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Jukkala, Tanya
Publications (10 of 14) Show all publications
Andersdotter Fabre, E., Anneroth, E., Behtoui, A., Borgström, S., Ejigu, A., Escobar, V., . . . Wrangsten, C. (2019). Mötesplatser för unga läggs ner. Är det hållbart?. Samhällsbyggaren, 2, 26-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mötesplatser för unga läggs ner. Är det hållbart?
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2019 (Swedish)In: Samhällsbyggaren, ISSN 2002-956X, Vol. 2, p. 26-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Stockholmsregionen växer och utvecklas. Regionen förväntas växa med ytterligare cirka en miljon invånare fram till år 2050. Fler människor måste dela på stadens utrymmen och resurser. Stockholms ytterområden – där de flesta bor och kommer att bo – förtätas och rustas upp. Hur bygger vi då ett hållbart Stockholm, ett samhälle där alla kan få plats, delta, trivas och må bra?

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38210 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Behtoui, A., Carlson, P., Ferlander, S., Heber, A., Jukkala, T. & Lindström, J. (2019). Politiskt färgad undersökning med dålig representativitet: Replik DN Debatt 19/2. Dagens Nyheter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Politiskt färgad undersökning med dålig representativitet: Replik DN Debatt 19/2
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2019 (Swedish)In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37819 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-02173
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-06-12Bibliographically approved
Ferlander, S., Jukkala, T., Utas, A. & Papakostas, A. (2018). Regionens ansvar för förortens mellanmänskliga rum. PLAN (4-5), 87-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regionens ansvar för förortens mellanmänskliga rum
2018 (Swedish)In: PLAN, no 4-5, p. 87-88Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Political Science Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36647 (URN)
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2019-05-16Bibliographically approved
Jukkala, T., Stickley, A., Mäkinen, I. H., Baburin, A. & Sparén, P. (2017). Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-2005. BMC Public Health, 17(1), Article ID 235.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age, period and cohort effects on suicide mortality in Russia, 1956-2005
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2017 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Russian suicide mortality rates changed rapidly over the second half of the twentieth century. This study attempts to differentiate between underlying period and cohort effects in relation to the changes in suicide mortality in Russia between 1956 and 2005.

METHODS: Sex- and age-specific suicide mortality data were analyzed using an age-period-cohort (APC) approach. Descriptive analyses and APC modeling with log-linear Poisson regression were performed.

RESULTS: Strong period effects were observed for the years during and after Gorbachev's political reforms (including the anti-alcohol campaign) and for those following the break-up of the Soviet Union. After mutual adjustment, the cohort- and period-specific relative risk estimates for suicide revealed differing underlying processes. While the estimated period effects had an overall positive trend, cohort-specific developments indicated a positive trend for the male cohorts born between 1891 and 1931 and for the female cohorts born between 1891 and 1911, but a negative trend for subsequent cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that the specific life experiences of cohorts may be important for variations in suicide mortality across time, in addition to more immediate effects of changes in the social environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2017
Keywords
Age-period-cohort analysis, Russia, Suicide
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32219 (URN)10.1186/s12889-017-4158-2 (DOI)000396054600003 ()28270123 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014680421 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A052-10
Available from: 2017-03-09 Created: 2017-03-09 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved
Ferlander, S., Stickley, A., Kislitsyna, O., Jukkala, T., Carlson, P. & Mäkinen, I. H. (2016). Social capital - a mixed blessing for women? A cross-sectional study of different forms of social relations and self-rated depression in Moscow. BMC Psychology, 4(1), Article ID 37.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social capital - a mixed blessing for women? A cross-sectional study of different forms of social relations and self-rated depression in Moscow
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2016 (English)In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Depression is a major health problem worldwide, especially among women. The condition has been related to a number of factors, such as alcohol consumption, economic situation and, more recently, to social capital. However, there have been relatively few studies about the social capital-depression relationship in Eastern Europe. This paper aims to fill this gap by examining the association between different forms of social capital and self-rated depression in Moscow. Differences between men and women will also be examined, with a special focus on women.

METHODS: Data was obtained from the Moscow Health Survey, which was conducted in 2004 with 1190 Muscovites aged 18 years or above. For depression, a single-item self-reported measure was used. Social capital was operationalised through five questions about different forms of social relations. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to estimate the association between social capital and self-rated depression, separately for men and women.

RESULTS: More women (48 %) than men (36 %) reported that they had felt depressed during the last year. An association was found between social capital and reported depression only among women. Women who were divorced or widowed or who had little contact with relatives had higher odds of reporting depression than those with more family contact. Women who regularly engaged with people from different age groups outside of their families were also more likely to report depression than those with less regular contact.

CONCLUSIONS: Social capital can be a mixed blessing for women. Different forms of social relations can lead to different health outcomes, both positive and negative. Although the family is important for women's mental health in Moscow, extra-familial relations across age groups can be mentally distressing. This suggests that even though social capital can be a valuable resource for mental health, some of its forms can be mentally deleterious to maintain, especially for women. More research is needed on both sides to social capital. A special focus should be placed on bridging social relations among women in order to better understand the complex association between social capital and depression in Russia and elsewhere.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30673 (URN)10.1186/s40359-016-0144-1 (DOI)27449106 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85008505378 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Note

ERRATUM: Ferlander, S., Stickley, A., Kislitsyna, O., Jukkala, T., Carlson, P., Mäkinen, I.H. (2017) Erratum: Social capital-a mixed blessing for women? A cross-sectional study of different forms of social relations and self-rated depression in Moscow. [BMC Psychology, 4, (2016) (37) DOI: 10.1186/s40359-016-0144-1 ] BMC Psychology, 5 (1), art. no. 20. DOI: 10.1186/s40359-017-0190-3

Available from: 2016-07-28 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Jukkala, T., Mäkinen, I. H. & Stickley, A. (2015). The historical development of suicide mortality in Russia, 1870-2007. Archives of Suicide Research, 19(1), 117-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The historical development of suicide mortality in Russia, 1870-2007
2015 (English)In: Archives of Suicide Research, ISSN 1381-1118, E-ISSN 1573-8159, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 117-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Russia has one of the highest suicide mortality rates in the world. This study investigates the development of Russian suicide mortality over a longer time period in order to provide a context within which the contemporary high level might be better understood. Annual sex- and age-specific suicide-mortality data for Russia for the period 1870-2007 were studied, where available. Russian suicide mortality increased 11-fold over the period. Trends in male and female suicide developed similarly, although male suicide rates were consistently much higher. From the 1990s suicide has increased in a relative sense among the young (15-34), while the high suicide mortality among middle-aged males has reduced. Changes in Russian suicide mortality over the study period may be attributable to modernisation processes.

Keywords
Russia, suicide, modernisa tion, time series, history
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-18698 (URN)10.1080/13811118.2014.915774 (DOI)000349329400009 ()25058568 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84924977283 (Scopus ID)
Note

Som manuskript i avhandling. As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2013-02-24 Created: 2013-04-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Jukkala, T. (2013). Självmord som ett avlägsnande från kommunikation: ett nytt luhmannskt perspektiv på ett gammalt sociologiskt problem. Sosiologi i dag, 43(1), 58-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Självmord som ett avlägsnande från kommunikation: ett nytt luhmannskt perspektiv på ett gammalt sociologiskt problem
2013 (Swedish)In: Sosiologi i dag, ISSN 0332-6330, E-ISSN 1893-4617, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 58-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-18697 (URN)
Available from: 2013-02-24 Created: 2013-04-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Jukkala, T. (2013). Suicide in Russia: A macro-sociological study. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Suicide in Russia: A macro-sociological study
2013 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This work constitutes a macro-sociological study of suicide. The empirical focus is on suicide mortality in Russia, which is among the highest in the world and has, moreover, developed in a dramatic manner over the second half of the 20th century. Suicide mortality in contemporary Russia is here placed within the context of development over a longer time period through empirical studies on 1) the general and sex- and age-specific developments in suicide over the period 1870–2007, 2) underlying dynamics of Russian suicide mortality 1956–2005 pertaining to differences between age groups, time periods, and particular generations and 3) the continuity in the aggregate-level relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality from late Tsarist period to post-World War II Russia. In addition, a fourth study explores an alternative to Émile Durkheim’s dominating macro-sociological perspective on suicide by making use of Niklas Luhmann’s theory of social systems. With the help of Luhmann’s macro-sociological perspective it is possible to consider suicide and its causes also in terms of processes at the individual level (i.e. at the level of psychic systems) in a manner that contrasts with the ‘holistic’ perspective of Durkheim. The results of the empirical studies show that Russian suicide mortality, despite its exceptionally high level and dramatic changes in the contemporary period, shares many similarities with the patterns seen in Western countries when examined over a longer time period. Societal modernization in particular seems to have contributed to the increased rate of suicide in Russia in a manner similar to what happened earlier in Western Europe. In addition, the positive relationship between heavy alcohol consumption and suicide mortality proved to be remarkably stable across the past one and a half centuries. These results were interpreted using the Luhmannian perspective on suicide developed in this work. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2013. p. 66
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Social Sciences, ISSN 1652-9030 ; 87Södertörn Doctoral Dissertations, ISSN 1652-7399 ; 76
Keywords
Suicide, Russia, historical development, time-series analysis, age-period-cohort analysis, Émile Durkheim, Niklas Luhmann
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-18696 (URN)978-91-554-8602-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2013-04-12, IV, Universitetshuset, Biskopsgatan 3, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2013-04-02 Created: 2013-04-02 Last updated: 2015-03-02Bibliographically approved
Jukkala, T. & Mäkinen, I. H. (2011). Acceptance of suicide in Moscow. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 46(8), 753-765
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acceptance of suicide in Moscow
2011 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 753-765Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Attitudes concerning the acceptability of suicide have been emphasized as being important for understanding why levels of suicide mortality vary in different societies across the world. While Russian suicide mortality levels are among the highest in the world, not much is known about attitudes to suicide in Russia. This study aims to obtain a greater understanding about the levels and correlates of suicide acceptance in Russia. Data from a survey of 1,190 Muscovites were analysed using logistic regression techniques. Suicide acceptance was examined among respondents in relation to social, economic and demographic factors as well as in relation to attitudes towards other moral questions. The majority of interviewees (80%) expressed condemnatory attitudes towards suicide, although men were slightly less condemning. The young, the higher educated, and the non-religious were more accepting of suicide (OR > 2). However, the two first-mentioned effects disappeared when controlling for tolerance, while a positive effect of lower education on suicide acceptance appeared. When controlling for other independent variables, no significant effects were found on suicide attitudes by gender, one's current family situation, or by health-related or economic problems. The most important determinants of the respondents' attitudes towards suicide were their tolerance regarding other moral questions and their religiosity. More tolerant views, in general, also seemed to explain the more accepting views towards suicide among the young and the higher educated. Differences in suicide attitudes between the sexes seemed to be dependent on differences in other factors rather than on gender per se. Suicide attitudes also seemed to be more affected by one's earlier experiences in terms of upbringing and socialization than by events and processes later in life.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-13437 (URN)10.1007/s00127-010-0244-9 (DOI)000292700700010 ()2-s2.0-80051791575 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-21 Created: 2011-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Jukkala, T. & Norström, T. (2011). Alcohol and Suicide in Russia, 1870-1894 and 1956-2005: Evidence for the Continuation of a Harmful Drinking Culture Across Time?. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 72(2), 341-347
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol and Suicide in Russia, 1870-1894 and 1956-2005: Evidence for the Continuation of a Harmful Drinking Culture Across Time?
2011 (English)In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1937-1888, E-ISSN 1938-4114, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 341-347Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Previous research suggests that a strong relation exists between alcohol consumption and suicide in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia. This study extends this analysis across a much longer historical time frame by examining the relationship between heavy drinking and suicide in tsarist and post-World War 11 Russia. Method: Using alcohol poisoning mortality data as a proxy for heavy drinking, time-series analytical modeling techniques were used to examine the strength of the alcohol-suicide relation in the provinces of European Russia in the period 1870-1894 and for Russia in 1956-2005. Results: During 1870-1894, a decreasing trend was recorded in heavy drinking in Russia that contrasted with the sharp increase observed in this phenomenon in the post-World War 11 period. A rising trend in suicide was recorded in both study periods, although the increase was much greater in the latter period. The strength of the heavy drinking suicide relation nevertheless remained unchanged across time, with a 10% increase in heavy drinking resulting in a 3.5% increase in suicide in tsarist Russia and a 3.8% increase in post-World War II Russia. Conclusions: Despite the innumerable societal changes that have occurred in Russia across the two study periods and the growth in the level of heavy drinking, the strength of the heavy drinking-suicide relation has remained unchanged across time. This suggests the continuation of a highly detrimental drinking culture where the heavy episodic drinking of distilled spirits (vodka) is an essential element in the alcohol-suicide association. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 72, 341-347, 2011)

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-13438 (URN)10.15288/jsad.2011.72.341 (DOI)000288570800018 ()21388607 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79952935274 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-11-21 Created: 2011-11-21 Last updated: 2017-07-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
A city for everyone? A study about young women´s lives in a transforming suburb. [2018-02173_VR]; Södertörn University; Publications
Lindström, J. & Ferlander, S. (2020). Mitt i krisen brinner bilar – fortsätt förebygg!. Dagens samhälle (30 mars)Andersdotter Fabre, E., Anneroth, E., Behtoui, A., Borgström, S., Ejigu, A., Escobar, V., . . . Wrangsten, C. (2019). Mötesplatser för unga läggs ner. Är det hållbart?. Samhällsbyggaren, 2, 26-28Behtoui, A., Carlson, P., Ferlander, S., Heber, A., Jukkala, T. & Lindström, J. (2019). Politiskt färgad undersökning med dålig representativitet: Replik DN Debatt 19/2. Dagens Nyheter
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