endednessand social voices to challenge ideas and points of view. Weargue that research addressing design for interactions aboutvalue-laden concepts such as sustainable action need tofind ways of supporting various knowledge discourses, bydistinguishing between performative and representationaltechnologies. The approach allowed us to identify anumber of design challenges regarding interactivetechnology and interaction design in relation to aspects ofknowledge and truth, trust, negotiation and responsibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2014
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-23514 (URN)10.1145/2556288.2557318 (DOI)2-s2.0-84900434385 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-2473-1 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI, Toronto, April 26- May 1, 2014.
Funder
Vinnova
Note

Artikeln är även kompletterad med en obligatorisk video på 30 sek, den finns här

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMP4LD5G4iM

Available from: 2014-05-26 Created: 2014-05-26 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Tholander, J., Normark, M. & Rossitto, C. (2012). Understanding Agency in Interaction Design Materials. In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at The ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (pp. 2499-2508). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding Agency in Interaction Design Materials
2012 (English)In: CHI '12 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 2499-2508Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-18489 (URN)10.1145/2207676.2208417 (DOI)2-s2.0-84862104579 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-1015-4 (ISBN)
Conference
The ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Available from: 2013-02-15 Created: 2013-02-12 Last updated: 2014-02-05Bibliographically approved
Johansson, C., Ahmet, Z., Tholander, J., Aleo, F., Jonsson, M. & Sumon, S. (2011). Weather Gods and Fruit Kids - Embodying abstract concepts using tactile feedback and whole body interaction. In: Hans Spada, Gerry Stahl, Naomi Miyake, Nancy Law (Ed.), Connecting computer-supported collaborative learning to policy and practice: CSCL 2011 Conference Proceedings - Long Papers, 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference. Paper presented at 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL 2011, Hong Kong, July 4-8, 2011. (pp. 160-167). International Society of the Learning Sciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weather Gods and Fruit Kids - Embodying abstract concepts using tactile feedback and whole body interaction
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2011 (English)In: Connecting computer-supported collaborative learning to policy and practice: CSCL 2011 Conference Proceedings - Long Papers, 9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference / [ed] Hans Spada, Gerry Stahl, Naomi Miyake, Nancy Law, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2011, p. 160-167Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present findings based on the design and study of a game like activity that allows for physical and bodily interaction around abstract concepts like energy and energy consumption in a collaborative learning setting. The game, called Weather Gods and Fruit Kids, uses motion sensing technologies in combination with tactile and audio feedback to create an embodied interactive setting without computer screens. We analyze and discuss the properties of the interactive setting as well as the interactions with and around the system using characteristics such as multiple modalities of response, large space interaction and aspects of focus and attention. The work suggests that alternative pedagogical activities can be created providing new entries to theoretical concepts using an embodied interaction approach. In particular it may support kinesthetic learners in their preference to learn by being physically engaged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2011
Keywords
Abstract concept, Collaborative learning, Computer screens, Embodied interaction, Large spaces, Motion sensing, Multiple modalities, Tactile feedback, Whole body, Energy policy, Energy utilization, Fruits, Abstracting
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-20721 (URN)2-s2.0-84858407364 (Scopus ID)9780578091525 (ISBN)
Conference
9th International Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conference, CSCL 2011, Hong Kong, July 4-8, 2011.
Available from: 2013-12-18 Created: 2013-12-17 Last updated: 2018-07-11Bibliographically approved
Fernaeus, Y., Tholander, J. & Jonsson, M. (2008). Beyond representations: towards an action centric perspective on tangible interaction. International Journal of Arts and Technology, 1(3/4), 249-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond representations: towards an action centric perspective on tangible interaction
2008 (English)In: International Journal of Arts and Technology, ISSN 1754-8853, E-ISSN 1754-8861, Vol. 1, no 3/4, p. 249-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-9144 (URN)10.1504/IJART.2008.022362 (DOI)2-s2.0-72849123149 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-06-15 Created: 2011-06-15 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Tholander, J. & Fernaeus, Y. (2008). Setting the stage - Embodied and spatial dimensions in emerging programming practices. Interacting with computers, 21(1/2), 117-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Setting the stage - Embodied and spatial dimensions in emerging programming practices
2008 (English)In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 21, no 1/2, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

n the design of interactive systems, developers sometimes need to engage in various ways of physical performance in order to communicate ideas and to test out properties of the system to be realised. External resources such as sketches, as well as bodily action, often play important parts in such processes, and several methods and tools that explicitly address such aspects of interaction design have recently been developed. This combined with the growing range of pervasive, ubiquitous, and tangible technologies add up to a complex web of physicality within the practice of designing interactive systems. We illustrate this dimension of systems development through three cases which in different ways address the design of systems where embodied performance is important. The first case shows how building a physical sport simulator emphasises a shift in activity between programming and debugging. The second case shows a build-once run-once scenario, where the fine-tuning and control of the run-time activity gets turned into an act of in situ performance by the programmers. The third example illustrates the explorative and experiential nature of programming and debugging systems for specialised and autonomous interaction devices. This multitude in approaches in existing programming settings reveals an expanded perspective of what practices of interaction design consist of, emphasising the interlinking between design, programming, and performance with the system that is being developed.

Keywords
Embodied interaction; Embodied performance; Interaction design; Physical user interfaces; Programming practice
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-9146 (URN)10.1016/j.intcom.2008.10.004 (DOI)000264354600013 ()2-s2.0-59649114289 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-06-15 Created: 2011-06-15 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tholander, J. & Fernaeus, Y. (2008). Three challenges when designing for children’s everyday digital literacy. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 3(2), 130-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three challenges when designing for children’s everyday digital literacy
2008 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, ISSN 1891-943X, E-ISSN 1891-943X, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 130-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We use the concept of digital literacy to refer to people’s competence of expressing themselves in computational form, and in this paper we specifically discuss the design of interactive technology aimed at letting children become digitally literate. A rarely discussed aspect of digital literacy in this respect concerns how it is supposed to take form in the context of improvised styles of use and interaction, resembling the kinds of activity commonly observed in kindergartens, school yards and centres for after-school activities. In such settings children often organize their own play activities, peers may go in and out of activities as they want, often without any necessary intervention by adult supervision. We align this kind of activity with the notion of ‘casual leisure’, and outline four basic challenges concerned with: a) a perspective on interaction, b) activity and context, c) the view of the user, and d) the character and role of the technology. We discuss these in relation to research attempting to design, evaluate, and make useful sense of children’s digital literacy in such activity. Our analysis identifies the sources of these challenges as due to expressions of tension between play and learning, between designers and users and a general striving for ‘hard fun’. The challenges and their consequences may be summarised as 1) the use of setting as allowing for spontaneous interactions, 2) the striving towards a participants’ perspective, 3) the incorporation of offline and social aspects into the design, and 4) the balancing of challenge with the easy and the accessible.

Keywords
Design perspectives, Digital literacy, Leisure, Play, Learning
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-13847 (URN)
Available from: 2009-12-30 Created: 2011-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Fernaeus, Y., Tholander, J. & Jonsson, M. (2008). Towards a new set of ideals: consequences of the practice turn in tangible interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on Tangible and embedded interaction: . Paper presented at TEI 2008, Bonn; Germany, February 18-20, 2008. (pp. 223-230). New York: ACM
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a new set of ideals: consequences of the practice turn in tangible interaction
2008 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on Tangible and embedded interaction, New York: ACM , 2008, p. 223-230Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM, 2008
Keywords
practice turn, tangible interaction, theoretical foundations
National Category
Media and Communication Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-12585 (URN)10.1145/1347390.1347441 (DOI)2-s2.0-42549159832 (Scopus ID)978-1-60558-004-3 (ISBN)
Conference
TEI 2008, Bonn; Germany, February 18-20, 2008.
Available from: 2011-10-26 Created: 2011-10-26 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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