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Mattsson, Jan-Eric
Publications (10 of 68) Show all publications
Mattsson, J.-E., Lönn, M. & Mutvei, A. (2017). Art studies as tools for understanding observations in science. In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017. Paper presented at 6th New perspectives in science education, Florence, March 16-17, 2017. (pp. 513-516). Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Art studies as tools for understanding observations in science
2017 (English)In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017, Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2017, p. 513-516Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Observations are fundamental in science as they has to include cognitive activities based on the perceived sensations. These activities have to be transformed to written or spoken language. In order to practice and visualize these processes we present a method based on Roland Barthes concepts studium and punctum. About 60 students aiming at becoming primary school teachers (years 4–6) were followed during a period of the first two years of their education. The results on all course examinations during these years (n=17) were compared to the quality of two reflective texts. One from the end of the first year on the impression of art works by David Hockney or Bill Viola, another of experiences from field sites used at the beginning of their studies. They wrote reflections on their experiences including observations and their personal and professional development during their teacher training. The texts where analysed by using the 4 R’s of Doll’s. Results of VARK tests assessing the learning style of the students from the beginning of their education were used. The choice of science courses can be shown to be correlated to different factors depending of the selection of these but there was no general pattern behind the choice of science. Training of observation in different contexts and reflections on these in relation to personal development seem to promote better professional understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it, 2017
Keywords
art studies, observation, studium and punctum, primary school teacher students
National Category
Natural Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33914 (URN)978-88-6292-847-2 (ISBN)
Conference
6th New perspectives in science education, Florence, March 16-17, 2017.
Available from: 2017-12-16 Created: 2017-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Mutvei, A., Lönn, M. & Mattsson, J.-E. (2017). Digestion as an example of integrated teaching of chemistry and biology. Paper presented at XVII IOSTE SYMPOSIUM Science and Technology Education, Braga, July 11-16, 2016.. Conexão Ciencia, 12(2), 89-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digestion as an example of integrated teaching of chemistry and biology
2017 (English)In: Conexão Ciencia, ISSN 1980-7058, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 89-95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most people are uncertain about how nutrients enter and are distributed in the body. They may be capable of naming the different parts of the digestive system on a torso but have vague ideas of the relation between these organs and the chemical processes they govern. Reasons for this are poor understanding of gas exchange, the role of the circulatory system, and that most processes are intracellular. In order to create a more holistic view of the biology and chemistry of digestion these subjects may be taught simultaneously and integrated. Here practical exercises and lectures about digestion and nutrients for pre-service primary school teachers are presented. The practical work included food preparation in order to investigate the change of the properties of the macromolecules of nutrients. A simple drawing of a body was used in order to visualize the routes of nutrients and the role of gas exchange in digestion. An evolutionary perspective on digestion was used in order to explain the ancient origin of most chemical processes in the digestive system and in the whole body. The material produced by the students at their final examinations was used for assessing their use and understanding of concepts, the quality based on Doll’s 4R’s and the degree of holistic understanding of the digestive system. The findings show that the pedagogic design used gives a general picture of digestion and energy transfer usable for teaching in primary school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Formiga/MG, open access, 2017
Keywords
Nutrition; digestion system; evolution teacher training; concepts biology education, chemistry education
National Category
Natural Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33917 (URN)
Conference
XVII IOSTE SYMPOSIUM Science and Technology Education, Braga, July 11-16, 2016.
Available from: 2017-12-17 Created: 2017-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Mutvei, A., Lönn, M. & Mattsson, J.-E. (2017). Technology in preschool: from idea to product. In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017. Paper presented at 6th New perspectives in science education, Florence, March 16-17, 2017. (pp. 604-609). Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technology in preschool: from idea to product
2017 (English)In: Conference proceedings New perspectives in science education: 6th Conference Edition: Florence, Italy: 16-17 March 2017, Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2017, p. 604-609Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teaching pre-service preschool teachers in technology is a challenge. Technology is a fairly new subject in school, students lack experiences and are not aware of the aim of the subject. In addition technology also include the consequences of technological choices for individuals, society and environment. The curriculum for pre-school in Sweden emphasize development of children´s knowledge in science, technology and their ability to identify technology in everyday life. The education of pre-service teachers involves visualization of their own tacit knowledge and experiences to be used in the teaching of technology. Here a course during a three weeks period with 55 pre-service teacher students is presented. They worked in groups with construction exercises, museum visit and outdoor technology walk. The students wrote summaries of the processes together with critical reflections. The written exams on the identification of technology in everyday life were analysed by using the quality markers 4R’s of Doll’s and compared with marks on their examination tasks. Our results show that many students could describe the processes of construction with high quality showing several perspectives of understanding, e.g., the advantage of group activity, their own development of understanding and how to teach children in preschool.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Limena: Libreriauniversitaria.it, 2017
Keywords
Technology, pre-service preschool teachers, construction exercises, museum visit
National Category
Natural Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33915 (URN)978-88-6292-847-2 (ISBN)
Conference
6th New perspectives in science education, Florence, March 16-17, 2017.
Available from: 2017-12-16 Created: 2017-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Mattsson, J.-E., Lönn, M. & Mutvei, A. (2017). To communicate the theory of evolution to all from babies to adults. Paper presented at XVII IOSTE SYMPOSIUM Science and Technology Education, Braga, July 11-16, 2016.. Conexão Ciencia, 12(2), 408-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To communicate the theory of evolution to all from babies to adults
2017 (English)In: Conexão Ciencia, ISSN 1980-7058, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 408-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Teaching evolution is a tricky business. Less teaching seems to give better understanding of the theory. Evolutionary processes are dialectic relations between many actors, individuals, groups, abiotic and biotic factors etc., different from mechanistic descriptions of relations between singular objects in other scientific theories. This difference, in combination with religious beliefs confuses efforts to get understanding and acceptance of the theory of evolution. With the new curriculum for Swedish compulsory school, science education has to be linked to students’ own experiences in order to promote critical thinking and skills useable in daily life. Further, biology in science teaching during the first school years is focused on general observations and fundamental concepts, not on scientific methods and evolutionary processes. Thus, students often experience biology as a subject filled with facts about simple relations and teleological explanations, making the theory of evolution superfluous. The objectives here were to design teaching in evolutionary theory adapted to the professional needs of students and to assess the learning outcome. Three different courses in evolutionary theory were included. Two pre-service teacher training programs, for nursery school and for year 4–6 in the compulsory school, and one for students in environmental studies were included. Assessments of learning outcome were made by analyses of texts written by the students. The quality of the science knowledge content and the personal and professional development were assessed by using the 4 R’s of Doll. Associations between concepts and understanding were evaluated using clustering and ordination statistical techniques. The learning outcome was good showing visible progressions in the understanding. Thus, it is important to assess the understanding of concepts rather than estimating their frequency in students texts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Formiga/MG, open access, 2017
Keywords
Evolution, teaching, theory of evolution, teacher training, concepts, assessment
National Category
Natural Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33916 (URN)
Conference
XVII IOSTE SYMPOSIUM Science and Technology Education, Braga, July 11-16, 2016.
Available from: 2017-12-17 Created: 2017-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-18Bibliographically approved
Mattsson, J.-E. & Mutvei, A. (2016). Conceptual profiles for Doll’s four R's.. In: J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);(co-eds. O. Finlayson & R. Pinto (Ed.), Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 1. Paper presented at ESERA 2015, Helsinki, August 31-September 4, 2015. (pp. 72-77). Helsinki: University of Helsinki
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual profiles for Doll’s four R's.
2016 (English)In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 1 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);(co-eds. O. Finlayson & R. Pinto, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 72-77Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As academic organisers and teachers with different positions teacher training programs at Södertörn University we have had the opportunity to develop and assess different types of pedagogic activities and use, e.g., the 4 R´s proposed by Doll, recursion, relations, richness, and rigor in assessments. Here pre-service teacher student reflections assessed by use of the 4R’s are compared with other texts by the same students in order to assess the quality of their understanding of evolutionary theory. Written performances of biology students are also compared with those of pre-service teacher students in order to reveal differences in the use of scientific concepts between the groups. Analysis of student performances show a relation between the use of the 4R’s, and the use of scientific concepts. Analyses of texts by students in evolution theory show a relatively low use of scientific concepts often regarded as important in scientific text. This may be explained by students’ good skills in giving scientific explanations in every-day language. Teacher students used more biological and evolutionary concepts compared to biology students. The emphasis on the use of concepts, especially in school, may be exaggerated. Professional biologists have to communicate with people outside the scientific community but teachers often cares about a strict scientific language. This is also found here where teacher students use the concepts to a larger extent than biology students. School biology should focus on the basic processes of organic evolution as the foundation of all teaching in order to enhance the students’ deeper understanding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016
Keywords
biology, evolution, primary school, concepts
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31699 (URN)978-951-51-1541-6 (ISBN)
Conference
ESERA 2015, Helsinki, August 31-September 4, 2015.
Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mattsson, J.-E. & Mutvei, A. (2016). Forces, to visualise the invisible. In: Conference proceedings: 5th Conference edition, Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016. Paper presented at New perspectives in science education, 5th ed., Florence, Italy, March 17-18, 2016 (pp. 537-541). Fitenze: Libreria Universitaria
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forces, to visualise the invisible
2016 (English)In: Conference proceedings: 5th Conference edition, Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016, Fitenze: Libreria Universitaria, 2016, p. 537-541Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

“This is hard to understand as you can’t see the forces” exclaimed a student during a science course. Basic concepts in physics like force, energy, power are difficult to observe. Usually we often only make conclusions about their existence out of the resulting effects of their appearances. In addition, the use of similar words in other contexts, sometimes metaphorically, sometimes with other meaning, make the situation even worse. In science courses for pre-service primary school teacher students we have tried to design learning situations where students get personal experiences of the world behind the concepts described in words.

Thus, we designed situations when the students themselves were subjected to different forces or had the opportunity to observe the effects of forces. They wrote reflections on their experiences and we discussed these together in order to get used to how to describe and explain these type of experiences.

The learning outcome was assessed by analyses of written reflections of experiences from different attractions of an amusement park. One of the main outcomes of these reflections were the differences in the observations of the students. Often they had to do several rides to observe the forces they were subjected to. They also found differences in their personal ability to identify the forces. Some students were better in observing some of the forces than the others.

Thus, the participation in one activity with the aim of observing something does not necessarily lead to similar observations of other participants. Previous experiences seem to affect the observations so forces in some directions may be regarded as more powerful or easier to identify by some persons than others. This may be a general characteristic of observations in common situations. In that case this may be one explanation why, e.g., students have different focus in the classroom and learn other things than those intended by the teacher.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Fitenze: Libreria Universitaria, 2016
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31701 (URN)978-88-6292-705-5 (ISBN)
Conference
New perspectives in science education, 5th ed., Florence, Italy, March 17-18, 2016
Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mutvei, A., Lönn, M. & Mattsson, J.-E. (2016). Observation not only perception but also cognition. In: Conference proceedings: New perspectives in science education : 5th conference edition : Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016. Paper presented at New perspectives in science education, 5th ed, Florence,Italy, March 17-18, 2016. (pp. 365-369). Padova: Libreria Universitaria
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Observation not only perception but also cognition
2016 (English)In: Conference proceedings: New perspectives in science education : 5th conference edition : Florence, Italy, 17-18 March 2016, Padova: Libreria Universitaria, 2016, p. 365-369Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

According to the Swedish curriculum for primary school it is important in science subjects to develop skills to observe, to describe the observations and to put them into a theoretical framework already starting year 1–3.

Thus, it may be important for the teacher not only to be accustomed to the methods of observing but also to be an expert on using these observations in order to design teaching situations where these skills may be developed.

Here we present a study where 25 pre-service primary school teacher students at the beginning of a 20 weeks course established a relation to a study site focused on ecological questions. The task during the first week of that course was to observe and describe two habitats in the field and suggest what abiotic and biotic factors that had shaped the variation focussing at competition as an important ecological factor. In order to connect those ecological aspects with evolutionary aspects, specimen of the common species in the two habitats were collected and brought to the lab where the students constructed phenetic trees based on morphology but also on ecologically relevant properties like roots/no roots, expecting the set-up to awake evolutionary reflection. A main goal with this week was to give the students tools to investigate nature – to observe and describe patterns and to explain them by observing abiotic and biotic variation and evolutionary features and limitations.

Later during the course we created other, often not obviously similar, situations where the students had the opportunity to use the experiences of this first training week. We used open questions for reflections and examinations in order to get written material to assess the development of the skills.

We found notable personal development in most students and a greater awareness about the importance of personal cognitive activities in order to create better understanding and ability to use achieved knowledge in different situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Padova: Libreria Universitaria, 2016
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31702 (URN)978-88-6292-705-5 (ISBN)
Conference
New perspectives in science education, 5th ed, Florence,Italy, March 17-18, 2016.
Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mutvei, A. & Mattsson, J.-E. (2016). The use of conceptual profiles in performance assessments. In: J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);co-eds. J. Dolin & P. Kind (Ed.), Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference : Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 11. Paper presented at ESERA 2015, Helsinki, August 31-September 4, 2015. (pp. 1607-1618). Helsinki: University of Helsinki
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of conceptual profiles in performance assessments
2016 (English)In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference : Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 11 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.);co-eds. J. Dolin & P. Kind, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 1607-1618Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The curriculum for primary school in Sweden articulates the contextual dependence of concepts used in science. The students’ ability in different situations to use the knowledge achieved makes it important to understand differences in the meaning of words in different contexts in order to avoid conflicts between the intentions of the writer and the interpretation of the reader. The theory of conceptual profiles takes into account the variation in classrooms, which is common in Sweden, and promotes the teacher to achieve better communication. In the workshop the diversity of participants’ backgrounds made it possible to study the importance of mother tongue for conceptual understanding. Thus, the workshop was focused on two questions: 1) What influence does the mother tongue have on understanding and communicating science concepts? 2) Will these influences (if present) affect student communication and assessment? Learning by doing filled the major part of the workshop with opportunities for discussion, sharing ideas, and suggestions for further development. Participants were given assignments to assess students’ answers in biology, physics, and chemistry. Assessments were based on performance criteria of students’ use of concepts to describe processes in different contexts. Our results indicate that mother tongue is important for conceptual understanding while academic traditions seem to be important in assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016
Keywords
biology, chemistry, physics, concepts, primary school
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31700 (URN)978-951-51-1541-6 (ISBN)
Conference
ESERA 2015, Helsinki, August 31-September 4, 2015.
Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved
Ceken, F., Mutvei, A. & Mattsson, J.-E. (2016). The use of the theory of conceptual profiles to assess learning outcome. In: J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.); co-eds. P. Kariotoglou & T. Russell (Ed.), Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 16. Paper presented at ESERA 2015, Helsinki, August 31-September 4, 2015. (pp. 2716-2721). Helsinki: University of Helsinki
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of the theory of conceptual profiles to assess learning outcome
2016 (English)In: Electronic Proceedings of the ESERA 2015 Conference: Science education research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future, Part 16 / [ed] J. Lavonen, K. Juuti, J. Lampiselkä, A. Uitto & K. Hahl (Eds.); co-eds. P. Kariotoglou & T. Russell, Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016, p. 2716-2721Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The Swedish Schools Inspectorate (2012) made an evaluation of the quality in science teaching in year 1–3 in the Swedish compulsory school. Large differences were found among the 30 schools studied. Often teaching only consisted of mediating facts or experiments made by the teacher. The students rarely got an opportunity to learn through systematic investigations. Less than 60% of the lessons observed involved activities were the students to large extent met scientific methods. Also, good examples were found in schools were the teachers consciously let the students make hypotheses about what will happen in an experiment. In many schools the teacher use readymade teaching packages. Generally, they consist of instructions for how series of lessons with different themes may be planned and performed by using the material included. Some of the packages also include education of the teachers. According to the School Inspectorate teachers without education in science claim that with help of the packages they have been able to teach in all areas of school science. Teachers sometime use the packages as inspiration, but chose other methods for their teaching. The purpose of this study was to examine how students in primary school use concepts and to study their conceptual development during two sequences of lessons, primarily based on the student’s own documentations. Written diaries and reports of the students were analysed in order to construct their conceptual profiles and to follow their development. The assessment of the performances in relation to the knowledge requirement evaluated students ability to discuss simple questions concerning chemical processes, plan simple experiments and formulate simple question. The study shows that observations, discussions, and written documentation of simple experiments promotes conceptual development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2016
Keywords
science education, conception, conceptual development, documentation
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31698 (URN)978-951-51-1541-6 (ISBN)
Conference
ESERA 2015, Helsinki, August 31-September 4, 2015.
Available from: 2017-01-15 Created: 2017-01-15 Last updated: 2017-01-16Bibliographically approved
Mutvei, A. & Mattsson, J.-E. (2015). Big ideas in science education in teacher training program. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 167, 190-197
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Big ideas in science education in teacher training program
2015 (English)In: Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 1877-0428, E-ISSN 1877-0428, Vol. 167, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New curricula from primary school to higher education include performance assessments of achieved skills. The study investigates if it is possible to respond to this by focusing on some core ideas regarding content and design of learning situations. It was made on pre-service primary school teacher students in science and technology. It shows how the achievement of useable knowledge is enhanced by close relations between teachers and students in combination with open and visible processes of the learning.

Keywords
Science learning; teacher learning; student learning; Big Ideas; core concepts; qualitative assessment
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-25809 (URN)10.1016/j.sbspro.2014.12.661 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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