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Saunders, F., Gilek, M., Ikauniece, A., Tafon, R. V., Gee, K. & Zaucha, J. (2020). Theorizing Social Sustainability and Justice in Marine Spatial Planning: Democracy, Diversity, and Equity. Sustainability, 12(6), Article ID 2560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theorizing Social Sustainability and Justice in Marine Spatial Planning: Democracy, Diversity, and Equity
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2020 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 6, article id 2560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article elaborates a conceptual framework to examine social sustainability in marinespatial planning (MSP). Based on a critical literature review of key texts on social sustainabilityin MSP and the broader sustainable development literature we show the need to elaborate acogent and comprehensive approach for the analysis and pursuit of social sustainability linkedto the sea. We then theorize social sustainability by developing a conceptual framework throughintegrating three dimensions: Recognition, Representation and Distribution. While these three socialsustainability/justice features clearly overlap and are interdependent in practice, the conceptualthinking underpinning each of them is distinctive and when taken together they contributetowards conceiving social sustainability as a pillar of sustainability. Our approach can support ananalysis/evaluation of MSP in that, first, its broad scope and adaptability makes it suitable to examinethe wide range of claims, demands, and concerns that are likely to be encountered across dierentpractical MSP settings. Second, it acknowledges the opportunities and challenges of assessing,implementing, and achieving social justice within a broader sustainability framework.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: MDPI, 2020
Keywords
marine governance, social sustainability, social justice, conceptual framework, participation, representation, democracy, equity, distribution, recognition, distribution
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40425 (URN)10.3390/su12062560 (DOI)
Projects
Taking Social Sustainability to the Sea (ÖSS)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 46/18
Available from: 2020-03-24 Created: 2020-03-24 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved
Nthane, T. T., Saunders, F., Gallardo Fernández, G. L. & Raemaekers, S. (2020). Toward Sustainability of South African Small-Scale Fisheries Leveraging ICT Transformation Pathways. Sustainability, 12(2), 1-22, Article ID 743.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward Sustainability of South African Small-Scale Fisheries Leveraging ICT Transformation Pathways
2020 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 1-22, article id 743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Though Internet and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have been employed in small-scale fisheries (SSFs) globally, they are seldom systematically explored for the ways in which they facilitate equality, democracy and sustainability. Our study explored how ICTs in South African small-scale fisheries are leveraged towards value chain upgrading, collective action and institutional sustainability—key issues that influence small-scale fishery contributions to marine resource sustainability. We held a participatory workshop as part of ongoing research in the town of Lambert’s Bay, South Africa, in collaboration with small-scale fishers and the Abalobi ICT project. We mapped fisher value chain challenges and explored the role of ICT-driven transformation pathways, adopting Wright’s ‘Real Utopian’ framework as the lens through which to explore equality, democracy and institutional sustainability. We found Abalobi’s ICT platform had the potential to facilitate deeper meanings of democracy that incorporate socio-economic reform, collective action and institutional sustainability in South Africa’s small-scale fisheries. Where fishers are not engaged beyond passive generators of data, this had the potential to undermine the goals of increasing power parity between small-scale fisheries and other stakeholders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2020
Keywords
sustainability, transformation, fishing
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-40079 (URN)10.3390/su12020743 (DOI)2-s2.0-85079750513 (Scopus ID)
Funder
International Social Science CouncilSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-03-06Bibliographically approved
Saunders, F. P., Gilek, M. & Tafon, R. (2019). Adding People to the Sea: Conceptualizing Social Sustainability in Maritime Spatial Planning. In: Jacek Zaucha & Kira Gee (Ed.), Maritime Spatial Planning: past, present, future (pp. 175-199). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adding People to the Sea: Conceptualizing Social Sustainability in Maritime Spatial Planning
2019 (English)In: Maritime Spatial Planning: past, present, future / [ed] Jacek Zaucha & Kira Gee, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 175-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

While there is growing critique emerging to address social sustainability in marine/maritime spatial planning (MSP), overwhelmingly attention has been on governance, economic and environmental aspects. This chapter redresses this by proposing a conceptual framework to elucidate key features of social sustainability in MSP. The ambition is to both note the existing critique of MSP and go beyond it by more clearly and comprehensively articulating how social sustainability could be conceived in MSP, as well as how this framework could be applied to analyse MSP practice. Key features of social sustainability elaborated are: deepening democratic decision-making, inclusion of socio-cultural values and knowledge, equitable distribution and social cohesion. Finally, the chapter concludes by nominating strategies to give greater visibility to social sustainability as a key MSP concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
Development studies
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies; Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37455 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-98696-8_8 (DOI)000487297300009 ()2186/3.1.1/2014 (Local ID)978-3-319-98695-1 (ISBN)978-3-319-98696-8 (ISBN)2186/3.1.1/2014 (Archive number)2186/3.1.1/2014 (OAI)
Projects
BONUS BALTSPACE project
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilThe Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 27/2014Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council
Note

This work was the result of (1) the BONUS BALTSPACE project and was supported by BONUS (Art 185), funded jointly by the EU, Swedish Research Council FORMAS and other Baltic Sea national funding institutions and (2) research funding from The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies.

Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Hassler, B., Gilek, M., Jönsson, A. M. & Saunders, F. (2019). Cooperating for sustainable regional marine governance: The case of fisheries and nutrient runoff from agriculture to the Baltic Sea, Synthesis report. Huddinge: Södertörns högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cooperating for sustainable regional marine governance: The case of fisheries and nutrient runoff from agriculture to the Baltic Sea, Synthesis report
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Over-fishing and eutrophication (too much nutrients) are among the most severe threats to the ecosystems of the Baltic Sea and the ecosystem services they provide. Despite the well-known fact that effective and sustainable management requires cooperation – among as well as within states – appropriate frameworks that work have not yet been constructed and successfully applied. This report summarises findings from a research project on cooperation for sustainable marine governance of the Baltic Sea carried out between 2013 and 2018. Three aspects of central relevance for the understanding of regional cooperation in environmental governance are distinguished: interests, knowledge and management. It is shown that it is not enough to design cooperative arrangements that make the group of users, stakeholders or states better off than without such an arrangement. It is furthermore required that all actors have individual interests to participate, and that free-riding on others’ contributions can be controlled. When this is not the case, effective abatement of eutrophication is not likely to be forthcoming, even though aggregated benefits from such measures are larger than expected costs.

Knowledge often play important roles in marine environmental governance, not least in relation to so-called epistemic communities, that is, groups of experts that share a common understanding of the environmental problem at hand, and how to address it. It is shown that the coherence of the epistemic group can be a crucial factor influencing its impact. In both abatement of eutrophication and management of fish stocks, these expert groups have been somewhat divided, which has limited their impact.

Modes of management can influence cooperation and outcomes in ways that can be difficult to predict. Although environmental taxes and subsidies are powerful policy instruments in contemporary governance, they must be carefully crafted to fit into exiting norms and contexts to be effective. It is shown that monetary incentives targeting farmers’ use of fertilisers tend not to be effective when they are at odds with deeply held norms on what constitute a “good farmer”. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2019. p. 76
Series
Working Paper, ISSN 1404-1480 ; 2019:1
Keywords
Development studies, Environmental governance, regional cooperation, eutrophication, fisheries, Baltic Sea
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37847 (URN)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A043-2012
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2020-02-03Bibliographically approved
Saunders, F., Gilek, M., Day, J. C. C., Hassler, B., McCann, J. & Smythe, T. (2019). Examining the role of integration in marine spatial planning: Towards an analytical framework to understand challenges in diverse settings. Ocean and Coastal Management, 169, 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Examining the role of integration in marine spatial planning: Towards an analytical framework to understand challenges in diverse settings
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2019 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, Vol. 169, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Development studies, marine spatial planning, integration, sectors, stakeholders, knowledge, policy
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36931 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2018.11.011 (DOI)000459518700001 ()2-s2.0-85058030474 (Scopus ID)2186/3.1.1/2014 (Local ID)2186/3.1.1/2014 (Archive number)2186/3.1.1/2014 (OAI)
Projects
BALTSPACE
Funder
BONUS - Science for a better future of the Baltic Sea regionThe Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 27/2014
Note

This article develops an integration framework to analyse MSP practices across several Baltic Sea Region cases studies as well as cases studies from Australia (Great Barrier Reef) and the US (Rhode Island). While integration has been universally adopted as a policy principle to strive for, there is confusion about what it means, how to do it and what it implies in different MSP contexts. The task set here was not to fix a singular meaning to integration and what work it should do in MSP, but to better understand particular uses of the concept and their purposes in MSP practices. To do we consider existing literature to develop a five-part analytical framework, which includes cross-border, policy/sector, knowledge, stakeholder and temporal integration dimensions. The framework was applied to the several cases and usefully illustrated a variety of integration-related MSP questions, challenges and responses. Furthermore, we argue that an analytical focus on the multidimensionality of integration can help shed light on the various ‘balances’ related to sustainability commonly sought after in MSP – between environmental protection and maritime development; between strategic decision-making and participation; between scientific and experiential knowledge; on current problems and a concern for the future, among others.

Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2020-02-24Bibliographically approved
Piwowarczyk, J., Gee, K., Gilek, M., Hassler, B., Luttmann, A., Maack, L., . . . Zaucha, J. (2019). Insights into integration challenges in the Baltic Sea Region marine spatial planning: Implications for the HELCOM-VASAB principles. Ocean and Coastal Management (175), 98-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insights into integration challenges in the Baltic Sea Region marine spatial planning: Implications for the HELCOM-VASAB principles
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2019 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, no 175, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Development studies
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37988 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2019.03.023 (DOI)000469154900009 ()2-s2.0-85064041176 (Scopus ID)
Projects
BaltSpace
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European StudiesBONUS - Science for a better future of the Baltic Sea region
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Hassler, B., Blažauskas, N., Gee, K., Luttmann, A., Morf, A., Piwowarczyk, J., . . . Zaucha, J. (2019). New generation EU directives, sustainability, and the role of transnationalcoordination in Baltic Sea maritime spatial planning. Ocean and Coastal Management (169), 254-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New generation EU directives, sustainability, and the role of transnationalcoordination in Baltic Sea maritime spatial planning
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2019 (English)In: Ocean and Coastal Management, ISSN 0964-5691, E-ISSN 1873-524X, no 169, p. 254-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The EU MSP Directive is an example of a so-called new generation directive, which gives Member States room foradaptation to national contexts. The main objective in this article is to identify and analyse potential obstacles toeffective and efficient planning caused by the diversity among national MSP frameworks that the Directive'sbroad regulatory boundaries have led to. It is shown that planning approaches can differ substantially betweenneighbouring countries, which can make it challenging to coordinate across national borders. Divergence betweennational MSP frameworks can also emerge from how political, jurisdictional and, administrative systemsand traditions are organised in different Member States. It is shown that neighbouring countries can divergesubstantially in how the ecological, economic and social dimensions of sustainability are balanced, which canmake transnational coordination challenging. Furthermore, it is shown that stakeholder consultations differamong Member States in terms of, for example, who were invited, how the consultations were undertaken, andthe role they play in relation to political decision-making. Because of these, and other differences in how MSPframeworks are being developed in the Member States, it is suggested that regional integration should bepromoted with discretion. From this perspective, it seems reasonable to embrace diversity, while simultaneouslypromoting the adaptive management of coordination problems at lower levels, when, or if, they emerge or canbe foreseen. Thus, increased integration of national MSP frameworks should be viewed as an instrument toreduce concrete efficiency losses, rather than as an intrinsic good.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Development studies, Baltic sea, Sustainability, Ecosystem approach, Context-dependence, Transnational integration, Marine spatial planning, Stakeholder participation
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37168 (URN)10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2018.12.025 (DOI)000459518700026 ()2-s2.0-85059465398 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasThe Foundation for Baltic and East European StudiesBONUS - Science for a better future of the Baltic Sea region
Available from: 2019-01-05 Created: 2019-01-05 Last updated: 2020-03-09Bibliographically approved
Tafon, R. V., Saunders, F. & Gilek, M. (2019). Re-reading marine spatial planning through Foucault, Haugaard and others: An analysis of domination, empowerment and freedom. Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, 21(6), 754-768
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Re-reading marine spatial planning through Foucault, Haugaard and others: An analysis of domination, empowerment and freedom
2019 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Policy and Planning, ISSN 1523-908X, E-ISSN 1522-7200, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 754-768Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Marine spatial planning (MSP) has emerged as a radical approach to achieving sustainable development objectives at sea. While critics challenge its avowed radicalness, often through highlighting dominative processes, more insidious mechanisms of restricted agency remain under-elaborated, as are the productive power and potential of planning. This paper offers a more robust and balanced reading of MSP/power. First, drawing on Haugaard, we read MSP as providing actors with dispositional power to act in concert, thus entailing a move from the risks of ‘resource rush’ to structuring, which facilitates predictability and promotes agency. However, MSP’ing may also restrict agency when (1) powerful actors misuse opportunities for concerted action to pursue sectoral goals; (2) planning fantasies and the planner’s cognitive limitation sustain dominative power-relations; and (3) in setting the boundaries of MSP, bias is mobilized in favor of vested interests. We thus deploy Foucault’s notion of freedom, to analyze the relationship between ‘steering’ and resistance subjectivities, and his concept of parrhesias to consider to what extent, an ethico-political planner may contribute towards more equitable processes and outcomes. We conclude that besides the planner, the state as the ultimate authority in MSP must intervene substantively to minimize differentials in the distribution of actors’social resources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Development studies, Marine spatial planning; agency; empowerment; domination; Foucault and Haugaard
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38064 (URN)10.1080/1523908X.2019.1673155 (DOI)000489951000001 ()2-s2.0-85073939705 (Scopus ID)
Funder
BONUS - Science for a better future of the Baltic Sea region, 185The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 2186/3.1.1/2014
Note

Som manuskript i avhandling. As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2019-04-25 Created: 2019-04-25 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved
Tafon, R. V. & Saunders, F. (2019). The Politics of Land Grabbing: State and corporate power and the (trans)nationalization of resistance in Cameroon. Journal of Agrarian Change, 19(1), 41-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Politics of Land Grabbing: State and corporate power and the (trans)nationalization of resistance in Cameroon
2019 (English)In: Journal of Agrarian Change, ISSN 1471-0358, E-ISSN 1471-0366, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 41-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Approaching land grabbing as a site of politics wherein power functions in the challenge and/or stabilization of agrarian socioecological injustices, we capture agrarian relations in Cameroon in 2 fundamental ways. Drawing on Laclauian insights, we discuss power as a “counter‐hegemonic” practice, to characterize the resistance strategies of local NGOs, in terms of their articulated discourses around the socioecological effects of land grabs, on the one hand, and the political possibilities that this articulatory practice opens, in terms of (trans)nationalizing resistance across social identities and space, on the other hand. Here, the analysis adopts a Foucauldian‐inspired critique with strong commitments towards agrarian socioecological justice, in a context where policies to protect democratic access to land are absent. Second, framed as a hegemonic/governmental “form of rule,” we capture how state and diplomatic actors sought to override dissent and stabilize the contentious land deal. We also show how a moment of presidential “nondecision,” characterized by a hyper‐centralized bureaucracy conjoined with these hegemonic forces to disempower local administrative and judicial leverage, thereby fostering corporate power. The article thus contributes to debates on state and corporate powers, as well as the strategies of, or possibilities and constraints for resistance “from below” to irradiate and structure into a compelling force.

Keywords
Development studies, Cameroon, land grabbing, NGO discourses and alliances, state and corporate power, (trans)national resistance
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34889 (URN)10.1111/joac.12264 (DOI)000453777100003 ()2-s2.0-85058781092 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-25 Created: 2018-04-25 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved
Gallardo-Fernandez, G. L. & Saunders, F. (2018). “Before we asked for permission, now we only give notice”: Women’s entrance into artisanal fisheries in Chile. Maritime Studies, 17(2), 177-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“Before we asked for permission, now we only give notice”: Women’s entrance into artisanal fisheries in Chile
2018 (English)In: Maritime Studies, ISSN 1872-7859, E-ISSN 2212-9790, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 177-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Small-scale fisheries (SSF) in the Global South are increasingly subjected to the internationalisation of food systems. Guided by a feminist political ecology approach, we examine how gender relations and power structures within SSF are changing through policy interventions and market linkages. Chilean women working in SSF have traditionally been unregistered direct producers. Since the early 2000s, however, women have formally entered as fishers within this hitherto male-dominated space. Today, women constitute almost a quarter of artisanal fishers in Chile. While women have become more visible, among others, in their engagement in territorial use rights in fisheries (TURFs), little research attention has been paid to women’s roles within SSF. We redress this shortfall by examining the struggle to obtain TURFs by an all-women seaweed gatherers union in Coliumo (Bio-Bio Region, Chile). Using participatory research tools, we describe key gendered interactions and events over a local struggle for resources. Our findings show how closely related episodes of cooperation and conflict were involved in realising TURFs, which included differently-gendered relationships. While the women implicated in formalising fishing entitlements accrued individual benefit and enhanced their collective standing, the conflict left a deep scar among women in the community.

Keywords
Development studies, Women seaweed gatherers, Gender, TURFs, Power struggles, Coastal resources, Community conflicts, Chile
National Category
Gender Studies Social Anthropology
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36552 (URN)10.1007/s40152-018-0110-z (DOI)000447526400007 ()2-s2.0-85055042237 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 2015-05934International Social Science Council
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2019-11-07Bibliographically approved
Projects
Marine Spatial Planning in the Baltic Sea Region – Integrating Scales, Sectors and Knowledge [27/2014_OSS]; Södertörn University; Publications
Saunders, F. P., Gilek, M. & Tafon, R. (2019). Adding People to the Sea: Conceptualizing Social Sustainability in Maritime Spatial Planning. In: Jacek Zaucha & Kira Gee (Ed.), Maritime Spatial Planning: past, present, future (pp. 175-199). Cham: Palgrave MacmillanSaunders, F., Gilek, M., Day, J. C. C., Hassler, B., McCann, J. & Smythe, T. (2019). Examining the role of integration in marine spatial planning: Towards an analytical framework to understand challenges in diverse settings. Ocean and Coastal Management, 169, 1-9Tafon, R. V., Howarth, D. & Griggs, S. (2019). The Politics of Estonia's Offshore Wind Energy Programme: Discourse, power and marine spatial planning. Environment and Planning. C, Government and Policy, 37(1), 157-176Hassler, B., Blažauskas, N., Gee, K., Luttmann, A., Morf, A., Joanna Piwowarczyk, J., . . . Jacek Zaucha, J. (2018). BONUS BALTSPACE: Deliverable 2.7: New generation EU Directives and the role of transnational coordination: Marine Spatial Planning of the Baltic Sea. Huddinge: Södertörns högskolaTafon, R. V. (2018). Taking power to sea: Towards a post-structuralist discourse theoretical critique of marine spatial planning. Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, 36(2), 58-273Gilek, M., Saunders, F. & Stalmokaite, I. (2018). The Ecosystem Approach and Sustainable Development in Baltic Sea Marine Spatial Planning: The Social Pillar, a ‘Slow Train Coming’. In: David Langlet and Rosemary Rayfuse (Ed.), The Ecosystem Approach in Ocean Planning and Governance: Perspectives from Europe and Beyond (pp. 160-194). Nijhoff: Brill Nijhoff
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2166-5717

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