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Koyanagi, A., Veronese, N., Vancampfort, D., Stickley, A., Jackson, S. E., Oh, H., . . . Smith, L. (2020). Association of bullying victimization with overweight and obesity among adolescents from 41 low- and middle-income countries. Pediatric Obesity, 15(1), Article ID e12571.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of bullying victimization with overweight and obesity among adolescents from 41 low- and middle-income countries
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2020 (English)In: Pediatric Obesity, ISSN 2047-6302, E-ISSN 2047-6310, Vol. 15, no 1, article id e12571Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Data on the association between overweight/obesity and bullying victimization among adolescents are scarce from low- and middle-income countries.

OBJECTIVES: We assessed the associations between overweight/obesity and bullying victimization in 41 low- and middle-income countries.

METHODS: Cross-sectional data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey were analysed. Data on past 30-day bullying victimization (including type) and body mass index based on measured weight and height were collected. The 2007 WHO Child Growth reference was used to define overweight and obesity. Multivariable logistic regression (multinomial and binary) and meta-analyses based on country-wise estimates were conducted. Data on 114 240 adolescents aged 12 to 15 years were analysed (mean age [SD], 13.8 [1.0] y; 48.8% girls).

RESULTS: Among girls, compared with normal weight, overweight (OR = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16; between-country heterogeneity I2  = 0.0%) and obesity (OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07-1.34; I2  = 0.0%) were associated with significantly higher odds for any bullying victimization, but no significant association was observed among boys. However, overweight and obesity were both associated with significantly increased odds for bullying by being made fun of because of physical appearance among both sexes-obesity (vs normal weight): girls OR = 3.42 (95% CI, 2.49-4.71); boys OR = 2.38 (95% CI, 1.67-3.37).

CONCLUSIONS: Effective strategies to reduce bullying of children with overweight/obesity are needed in low- and middle-income countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
adolescents, bullying victimization, epidemiology, obesity, overweight
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38707 (URN)10.1111/ijpo.12571 (DOI)000490336800001 ()31389204 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070515654 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Waldman, K., Ueda, M., Koyanagi, A., Sumiyoshi, T., Narita, Z., . . . Oh, H. (2020). Childhood neglect and suicidal behavior: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.. International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, 103, Article ID 104400.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood neglect and suicidal behavior: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, ISSN 0145-2134, E-ISSN 1873-7757, Vol. 103, article id 104400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although child neglect is common, there has been comparatively little research on it or its specific forms and their effects on mental health in adulthood.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the association between exposure to different forms of childhood neglect and lifetime suicidal behavior among a nationally representative sample of adults in the U.S. general population.

METHODS: Data were analyzed from 5665 adults that were drawn from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Information was obtained on 'care', 'supervisory' and 'medical' neglect in childhood and lifetime suicidal behavior (ideation, plan, attempt). Lifetime psychiatric disorders were based on the World Mental Health - Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the associations.

RESULTS: In fully adjusted models, any neglect was associated with significantly increased odds for all forms of suicidal behavior (suicidal ideation, odds ratio [OR]: 1.80, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.29; plan, OR: 2.27, 95 % CI: 1.78-2.91; attempt, OR: 2.05, 95 % CI: 1.63-2.59, all p < 0.001). In unadjusted analyses all individual forms of neglect were significantly associated with all forms of suicidal behavior. However, when all forms of neglect were included together in the fully adjusted models, care neglect was no longer significantly associated with any form of suicidal behavior.

CONCLUSION: Different forms of childhood neglect are associated with suicidal behavior in adults independent of common mental disorders. Future studies should focus on childhood neglect subtypes in order to better understand the effects of neglect on adult mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Child maltreatment, Mental health, NCS-R, Suicide
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40366 (URN)10.1016/j.chiabu.2020.104400 (DOI)32146267 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85080974569 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-11 Created: 2020-03-11 Last updated: 2020-03-31Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Waldman, K., Sumiyoshi, T., Narita, Z., Shirama, A., Shin, J. I. & Oh, H. (2020). Childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Early Intervention in Psychiatry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences: Findings from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication
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2020 (English)In: Early Intervention in Psychiatry, ISSN 1751-7885, E-ISSN 1751-7893Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIM: Childhood adversities have been linked to an increased risk for psychosis. However, as yet, there has been comparatively little research on the effects of neglect. This study examined the association between childhood physical neglect and psychotic experiences (PEs) in a general population sample.

METHODS: Data were analysed from 2308 individuals collected during the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R). Information on lifetime PEs was collected with the WHO-CIDI Psychosis Screen. Respondents also reported on five forms of childhood neglect (went hungry, went without necessities, went unsupervised, lacked medical care, chores too difficult/dangerous). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations.

RESULTS: In models adjusted for sociodemographic and psychiatric disorder variables, aggregated physical neglect scores (continuous/dichotomized) were associated with significantly increased odds for any lifetime PEs. All individual forms of neglect except went without necessities (odds ratio [OR]: 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98-1.50) were significantly associated with PEs with ORs ranging from 1.28 (95% CI: 1.08-1.51, went unsupervised) to 1.53 (95% CI: 1.19-1.97, went without medical care). In models that were further adjusted for co-occurring forms of neglect and childhood physical abuse, doing chores that were too difficult/dangerous continued to be associated with significantly increased odds for PEs (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.03-1.61).

CONCLUSIONS: Childhood physical neglect is associated with significantly increased odds for PEs in the general population. Screening for childhood adversities and PEs among potential patients may be important for the early detection of individuals at high risk for psychosis, as well as for formulating comprehensive and effective treatment plans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2020
Keywords
NCS-R, United States, epidemiology, neglect, psychotic experiences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40214 (URN)10.1111/eip.12932 (DOI)000512532200001 ()32048480 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079407973 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Oh, H., Sumiyoshi, T., Mckee, M. & Koyanagi, A. (2020). Injury and depression among 212 039 individuals in 40 low- and middle-income countries. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, 29, Article ID e32.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injury and depression among 212 039 individuals in 40 low- and middle-income countries
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2020 (English)In: Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences, ISSN 2045-7960, E-ISSN 1827-4331, Vol. 29, article id e32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimsAlthough injuries have been linked to worse mental health, little is known about this association among the general population in low- A nd middle-income countries (LAMICs). This study examined the association between injuries and depression in 40 LAMICs that participated in the World Health Survey.MethodsCross-sectional information was obtained from 212 039 community-based adults on the past 12-month experience of road traffic and other (non-traffic) injuries and depression, which was assessed using questions based on the World Mental Health Survey version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Multivariable logistic regression analysis and meta-analysis were used to examine associations.ResultsThe overall prevalence (95% CI) of past 12-month traffic injury, other injury, and depression was 2.8% (2.6-3.0%), 4.8% (4.6-5.0%) and 7.4% (7.1-7.8%), respectively. The prevalence of traffic injuries [range 0.1% (Ethiopia) to 5.1% (Bangladesh)], and other (non-traffic) injuries [range 0.9% (Myanmar) to 12.1% (Kenya)] varied widely across countries. After adjusting for demographic variables, alcohol consumption and smoking, the pooled OR (95%CI) for depression among individuals experiencing traffic injury based on a meta-analysis was 1.72 (1.48-1.99), and 2.04 (1.85-2.24) for those with other injuries. There was little between-country heterogeneity in the association between either form of injury and depression, although for traffic injuries, significant heterogeneity was observed between groups by country-income level (p = 0.043) where the pooled association was strongest in upper middle-income countries (OR = 2.37) and weakest in low-income countries (OR = 1.46).ConclusionsAlerting health care providers in LAMICs to the increased risk of worse mental health among injury survivors and establishing effective trauma treatment systems to reduce the detrimental effects of injury should now be prioritised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2020
Keywords
Depression, epidemiology, injury, meta-analysis, World Health Survey
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38298 (URN)10.1017/S2045796019000210 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065656007 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-11 Created: 2019-06-11 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Koyanagi, A., Ueda, M., Inoue, Y., Waldman, K. & Oh, H. (2020). Physical multimorbidity and suicidal behavior in the general population in the United States. Journal of Affective Disorders, 260, 604-609
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical multimorbidity and suicidal behavior in the general population in the United States
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 260, p. 604-609Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: As yet, there has been little research on the association between physical multimorbidity (the co-occurrence of two or more physical illnesses) and suicide, and results have been mixed. This study examined if physical multimorbidity is associated with suicidal behavior in the general population in the United States. Method: Data were analyzed from 15,311 adults that were obtained from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES). Information was obtained on nine self-reported physical health conditions and lifetime suicidal behavior (suicidal ideation, plan, and attempts). Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations. Results: An increasing number of physical health conditions was associated with higher odds for suicidal behavior. Compared to those with no physical conditions, individuals with ≥ 4 physical illnesses had 2.99, 4.82, and 4.39 times higher odds for reporting suicidal ideation, a suicide plan, and suicide attempts, respectively. An interaction analysis showed that for suicide attempts the association was stronger in younger rather than older adults. Limitations: The data were cross-sectional and information on physical conditions and suicidal behavior was self-reported and may have been subject to reporting bias. Conclusions: As multimorbidity has increased in recent decades in the United States, alerting medical practitioners to the increased risk of suicidal behavior in adults who have multiple medical conditions as well as screening for suicidality in this group may be important preventive measures to help reduce suicidal behavior in the general population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Age, CPES, Physical illness, Suicidality
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39165 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.09.042 (DOI)000490428300096 ()31541971 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85072262712 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, J., Schwab-Stone, M., Stickley, A. & Ruchkin, V. (2020). Risk and Protective Factors for Problematic Drinking in Early Adolescence: A Systematic Approach. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 51(2), 231-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk and Protective Factors for Problematic Drinking in Early Adolescence: A Systematic Approach
2020 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alcohol use during early adolescence is associated with other risk behaviors as well as future health problems. Within the design of a larger prospective research program, a cohort of U.S. inner-city sixth-grade students (N = 1573, mean age = 12.10) were assessed and reassessed in the seventh-grade. Self-reported information was obtained on problems related to alcohol, fixed markers of risk (e.g. sex, age, SES), individual and interpersonal factors (e.g. internalizing and externalizing symptoms) and contextual factors (e.g. substance availability). Alcohol-related problems in seventh grade were foremost predicted by individual and interpersonal factors in the sixth grade including depressive symptoms, conduct problems, a decreased perception of wrongdoing, and affiliation with delinquent peers. In addition, alcohol use in the sixth grade and being of Hispanic or White ethnicity was also associated with subsequent alcohol-related problems. Interventions should be directed towards assessing and treating individual risk factors such as depression and externalizing symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Alcohol problems, Conduct problems, Depression, Early adolescence, Ethnicity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38919 (URN)10.1007/s10578-019-00925-1 (DOI)000519345100007 ()31468271 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071461760 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-06 Created: 2019-09-06 Last updated: 2020-03-26Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, J., Sjöblom, S., Schwab-Stone, M., Stickley, A. & Ruchkin, V. (2020). Risk Factors Associated with Alcohol Use in Early Adolescence among American Inner-City Youth: A Longitudinal Study. Substance Use & Misuse, 55(3), 358-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk Factors Associated with Alcohol Use in Early Adolescence among American Inner-City Youth: A Longitudinal Study
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2020 (English)In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 358-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Early alcohol use is associated with an increased risk for later alcohol dependence, as well as social and mental health problems. In this study, we investigate the risk factors (internalizing and externalizing behaviors) associated with early alcohol consumption over a period of 1 year, and examine whether the association is sex-specific. Methods: U.S. inner-city adolescents (N = 1785, Mean age = 12.11) were assessed and reassessed in the sixth and seventh grades (Mean age = 13.10). Self-reported information was obtained on the lifetime level of alcohol consumption, internalizing (depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress [PTS]), and externalizing behaviors (sensation seeking, conduct problems and affiliation with delinquent peers). Associations between the variables were examined using structural equation modeling (SEM). Results: In an adjusted SEM analysis drinking by the sixth grade was primarily associated with externalizing behaviors, whereas PTS was linked to lower levels of alcohol consumption. In addition, alcohol consumption and greater externalizing behaviors by the sixth grade predicted higher alcohol consumption by the seventh grade, whereas anxiety and African American ethnicity were associated with less alcohol consumption. No sex differences were found in the association between internalizing and externalizing behaviors and drinking. However, in the adjusted SEM analysis female sex predicted higher lifetime consumption by the seventh grade. Conclusion: Sensation seeking behavior, conduct problems and affiliation with delinquent peers should be regarded as risk factors and taken into consideration when planning prevention efforts in order to decrease alcohol use in early adolescence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
adolescents, Alcohol use, externalizing symptoms, internalizing symptoms, longitudinal study
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39576 (URN)10.1080/10826084.2019.1671867 (DOI)000494063100001 ()31686574 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074782547 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-12-11 Created: 2019-12-11 Last updated: 2020-03-02Bibliographically approved
Jacob, L., Smith, L., Haro, J. M., Stickley, A. & Koyanagi, A. (2020). Serious physical injury and depressive symptoms among adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries. Journal of Affective Disorders, 264, 172-180
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Serious physical injury and depressive symptoms among adolescents aged 12–15 years from 21 low- and middle-income countries
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 264, p. 172-180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Little is known about the relationship between physical injury and depression in youths from low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the association between serious physical injury and depressive symptoms among adolescents in 21 LMICs. Methods: Data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey (2003–2008) were analyzed. Serious physical injury and depressive symptoms in the past 12 months were assessed with self-report measures. The association between serious physical injury and depressive symptoms was examined using multivariable logistic regression analysis and meta-analysis. Results: The final sample consisted of 44,333 adolescents aged 12–15 years. After adjustment for sex, age, food insecurity, alcohol consumption, and country, an increasing number of serious physical injuries in the past 12 months was associated with increments in the odds for depressive symptoms in a dose-dependent fashion. Those who had ≥6 serious injuries (vs. no injuries) were 2.79 (95%CI=2.23–3.48) times more likely to have depressive symptoms. The pooled odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) for the association between at least one serious physical injury and depressive symptoms obtained by meta-analysis based on country-wise estimates was 1.83 (1.67–2.01) with a moderate level of between-country heterogeneity (I2=56.0%). Limitations: This was a cross-sectional study and causality of the association cannot be deduced. Conclusions: Serious physical injury may be a risk factor for depressive symptoms among adolescents in LMICs. Efforts to prevent physical injury and the provision of adequate health care for those who are injured may improve mental wellbeing among adolescents in this setting.

Keywords
Adolescents, Depressive symptoms, Epidemiology, Low- and middle-income countries, Physical injury
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39689 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.12.026 (DOI)000510380300022 ()32056747 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076633508 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-03-04Bibliographically approved
Inagawa, T., Narita, Z., Sugawara, N., Maruo, K., Stickley, A., Yokoi, Y. & Sumiyoshi, T. (2019). A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Multisession Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Cognition in Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 50(4), 273-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Multisession Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Cognition in Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment
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2019 (English)In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, ISSN 1550-0594, E-ISSN 2169-5202, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 273-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There have been increasing efforts to investigate the effects of neuromodulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), on cognitive impairment in dementia and related conditions. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we assessed the efficacy of multisession anodal tDCS compared with sham stimulation for improving global cognition and specific cognitive domains in both Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment. Eight articles meeting the criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis were selected. Five studies used the Mini-Mental State Examination to examine mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In a fixed-effect model, there was a mean difference in the change score of -0.13 points. Three trials for dementia using the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognition showed a mean difference of -0.53 points. At present, there is a lack of clear evidence concerning the efficacy of multisession anodal tDCS due to the small number of studies and different measures used. This underscores the need for further investigations using larger samples and common outcome measures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
brain stimulation, cognition, meta-analysis, neurocognitive disorder, tDCS
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36510 (URN)10.1177/1550059418800889 (DOI)000469869900006 ()30229671 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059696844 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-10-09 Created: 2018-10-09 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Stickley, A., Koposov, R., Koyanagi, A., Inoue, Y. & Ruchkin, V. (2019). ADHD and depressive symptoms in adolescents: the role of community violence exposure. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 54(6), 683-691
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ADHD and depressive symptoms in adolescents: the role of community violence exposure
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2019 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 683-691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Comorbid depression is common in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As yet, however, little is known about the factors associated with co-occurring depression in this population. To address this research gap, the current study examined the role of community violence exposure in the association between ADHD symptoms and depression.

METHODS: Data came from 505 Russian adolescents [mean age 14.37 (SD = 0.96)] who had teacher-reported information on ADHD symptoms that was collected in conjunction with the Social and Health Assessment (SAHA). Adolescent self-reports of witnessing and being a victim of community violence were also obtained while depressive symptoms were self-assessed with an adapted version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations.

RESULTS: In univariable analyses, both witnessing and being a victim of violence were associated with significantly increased odds for depressive symptoms in adolescents with ADHD symptoms compared to non-ADHD adolescents who had not experienced community violence. However, in the multivariable analysis only being a victim of violence continued to be associated with significantly increased odds for depression [odds ratio (OR) 4.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33-16.35].

CONCLUSION: Exposure to community violence may be associated with depression in adolescents with ADHD symptoms. Clinicians should enquire about exposure to community violence in adolescents with ADHD/ADHD symptoms. Early therapeutic interventions to address the effects of violence exposure in adolescents with ADHD may be beneficial for preventing depression in this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Adolescent, Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, Depressive symptoms, Violent victimization, Witness violence
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37622 (URN)10.1007/s00127-019-01662-5 (DOI)000469248100004 ()30706080 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060842347 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Projects
Adverse childhood experiences, alcohol use in adulthood and mortality: Examining the associations using retrospective survey data and record linkage in Estonia [50/2014_OSS]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1260-2223

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