sh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 113) Show all publications
Stickley, A., Koyanagi, A., Takahashi, H., Ruchkin, V., Inoue, Y., Yazawa, A. & Kamio, Y. (2018). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and happiness among adults in the general population. Psychiatry Research, 265, 317-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and happiness among adults in the general population
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 265, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Despite an increasing focus on the role of mood and emotions in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as yet, there has been comparatively little research on positive emotions. To address this research gap, the current study examined the association between ADHD symptoms and happiness using data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. The analytic sample comprised 7274 adults aged 18 and above residing in private households in England. Information was collected on ADHD symptoms using the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener, while happiness was assessed with a single (3-point) measure. Multivariable ordinal logistic regression analysis and a mediation analysis were performed to examine associations. Greater ADHD symptom severity was associated with higher odds for feeling less happy. Emotional instability (percentage mediated 37.1%), anxiety disorder (35.6%) and depression (29.9%) were all important mediators of the association between ADHD and happiness. Given that happiness has been linked to a number of beneficial outcomes, the results of this study highlight the importance of diagnosing ADHD in adults and also of screening for and treating any comorbid psychiatric disorders in these individuals.

Keywords
ADHD, Anxiety, Depression, Emotion, Happiness, Stressful life events
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35301 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2018.05.004 (DOI)000435428300048 ()29778053 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85047191646 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-16 Created: 2018-05-16 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Tachimori, H., Inoue, Y., Shinkai, T., Yoshimura, R., Nakamura, J., . . . Kamio, Y. (2018). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and suicidal behavior in adult psychiatric outpatients. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and suicidal behavior in adult psychiatric outpatients
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, ISSN 1323-1316, E-ISSN 1440-1819Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS: To examine the association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and suicidal behavior in psychiatric outpatients and whether this association differs among patients with different psychiatric disorders.

METHODS: Cross-sectional data came from the Japan Prevalence Study of Adult ADHD at Psychiatric Outpatient Care (the J-PAAP study) which included psychiatric outpatients aged 18-65 years recruited from one university hospital and three general psychiatric outpatient clinics in Kitakyushu City, Fukuoka, Japan in April 2014 to January 2015 (N=864). The Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) Screener was used to collect information on ADHD symptoms. Reports of current and lifetime suicidal behavior were also obtained. A multivariable Poisson regression analysis was used to examine the association between ADHD symptoms and suicidal behavior.

RESULTS: After adjusting for covariates there was a strong association between possible ADHD (ASRS ≥ 14) and suicidal behavior with prevalence ratios ranging from 1.17 (lifetime suicidal ideation) to 1.59 (lifetime suicide attempt) and 2.36 (current suicidal ideation). When ASRS strata were used, there was a dose-response association between increasing ADHD symptoms and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Analyses of individual ICD-10 psychiatric disorders showed that associations varied across disorders and that for anxiety disorder ADHD symptoms were significantly linked to all forms of suicidal behavior.

CONCLUSION: ADHD symptom severity is associated with an increased risk for suicidal behavior in general psychiatric outpatients. As ADHD symptoms are common among adult psychiatric outpatients, detecting and treating ADHD in this population may be important for preventing suicidal behavior. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Keywords
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Japan, outpatients, attempted suicide, suicidal ideation
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35385 (URN)10.1111/pcn.12685 (DOI)29845681 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-31 Created: 2018-05-31 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A. & Leinsalu, M. (2018). Childhood hunger and depressive symptoms in adulthood: findings from a population-based study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 226, 332-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood hunger and depressive symptoms in adulthood: findings from a population-based study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 226, p. 332-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several studies have linked childhood hunger to an increased risk for later depression. However, as yet, there has been little research on this relation in adults of all ages or whether there are sex differences in this association. The current study examined these issues using data from a national population-based sample.

Methods: Data were analyzed from 5095 adults aged 25–84 collected during the Estonian Health Interview Survey 2006. Information was obtained on the frequency of going to bed hungry in childhood and on depressive symptoms using the Emotional State Questionnaire (EST-Q). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between hunger and depression while controlling for other demographic, socioeconomic and health-related variables.

Results: In a fully adjusted model, going to bed hungry in childhood either sometimes or often was associated with significantly increased odds for adult depressive symptoms. When the analysis was stratified by sex the association was more evident in men where any frequency of childhood hunger was linked to adult depression while only women who had experienced hunger often had higher odds for depressive symptoms in the final model.

Limitations: Data on childhood hunger were retrospectively reported and may have been affected by recall bias. We also lacked information on potentially relevant variables such as other childhood adversities that might have been important for the observed associations.

Conclusion: Childhood hunger is associated with an increased risk for depressive symptoms among adults. Preventing hunger in childhood may be important for mental health across the life course.

Keywords
adult, childhood, depression, hunger, stress
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33403 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2017.09.013 (DOI)000414329000045 ()29031183 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85030995992 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Note

Also funded by Estonian Research Council (IUT5-1)

Available from: 2017-09-15 Created: 2017-09-15 Last updated: 2017-11-24Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Koyanagi, A., Inoue, Y. & Leinsalu, M. (2018). Childhood hunger and thoughts of death or suicide in older adults. The American journal of geriatric psychiatry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood hunger and thoughts of death or suicide in older adults
2018 (English)In: The American journal of geriatric psychiatry, ISSN 1064-7481, E-ISSN 1545-7214Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective There is little research on the effects of childhood hunger on adult mental health. This study examined the association between childhood hunger and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide in older adults. Design Data were analyzed from adults aged 60 and above collected during the Estonian Health Interview Survey 2006 (N=2455). Retrospective information was obtained on the frequency (never, seldom, sometimes, often) of going to bed hungry in childhood, and on the presence of recurrent thoughts of death or suicide in the past 4 weeks. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between the variables. Results Experiencing hunger in childhood was common (37.6%) with 14.3% of the respondents stating that they often went to bed hungry. In a univariate analysis going to bed hungry either sometimes or often more than doubled the odds for thoughts of death or suicide. Although adjustment for a range of covariates (including physical diseases and depressive episode) attenuated the associations, in the fully adjusted model going to bed hungry sometimes continued to be associated with significantly increased odds for thoughts of death or suicide in older adults (OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.10–2.74; Wald χ2 = 5.7, df = 1, p = 0.017). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that the effects of childhood hunger may be long lasting and associated with mental health and well-being even in older adults.

Keywords
childhood, hunger, death ideation, suicide ideation, Estonia
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35774 (URN)10.1016/j.jagp.2018.06.005 (DOI)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Koyanagi, A., Lara, E., Stubbs, B., Carvalho, A. F., Oh, H., Stickley, A., . . . Vancampfort, D. (2018). Chronic Physical Conditions, Multimorbidity, and Mild Cognitive Impairment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, 66(4), 721-727
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic Physical Conditions, Multimorbidity, and Mild Cognitive Impairment in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 721-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between chronic physical conditions and multimorbidity and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

DESIGN: Nationally representative, cross-sectional, community-based study.

SETTING: Six countries that participated in the World Health Organization Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health.

PARTICIPANTS: Individuals aged 50 and older (N=32,715; mean age 62.1 ± 15.6; 51.7% female).

MEASUREMENTS: The definition of MCI was based on the recommendations of the National Institute on Ageing and Alzheimer's Association. Ten chronic conditions were assessed (angina pectoris, arthritis, asthma, cataract, chronic lung disease, diabetes mellitus, edentulism, hearing problems, hypertension, stroke). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between chronic physical conditions, multimorbidity (≥2 chronic conditions), and MCI.

RESULTS: The prevalence of multimorbidity was 49.8% (95% confidence interval (CI)=48.1-51.5%) and of MCI was 15.3% (95% CI=14.4-16.3%). After adjustment for potential confounders, edentulism (odds ratio (OR)=1.24), arthritis (OR=1.24), chronic lung disease (OR=1.29), cataract (OR=1.33), stroke (OR=1.94), hearing problems (OR=2.27), and multimorbidity (OR=1.40) were significantly associated with MCI. There was a gradual increase in the likelihood of MCI (1 condition: OR=1.21, 95% CI=1.03-1.42; ≥4 conditions: OR=2.07, 95% CI=1.70-2.52).

CONCLUSION: These results highlight the need to investigate the underlying mechanisms linking chronic conditions and MCI and whether prevention or treatment of chronic conditions or multimorbidity can reduce the onset of cognitive decline and subsequent dementia, especially in LMICs.

Keywords
chronic physical conditions, low- and middle-income countries, mild cognitive impairment, multimorbidity
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34620 (URN)10.1111/jgs.15288 (DOI)000430300800014 ()29427504 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041722415 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-15 Created: 2018-02-15 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A. & Koyanagi, A. (2018). Physical multimorbidity and loneliness: A population-based study. PLoS ONE, 13(1), Article ID e0191651.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical multimorbidity and loneliness: A population-based study
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 1, article id e0191651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multimorbidity has been linked to a variety of negative outcomes although as yet, there has been little research on its association with loneliness. This study examined the association between physical multimorbidity (≥ 2 physical diseases) and loneliness in the general population and its potential mediators. Data came from the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2007 (N = 7403, aged ≥16 years). Information was obtained on 20 doctor diagnosed physical conditions that were present in the previous year. An item from the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ) was used to obtain information on loneliness. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations. An increasing number of physical diseases was associated with higher odds for loneliness. Compared to no physical diseases, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval: CI) for loneliness increased from 1.34 (1.13-1.59) to 2.82 (2.11-3.78) between one and ≥5 physical diseases. This association was particularly strong in the youngest age group (i.e. 16-44 years). The loneliness-physical multimorbidity association was significantly mediated by stressful life events (% mediated 11.1%-30.5%), anxiety (30.2%), and depression (15.4%). Physical multimorbidity is associated with increased odds for loneliness. Prospective research is now needed to further elucidate this association and the factors that underlie it.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34492 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0191651 (DOI)000423412500065 ()29364978 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041125808 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Takahashi, H., Nakahachi, T., Stickley, A., Ishitobi, M. & Kamio, Y. (2018). Relationship between physiological and parent-observed auditory over-responsiveness in children with typical development and those with autism spectrum disorders.. Autism, 22(3), 291-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between physiological and parent-observed auditory over-responsiveness in children with typical development and those with autism spectrum disorders.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this study was to investigate relationships between caregiver-reported sensory processing abnormalities, and the physiological index of auditory over-responsiveness evaluated using acoustic startle response measures, in children with autism spectrum disorders and typical development. Mean acoustic startle response magnitudes in response to 65-105 dB stimuli, in increments of 10 dB, were analyzed in children with autism spectrum disorders and with typical development. Average peak startle latency was also examined. We examined the relationship of these acoustic startle response measures to parent-reported behavioral sensory processing patterns in everyday situations, assessed using the Sensory Profile for all participants. Low-threshold scores on the Sensory Profile auditory section were related to acoustic startle response magnitudes at 75 and 85 dB, but not to the lower intensities of 65 dB. The peak startle latency and acoustic startle response magnitudes at low-stimuli intensities of 65 and 75 dB were significantly related to the low-threshold quadrants (sensory sensitivity and sensation avoiding) scores and to the high-threshold quadrant of sensation seeking. Our results suggest that physiological assessment provides further information regarding auditory over-responsiveness to less-intense stimuli and its relationship to caregiver-observed sensory processing abnormalities in everyday situations.

Keywords
acoustic startle response, autism spectrum disorders, hypersensitivity, phenotype, response latency
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32261 (URN)10.1177/1362361316680497 (DOI)000432046600007 ()28286962 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046744648 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-16 Created: 2017-03-16 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Koyanagi, A., Oh, H., Stickley, A., Stubbs, B., Veronese, N., Vancampfort, D., . . . DeVylder, J. E. (2018). Sibship size, birth order and psychotic experiences: Evidence from 43 low- and middle-income countries. Schizophrenia Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sibship size, birth order and psychotic experiences: Evidence from 43 low- and middle-income countries
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Schizophrenia Research, ISSN 0920-9964, E-ISSN 1573-2509Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background Sibship size and birth order may be contributing factors to the multifactorial etiology of psychosis. Specifically, several studies have shown that sibship size and birth order are associated with schizophrenia. However, there are no studies on their association with psychotic experiences (PE). Methods Cross-sectional, community-based data from 43 low- and middle-income countries which participated in the World Health Survey were analyzed. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to identify four types of past 12-month PE. The association of sibship size and birth order with PE was assessed with multivariable logistic regression. Results The final sample consisted of 212,920 adults [mean (SD) age 38.1 (16.0) years; 50.7% females]. In the multivariable analysis, compared to individuals with no siblings, the OR increased linearly from 1.26 (95%CI = 1.01–1.56) to 1.72 (95%CI = 1.41–2.09) among those with 1 and ≥ 9 siblings, respectively. Compared to the first-born, middle-born individuals were more likely to have PE when having a very high number of siblings (i.e. ≥9). Conclusions Future studies should examine the environmental and biological factors underlying the association between sibship size/birth order and PE. Specifically, it may be important to examine the unmeasured factors, such as childhood infections and adversities that may be related to both family structure and PE.

Keywords
Psychotic experience, Risk factor, Sibship size, Birth order
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35736 (URN)10.1016/j.schres.2018.06.019 (DOI)29929772 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048792554 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-06-25 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Tingstedt, O., Lindblad, F., Koposov, R., Blatný, M., Hrdlicka, M., Stickley, A. & Ruchkin, V. (2018). Somatic symptoms and internalizing problems in urban youth: a cross-cultural comparison of Czech and Russian adolescents.. European Journal of Public Health, 28(3), 480-484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somatic symptoms and internalizing problems in urban youth: a cross-cultural comparison of Czech and Russian adolescents.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 480-484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although the association between somatic complaints and internalizing problems (anxiety, somatic anxiety and depression) is well established, it remains unclear whether the pattern of this relationship differs by gender and in different cultures. The aim of this study was to examine cross-cultural and gender-specific differences in the association between somatic complaints and internalizing problems in youth from the Czech Republic and Russia.

Methods: The Social and Health Assessment, a self-report survey, was completed by representative community samples of adolescents, age 12-17 years, from the Czech Republic (N = 4770) and Russia (N = 2728).

Results: A strong association was observed between somatic complaints and internalizing psychopathology. Although the levels of internalizing problems differed by country and gender, they increased together with and largely in a similar way to somatic complaints for boys and girls in both countries.

Conclusion: The association between somatic symptoms and internalizing problems seems to be similar for boys and girls across cultures.

National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34493 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky001 (DOI)000434046900019 ()29373646 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048614419 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-06-29Bibliographically approved
Inoue, Y., Stickley, A., Yazawa, A., Aida, J., Kawachi, I., Kondo, K. & Fujiwara, T. (2017). Adverse childhood experiences, exposure to a natural disaster and posttraumatic stress disorder among survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse childhood experiences, exposure to a natural disaster and posttraumatic stress disorder among survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, ISSN 2045-7960, E-ISSN 1827-4331, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims.: To investigate whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) modify the impact of exposure to a natural disaster (the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami) on the occurrence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among older people. Methods.: Data were collected as part of the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES), which is an on-going epidemiological survey investigating social determinants of health among older people across Japan. Information on PTSD symptoms based on the Screening Questionnaire for Disaster Mental Health, traumatic exposure to the earthquake (i.e., house damage and loss of relatives/friends during the earthquake/tsunami) and ACEs was obtained from 580 participants aged 65 or older living in Iwanuma City, Miyagi Prefecture, which suffered severe damage as a result of the earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in March 2011. Associations were examined using Poisson regression analysis with a robust variance estimator after adjusting for covariates. Results.: The prevalence of PTSD was 9.7% in this population; compared to those with no traumatic experience, the prevalence of PTSD was approximately two times higher among those who experienced the loss of close friends/relatives (PR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.11–3.03, p = 0.018), or whose house was damaged (PR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.07–4.34, p = 0.032). ACE was not significantly associated with PTSD. Stratified analyses by the presence of ACE showed that damage due to the earthquake/tsunami was associated with PTSD only among those without ACEs; more specifically, among non-ACE respondents the PR of PTSD associated with house damage was 6.67 (95% CI = 1.66–26.80), while for the loss of a relative or a close friend it was 3.56 (95% CI = 1.18–10.75). In contrast, no statistically significant associations were observed among those with ACEs. Conclusion.: Following the Great East Japan earthquake/tsunami in 2011 a higher risk of developing PTSD symptoms was observed in 2013 especially among older individuals without ACEs. This suggests that ACEs might affect how individuals respond to subsequent traumatic events later in life.

Keywords
elderly, epidemiology, population survey, PTSD
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32715 (URN)10.1017/S2045796017000233 (DOI)2-s2.0-85019176671 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-06-07 Created: 2017-06-07 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1260-2223

Search in DiVA

Show all publications