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Prevodnik, Andreas
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Jacobson, T., Prevodnik, A. & Sundelin, B. (2008). Combined effects of temperature and a pesticide on the Baltic amphipod Monoporeia affinis. Aquatic Biology, 1(3), 269-276
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combined effects of temperature and a pesticide on the Baltic amphipod Monoporeia affinis
2008 (English)In: Aquatic Biology, ISSN 1864-7782, E-ISSN 1864-7790, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 269-276Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effects of elevated temperature, in combination with exposure to the fungicide fenarimol, on reproduction in the deposit-feeding Baltic amphipod Monoporeia affinis were investigated. Previously, fenarimol was found to cause endocrine disruption in other crustacean species, via the ecdysteroid system. M. affinis were exposed to elevated temperature and/or fenarimol in soft-bottom microcosms during sexual maturation and mating. Elevated temperature and fenarimol (0.7 mg l(-1)) acted synergistically and increased the number of females with dead eggs, with a more than 4-fold incidence compared to exposure to one of the stressors (24 vs. < 5 %). Exposure to both stressors also resulted in a negative intrinsic rate of increase, which might indicate a population decline in the field. Elevated temperature impaired sexual maturation in males and females, lowered the number of fertilised females, reduced fecundity and altered embryogenesis. Exposure to fenarimol resulted in a 40 % decrease in ecdysteroid levels in sexually mature males and an increase in heat shock protein 60 expression. Ecdysteroid levels were not affected by temperature in either sex or stage of sexual maturation. Our results suggest that increase in the water temperature due to, e.g., global warming would impair reproduction and possibly increase the sensitivity of M affinis to toxicants.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-14184 (URN)10.3354/ab00028 (DOI)000259452300007 ()2-s2.0-73649128202 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-12-16 Created: 2011-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Lilja, K., Prevodnik, A., Gardeström, J., Elfwing, T., Tedengren, M. & Bollner, T. (2008). Regional differences in mRNA responses in blue mussels within the Baltic proper. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, 148(2), 101-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional differences in mRNA responses in blue mussels within the Baltic proper
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2008 (English)In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 148, no 2, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mussels (Mytilus sp.) from two regions along the permanent salinity gradient within the Baltic proper were exposed to copper (35 ppb) or petrol (0.3 mL/L) for 10 days and analyzed for mRNA expressions in gill tissue. Expression of mRNAs for the heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90 was significantly induced by copper, but not by petrol. For the metallothioneins MT10 and MT20, regional differences in mRNA expressions could be seen. In mussels from the northern Baltic proper, MT20 expression increased 2.8 and 3.4 times, after exposure to copper and petrol, respectively. In contrast, no change could be seen in MT20 expression for mussels from the southern Baltic proper. MT10 showed a peculiar expression not previously described. For some mussels, no expression at all was detected, some showed a weak expression and for some individuals a strong expression could be seen. For the mussels from the southern Baltic proper, the number of individuals with a strong expression of MT10 increased from 1 out of 18 (control), to 7 and 8, after exposure to copper and petrol, respectively. The results clearly show that responses vary between different regions within the Baltic proper, which emphasises the importance to study interactions between contaminants, populations and regions.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-5823 (URN)10.1016/j.cbpc.2008.04.001 (DOI)000257973400001 ()2-s2.0-45949098210 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Prevodnik, A., Lilja, K. & Bollner, T. (2007). Benzo[a]pyrene up-regulates the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and multixenobiotic resistance polyglycoprotein (P-gp) in Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, 145(2), 265-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Benzo[a]pyrene up-regulates the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and multixenobiotic resistance polyglycoprotein (P-gp) in Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.)
2007 (English)In: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part C: Toxicology & Pharmacology, ISSN 1532-0456, E-ISSN 1878-1659, Vol. 145, no 2, p. 265-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The expression of protein biomarkers in Baltic Sea blue mussels was analyzed after three days exposure to low (2.8 mu g/animal/day), intermediate (28 mu g/animal/day), or high (280 mu g/animal/day) nominal doses of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Significant expression changes were found in the animals exposed to the low dose, the lowest reported dose for DNA adduct formation in the gills of Baltic Sea blue mussels. Up-regulated expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), quantified from Western blots, and no change in the 5-bromo-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining pattern, determined by immunocytochemistry, indicated that the observed PCNA response was mainly non-proliferative, and thus possibly due to DNA damage. The expression of the multixenobiotic resistance polyglycoprotein (P-gp) was also up-regulated, proving its usefulness as an exposure marker to planar organic compounds. No effect of the BaP treatment with respect to the retinoblastoma 110 protein or heat shock proteins 60 and 70 was found. The variance in the medium and high dose data was too large to allow for the detection of significant expression changes. We suggest PCNA to be a marker for genotoxic stress derived from the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon BaP, irrespective of whether the stress leads to DNA repair or to cell proliferation.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-5825 (URN)10.1016/j.cbpc.2006.12.014 (DOI)000245499100012 ()17306628 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33847409768 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Prevodnik, A., Gardeström, J., Lilja, K., Elfwing, T., McDonagh, B., Petrovic, N., . . . Bollner, T. (2007). Oxidative stress in response to xenobiotics in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L.: evidence for variation along a natural. Aquatic Toxicology, 82(1), 63-71
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxidative stress in response to xenobiotics in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L.: evidence for variation along a natural
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2007 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) collected at three sampling sites in each of three geographical regions (South, Middle, North) along the permanent longitudinal South-North salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea, were exposed for 10 days to copper (35 ppb) or 95 octane petrol (0.3%0). During the experiment, they were maintained at the respective sampling site salinity. Scope for growth (SFG) was determined, and biochemical stress markers (protein carbonyl groups, disulfide bond formation, and glutathione transferase (GST), and catalase (CAT) activities) were investigated in gill tissue upon termination of the experiment. Treatment and regional effects for SFG and protein carbonyl groups were all significant for petrol. The largest increase in protein carbonyl groups was observed in the North. Mussels from the southern, more saline (similar to 7%) region had the highest SFG, and displayed the largest SFG decrease in response to treatment, indicating that they had the most energy available for allocation to stress response. They also displayed the least increase in the level of protein carbonyl groups. Mussels from the Northern, less saline (similar to 5%) region had the highest degree of protein carbonyl groups in response to both treatments, and lowest average SFG. Silver stained diagonal gels for samples from one sampling site in South and North, respectively, demonstrated differences in disulfide bond profiles for both stress treatments. There was also a regional difference in the number of protein disulfides observed on diagonal gels. The most diverse protein disulfide response was found in South. No treatment related effects on GST and CAT activities were observed. We suggest that both SFG and protein carbonyl groups show that geographical difference in stress susceptibility, previously established between the North and the Baltic Seas, also apply on a regional scale within the Baltic Sea, along the salinity gradient.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-5824 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2007.01.006 (DOI)000246231100007 ()17320983 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-33947322375 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Prevodnik, A. (2007). The use of protein biomarkers in ecotoxicology: Studies of oxidative and genotoxic stress in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of protein biomarkers in ecotoxicology: Studies of oxidative and genotoxic stress in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)
2007 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Many environmental pollutants, heavy metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) among them, are toxic by oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be defined as a state in an organism when its inherent capacity to handle oxyradicals is surpassed, and it may result in peroxidation of lipids, and damage to proteins and DNA. Thus, genotoxic stress may follow oxidative stress.

Little is known about the effects of genotoxic stress in invertebrates, although the occurrence of tumors has been known for quite some time, in bivalve mollusks at least since the 1960s. Less dramatic manifestations of genotoxic stress may include impaired enzyme functions, altered protein turnover, with possible effects on physiological processes. Keys to a better understanding of genotoxic stress are the proteins involved in the regulation of the cell-cycle and DNA repair. Virtually nothing is known about these proteins in mussels. The work presented in the papers I, II, and IV aimed to give a first insight into how the blue mussel responds to genotoxic stress following exposure to the polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), PAHs in petrochemical pollution, copper (Cu) or cadmium (Cd), all substances known to enhance formation of oxyradicals. PAHs may also be genotoxic by formation of DNA adducts. The cell-cycle and DNA repair proteins studied were the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the retinoblastoma protein 110 (Rb110). The first is involved in DNA repair and cell proliferation; the second at the G1 checkpoint of the cell-cycle. We showed that the PCNA is a potential marker of genotoxic response (DNA repair, and/or cell proliferation) to PAHs (papers I and IV) and cadmium (paper II). Furthermore, cadmium may possibly elicit a cell-cycle stop mediated by the Rb110 (the paper II). Based on these cell-cycle and DNA repair proteins, the genotoxic responses in blue mussels seem to be similar to that in vertebrates.

Markers of general stress or oxidative stress were used in all studies. The applicability of the general stress marker heat shock proteins (HSP70 and HSP60) (papers I and IV), the polyglycoprotein (P-gp) (paper I), a marker of exposure to planar organic compounds, and markers of oxidative stress, such as the antioxidant defense enzyme copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) (paper II), and the oxidative protein modifications protein carbonyls and disulfides (papers III and IV) were tested in various situations. In accordance with results by others, my studies have shown that HSPs, which formerly were considered as universal stress markers, are not always applicable, as their expression is affected by factors that are difficult to control (papers I). I found that the P-gp can be used as a marker of B[a]P exposure in Baltic Sea blue mussels (paper I). In paper II, I reported that the Cu/Zn-SOD was up-regulated in response to Cd exposure, a clear indication of oxidative stress that was also manifested as a response in the studied cell-cycle and DNA repair proteins. Protein carbonyls were successfully used in the papers III and IV to indicate oxidative stress. In paper III, I also investigated the potential of diagonal gels as a tool for identification of protein disulfides in protein expression signatures (PESs). The diagonal gels hold a good potential for identification of novel and prime targets of oxidative stress.

My work was performed as short-term laboratory studies, in vivo, in blue mussels from the Baltic Sea, and as a one year long field experiment with Icelandic blue mussels in a tidal system. The idea was to use blue mussels that were already physiologically challenged (by osmotic stress, or alternating aerobic and anaerobic metabolism), to see how they responded to additional stress in the form of toxicants capable of inducing oxidative and genotoxic stress. Most of the work on biochemical endpoints in blue mussels published so far was done on blue mussels from fully marine environments, and without consideration to the effect of tide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2007. p. 48
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31466 (URN)91-7155-402-5 (ISBN)
Public defence
2007-04-20, Magnélisalen, Kemiska övningslaboratoriet, Svante Arrhenius väg 12 A, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
Prevodnik, A., Lilja, K. & Bollner, T. (2006). Effects of copper and cadmium on protein expression in Baltic sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis sp.). Marine Environmental Research, 62, S90-S91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of copper and cadmium on protein expression in Baltic sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis sp.)
2006 (English)In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 62, p. S90-S91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-5826 (URN)doi:10.1016/j.marenvres.2006.04.036 (DOI)000238957800073 ()
Available from: 2011-01-31 Created: 2011-01-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Prevodnik, A., Lilja, K. & Bollner, T.Protein biomarker response in Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) exposed to copper or cadmium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein biomarker response in Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) exposed to copper or cadmium
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31467 (URN)
Note

Som manuskript i avhandling. As manuscript in dissertation.,

Available from: 2007-03-29 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
Prevodnik, A., Skarphéðinsdóttir, H., Ericson, G. & Bollner, T.Tidal impact on pollutant stress responses in Icelandic blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tidal impact on pollutant stress responses in Icelandic blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.)
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31468 (URN)
Note

Som manuskript i avhandling. As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2007-03-29 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2016-12-20Bibliographically approved
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