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Dew, K. N., Landwehr Sydow, S., Rosner, D. K., Thayer, A. & Jonsson, M. (2019). Producing Printability: Articulation Work and Alignment in 3D Printing. Human-Computer Interaction, 34(5-6), 433-469
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Producing Printability: Articulation Work and Alignment in 3D Printing
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2019 (English)In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 34, no 5-6, p. 433-469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Three-dimensional printing is widely celebrated as enabling open design and manufacturing practice. With easy-to-use techniques such as automated modeling, fabrication machines ostensibly help designers turn ideas into fully fledged objects. Prior HCI literature focuses on improving printing through optimization and by developing printer and material capabilities. This paper expands such considerations by asking, how do 3D printing practitioners understand and create “printability?” And how might HCI better support the work that holds together printing workflows and changing ecosystems of materials and techniques? We conducted studies in two sites of open design: a technology firm in Silicon Valley, California and a makerspace in Stockholm, Sweden. Deploying workshops and interviews, we examine how practitioners negotiate the print experience, revealing a contingent process held together by trial and error exploration and careful interventions. These insights point to the value of tools and processes to support articulation work, what Strauss and colleagues have called the acts of fitting together people, tasks, and their ordering to accomplish an overarching project. We show that despite the sought-after efficiencies of such manufacturing, 3D printing entails articulation work, particularly acts of alignment, exposing messy modes of production carried out by a varied cast of practitioners, machines, and materials.

Keywords
Human computer interaction, User interfaces, 3-D printing, Articulation works, Automated modeling, Manufacturing practices, Printing workflows, Silicon valley, Stockholm, Sweden, Trial and error, 3D printers
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37765 (URN)10.1080/07370024.2019.1566001 (DOI)000480290400003 ()2-s2.0-85061232609 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Caramiaux, B., Erkut, C., Forlizzi, J., Hajinejad, N., Haller, M., . . . Tobiasson, H. (2018). Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design. Informatics, 5(1), Article ID 8.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embracing First-Person Perspectives in Soma-Based Design
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2018 (English)In: Informatics, ISSN 2227-9709, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A set of prominent designers embarked on a research journey to explore aesthetics in movement-based design. Here we unpack one of the design sensitivities unique to our practice: a strong first person perspective-where the movements, somatics and aesthetic sensibilities of the designer, design researcher and user are at the forefront. We present an annotated portfolio of design exemplars and a brief introduction to some of the design methods and theory we use, together substantiating and explaining the first-person perspective. At the same time, we show how this felt dimension, despite its subjective nature, is what provides rigor and structure to our design research. Our aim is to assist researchers in soma-based design and designers wanting to consider the multiple facets when designing for the aesthetics of movement. The applications span a large field of designs, including slow introspective, contemplative interactions, arts, dance, health applications, games, work applications and many others.

Keywords
movement-based interaction, somaesthetic design, aesthetics, somatics, first-person perspective
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37793 (URN)10.3390/informatics5010008 (DOI)000428556600007 ()
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Asplund, S. & Jonsson, M. (2018). SWAY - designing for balance and posture awareness. In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction: . Paper presented at 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Stockholm; March 18-21, 2018. (pp. 470-475). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SWAY - designing for balance and posture awareness
2018 (English)In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 470-475Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the SWAY prototype that encourages people to explore aspects around balance and posture in a playful way. The prototype senses small movements and shifts in posture using a Kinect sensor, and translates these movements to the tilting of a platform holding a set of marbles, and to haptic feedback in the form of vibrations. The prototype provides an interactive experience focusing on building body awareness with a particular focus on balance and posture. The design inquiry provided new insights with respect to reinforcement of bodily experiences and how different modalities affect the guiding of attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018
Keywords
Balance, Bodily interaction, Body awareness, Posture, Somaesthetics, Bodily interactions, Haptic feedbacks, Interactive experiences, Kinect sensors, Balancing
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35352 (URN)10.1145/3173225.3173262 (DOI)2-s2.0-85046637435 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-5568-1 (ISBN)
Conference
12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Stockholm; March 18-21, 2018.
Available from: 2018-05-25 Created: 2018-05-25 Last updated: 2018-05-25Bibliographically approved
Landwehr Sydow, S., Tholander, J. & Jonsson, M. (2017). "It's a Bomb!" - Material Literacy and Narratives of Making. In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at CHI'17 Denver, Colorado, USA, May 6-11, 2017. (pp. 121-132). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It's a Bomb!" - Material Literacy and Narratives of Making
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 121-132Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper analyses a series of events in which a discarded box found in a garbage room is examined and taken apart in the context of a makerspace. The participants' inquiry provided a rich and multifaceted experience in various settings, including puzzle-solving, exploring physical and digital materials, engaging people with different skills. The social engagements with and around the artifacts brought certain interpretative aspects to the fore. Situated acts of interpretation worked as ways of building a coherent narrative and a meaningful experience. In the paper, we highlight the relationship between on the one hand the subjects' skills and motivations to understand and make sense of the technology at hand which we call material literacy, and on the other hand the specific material qualities that encourage or trigger certain interpretations and experiences. The qualities we discuss are: opacity, risk, authenticity, uniqueness, age, and hybridity. This study allows us to reposition the contemporary understanding of makerspaces beyond that of being places for innovation and learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
Keywords
Maker culture, material literacy, making, literacy, interaction, experience
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32807 (URN)10.1145/3025453.3025529 (DOI)2-s2.0-85044861068 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4655-9 (ISBN)
Conference
CHI'17 Denver, Colorado, USA, May 6-11, 2017.
Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2018-04-23Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Hummels, C., Isbister, K., Marti, P., Segura, E. M., Jonsson, M., . . . Lim, Y.-K. -. (2017). Soma-based design theory. In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems: . Paper presented at Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems,Denver; United States, May 6-11, 2017. (pp. 550-557). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soma-based design theory
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2017 (English)In: CHI EA '17 Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 550-557Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Movement-based interaction design is increasingly popular, with application domains ranging from dance, sport, gaming to physical rehabilitation. In a workshop at CHI 2016, a set of prominent artists, game designers, and interaction designers embarked on a research journey to explore what we came to refer to as "aesthetics in soma-based design". In this follow-up workshop, we would like to take the next step, shifting from discussing the philosophical underpinnings we draw upon to explain and substantiate our practice, to form our own interaction design theory and conceptualisations. We propose that soma-based design theory needs practical, pragmatic as well as analytical study - otherwise the felt dimension will be missing. We will consider how such tacit knowledge can be articulated, documented and shared. To ground the discussion firmly in the felt experience of our own practice, the workshop is organised as a joint practical design work session, supported by analytical study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017
Keywords
Design theory, Soma-based interaction, Somaesthetics
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32748 (URN)10.1145/3027063.3027082 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019570374 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4656-6 (ISBN)
Conference
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems,Denver; United States, May 6-11, 2017.
Available from: 2017-06-09 Created: 2017-06-09 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Bergström, I. & Jonsson, M. (2016). Sarka: Sonification and somaesthetic appreciation design. In: MOCO '16: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Movement and Computing. Paper presented at 3rd International Symposium on Movement and Computing, Thessaloniki, July 5-6, 2016.. New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sarka: Sonification and somaesthetic appreciation design
2016 (English)In: MOCO '16: Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Movement and Computing, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, article id 1Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We often take for granted that we have immediate access to our perception and experience of and through our bodies. But inward listening is a demanding activity and thus not easy to learn to perform or design for. With the Sarka mat we want to support the ability to direct attention by providing sound feedback linked to the weight distribution and motion intensity of different parts of the body, and to provide an exemplar for how such design may be conducted. The process of Sarka's creation is informed by Somaesthetic Appreciation Design. We discuss how a sonic feedback signal can influence listeners, followed by how we, in this design, worked to navigate the complex design space presented to us. We detail the design process involved, and the very particular set of limitations which this interactive sonification presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
Series
ACM International Conference Proceeding Series
Keywords
Biofeedback, Carpet, Feldenkrais, Somaesthetics, Somatic appreciation design, Somatic practices, Sonification
National Category
Media Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30813 (URN)10.1145/2948910.2948922 (DOI)2-s2.0-84979774919 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-4307-7 (ISBN)
Conference
3rd International Symposium on Movement and Computing, Thessaloniki, July 5-6, 2016.
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-09-01 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, M., Ståhl, A., Mercurio, J., Karlsson, A., Naveen, R. & Höök, K. (2016). The aesthetics of heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli. In: TEI '16 Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction. Paper presented at The ACM International conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI), Eindhoven, February 14-17, 2016 (pp. 109-117). New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The aesthetics of heat: Guiding Awareness with Thermal Stimuli
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2016 (English)In: TEI '16 Proceedings of the TEI '16: Tenth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 109-117Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this paper we discuss the design process and results from a design exploration on the use of thermal stimuli in body awareness exercises. A user-study was performed on an interactive prototype in the form of an interactive heat mat. The paper brings forth an alternative understanding of heat as a design material that extends the common understanding of thermal stimuli in HCI as a communication modality to instead bring the aesthetic and experiential properties to the fore. Findings account for felt body experiences of thermal stimuli and a number of design qualities related to heat as a design material are formulated, pointing to experiential qualities concerning the felt body, subjectivity and subtleness as well as material qualities concerning materiality, inertia and heat transfer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016
Keywords
thermal stimuli; heat; somaesthetics; body awareness
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28891 (URN)10.1145/2839462.2839487 (DOI)2-s2.0-84964815292 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-3582-9 (ISBN)
Conference
The ACM International conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI), Eindhoven, February 14-17, 2016
Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Landwehr Sydow, S. & Jonsson, M. (2016). The Forensics of Transient Computational Materials. In: Nordi'CHI 2016 Workshop. Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI: . Paper presented at Nordi'CHI 2016, Gothenburg, October 23-27, 2016..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Forensics of Transient Computational Materials
2016 (English)In: Nordi'CHI 2016 Workshop. Things Fall Apart: Unpacking the Temporalities of Impermanence for HCI, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Electronic components and computational artifacts tend to have a short lifespan. When they age, they become obsolete and lose their value and meaning. In a case where members of a makerspace investigate an old artifact with electronic components, we use the notion of forensics to describe how the lost meanings of discarded objects can be revived, and how the acts of inquiry around these objects and materials also bring new meaning to the objects at hand. This points to an alternative perspective on the transiency of electronic materials, where the focus is not on prolonging their lifespan, but rather on how such objects and materials can become meaningful after their “death”.

National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32808 (URN)
Conference
Nordi'CHI 2016, Gothenburg, October 23-27, 2016.
Available from: 2017-06-14 Created: 2017-06-14 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Höök, K., Ståhl, A., Jonsson, M., Mercurio, J., Karlsson, A. & Johnson, E.-C. B. (2015). Somaesthetic Design. interactions, 22(4), 26-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somaesthetic Design
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2015 (English)In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28373 (URN)10.1145/2770888 (DOI)2-s2.0-84934765426 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Landwehr Sydow, S. & Jonsson, M. (2015). The organization of personal fabrication: Hackathons and makerspaces as semi-professional places for creative making. In: On website for workshop "The Future of Making: Where Industrial and Personal Fabrication Meet": . Paper presented at Critical Alternatives, Aarhus, August 15-21, 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The organization of personal fabrication: Hackathons and makerspaces as semi-professional places for creative making
2015 (English)In: On website for workshop "The Future of Making: Where Industrial and Personal Fabrication Meet", 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Maker and DIY cultures, as well as the trend towards personal fabrication have gained recent visibility in HCI research. While first reflecting on makers as a new user and “social actor”, current rhetoric has shifted towards the maker movement’s potential for empowerment and democratization. By focusing on places and the organization of personal fabrication we are drawing lines between amateur vs. professional, and home vs. work settings as well as leisure vs. educational motivations. Here we discuss and map out the characteristics of semi-professional places for making in the light of a small study from a hackathon event.

Keywords
Maker movement, Personal fabrication, Hackathon, semi-professional, making, design
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28443 (URN)
Conference
Critical Alternatives, Aarhus, August 15-21, 2015.
Note

Accepted positioning paper in workshop "The Future of Making: Where Industrial and Personal Fabrication Meet"

Available from: 2015-10-06 Created: 2015-10-06 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-1644-1778

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