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Larsson, J., Smolarz, K., Świeżak, J., Turower, M., Czerniawska, N. & Grahn, M. (2018). Multi biomarker analysis of pollution effect on resident populations of blue mussels from the Baltic Sea. Aquatic Toxicology, 198, 240-256
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi biomarker analysis of pollution effect on resident populations of blue mussels from the Baltic Sea
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2018 (English)In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 198, p. 240-256Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic pollution including metals, petroleum, toxins, nutrients and many others is a growing problem in the marine environment. These are important factors altering the environment and by that the fate of many local populations of marine organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of selected point pollution sources on resident populations of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis trossulus) in the Baltic Sea using multiple biomarker approach. The study used a nested sampling scheme in which sites from reference (REF) habitats are geographically paired with selected sites from sewage treatment plants (STP) and harbors (HAR). The results showed that mussels from harbors had a higher frequency of histological abnormalities in the digestive gland compared to mussels from sewage effluent affected areas and reference sites. However these mussels together with mussels from STPs had higher lipid content, body mass index (BMI) and gonado-somatic index (GSI) compared to mussels from reference sites. A marked spatial variability was found with a stronger toxicity of ambient environment affecting resident mussel populations in the Gulf of Gdańsk area, while an opposite pattern was found in Tvärminne area. Yet the blue mussels sampled in the Gulf of Gdańsk were characterized by the highest GSI and BMI values compared to Askö and Tvärminne populations. No differences in analyzed biomarker response related to species identity, measured by a species-specific genetic marker, were found indicative of strong genetic introgression in the Baltic Proper.

Keywords
Baltic Sea; blue mussel; pollution; physiology; histopathological lesions
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33701 (URN)10.1016/j.aquatox.2018.02.024 (DOI)000430630100025 ()29558709 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044104103 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A063-10
Note

As manuscript in dissertation.

Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2018-05-16Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, M., Liedvogel, M., Larson, K., Sigeman, H., Grahn, M., Wright, A. P., . . . Bensch, S. (2017). Genetic differences between willow warbler migratory phenotypes are few and cluster in large haplotype blocks [Letter to the editor]. Evolution Letters, 1(3), 155-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic differences between willow warbler migratory phenotypes are few and cluster in large haplotype blocks
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2017 (English)In: Evolution Letters, ISSN 2056-3744, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 155-168Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well established that differences in migratory behavior between populations of songbirds have a genetic basis but the actual genes underlying these traits remains largely unknown. In an attempt to identify such candidate genes we de novo assembled the genome of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus, and used whole-genome resequencing and a SNP array to associate genomic variation with migratory phenotypes across two migratory divides around the Baltic Sea that separate SW migrating P. t. trochilus wintering in western Africa and SSE migrating P. t. acredula wintering in eastern and southern Africa. We found that the genomes of the two migratory phenotypes lack clear differences except for three highly differentiated regions located on chromosomes 1, 3, and 5 (containing 146, 135, and 53 genes, respectively). Within each migratory phenotype we found virtually no differences in allele frequencies for thousands of SNPs, even when comparing geographically distant populations breeding in Scandinavia and Far East Russia (>6000 km). In each of the three differentiated regions, multidimensional scaling-based clustering of SNP genotypes from more than 1100 individuals demonstrates the presence of distinct haplotype clusters that are associated with each migratory phenotype. In turn, this suggests that recombination is absent or rare between haplotypes, which could be explained by inversion polymorphisms. Whereas SNP alleles on chromosome 3 correlate with breeding altitude and latitude, the allele distribution within the regions on chromosomes 1 and 5 perfectly matches the geographical distribution of the migratory phenotypes. The most differentiated 10 kb windows and missense mutations within these differentiated regions are associated with genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, possibly representing physiological adaptations to the different migratory strategies. The ∼200 genes in these regions, of which several lack described function, will direct future experimental and comparative studies in the search for genes that underlie important migratory traits.

Keywords
Divergent chromosome region, local adaptation, migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34253 (URN)10.1002/evl3.15 (DOI)000449440100004 ()
Projects
Molecular mechanisms for recent acquisition of alternative winter-migration behavior in songbirds of the Baltic Sea Region
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A067-08
Available from: 2018-01-17 Created: 2018-01-17 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Lind, E. E., Corell, H., Grahn, M., Smolarz, K. & Lönn, M. (2017). Regional genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea area. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 98-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regional genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea area
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2017 (English)In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, p. 98-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Connectivity plays an important role in shaping the genetic structure and in evolution of local adaptation. In the marine environment barriers to gene flow are in most cases caused by gradients in environmental factors, ocean circulation and/or larval behavior. Despite the long pelagic larval stages, with high potential for dispersal many marine organisms have been shown to have a fine scale genetic structuring. In this study, by using a combination of high-resolution genetic markers, species hybridization data and biophysical modeling we can present a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary landscape for a keystone species in the Baltic Sea, the blue mussel. We identified distinct genetic differentiation between the West Coast, Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea regions, with lower gene diversity in the Bothnian Sea. Oceanographic connectivity together with salinity and to some extent species identity provides explanations for the genetic differentiation between the West Coast and the Baltic Sea (Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea). The genetic differentiation between the Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea cannot be directly explained by oceanographic connectivity, species identity or salinity, while the lower connectivity to the Bothnian Sea may explain the lower gene diversity. © 2016.

Keywords
AFLP, Baltic Sea, Barrier, Gene flow, Oceanographic connectivity, Population genetics
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30647 (URN)10.1016/j.ecss.2016.06.016 (DOI)000408787800012 ()2-s2.0-84977120681 (Scopus ID)1328/42/2010 (Local ID)1328/42/2010 (Archive number)1328/42/2010 (OAI)
Projects
Evolutionary adaptation to environmental disturbance in marine ecosystems: genetic ecotoxicology in the Baltic Sea
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A063-10
Available from: 2016-07-20 Created: 2016-07-19 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Boss, J., Liedvogel, M., Lundberg, M., Olsson, P., Reischke, N., Naurin, S., . . . Bensch, S. (2016). Gene expression in the brain of a migratory songbird during breeding and migration. Movement Ecology, 4, Article ID 4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene expression in the brain of a migratory songbird during breeding and migration
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2016 (English)In: Movement Ecology, E-ISSN 2051-3933, Vol. 4, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: We still have limited knowledge about the underlying genetic mechanisms that enable migrating species of birds to navigate the globe. Here we make an attempt to get insight into the genetic architecture controlling this complex innate behaviour. We contrast the gene expression profiles of two closely related songbird subspecies with divergent migratory phenotypes. In addition to comparing differences in migratory strategy we include a temporal component and contrast patterns between breeding adults and autumn migrating juvenile birds of both subspecies. The two willow warbler subspecies, Phylloscopus trochilus trochilus and P. t. acredula, are remarkably similar both in phenotype and genotype and have a narrow contact zone in central Scandinavia. Here we used a microarray gene chip representing 23,136 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata to identify mRNA level differences in willow warbler brain tissue in relation to subspecies and season.

RESULTS: Out of the 22,109 EST probe sets that remained after filtering poorly binding probes, we found 11,898 (51.8 %) probe sets that could be reliably and uniquely matched to a total of 6,758 orthologous zebra finch genes. The two subspecies showed very similar levels of gene expression with less than 0.1 % of the probe sets being significantly differentially expressed. In contrast, 3,045 (13.8 %) probe sets were found to be differently regulated between samples collected from breeding adults and autumn migrating juvenile birds. The genes found to be differentially expressed between seasons appeared to be enriched for functional roles in neuronal firing and neuronal synapse formation.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that only few genes are differentially expressed between the subspecies. This suggests that the different migration strategies of the subspecies might be governed by few genes, or that the expression patterns of those genes are time-structured or tissue-specific in ways, which our approach fails to uncover. Our findings will be useful in the planning of new experiments designed to unravel the genes involved in the migratory program of birds.

Keywords
Behavior; Birds; Calcium transport; Gene expression; Microarray; Migration; Phylloscopus trochilus; Synapse
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Environmental Studies; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29549 (URN)10.1186/s40462-016-0069-6 (DOI)000381931600001 ()26881054 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85020070286 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A067-08
Available from: 2016-02-18 Created: 2016-02-18 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved
Hamilton, P. B., Cowx, I. G., Oleksiak, M. F., Griffiths, A. M., Grahn, M., Stevens, J. R., . . . Tyler, C. R. (2016). Population-level consequences for wild fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of chemicals: a critical review. Fish and Fisheries, 17(3), 545-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Population-level consequences for wild fish exposed to sublethal concentrations of chemicals: a critical review
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2016 (English)In: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 545-566Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concentrated chemical spills have been shown to impact adversely on fish populations and even cause localized population extinctions. Evaluating population-level impacts of sublethal exposure concentrations is, however, complex and confounded by other environmental pressures. Applying effect measures derived from laboratory-based chemical exposures to impacts in wild fish populations is constrained by uncertainty on how biochemical response measures (biomarkers) translate into health outcomes, lack of available data for chronic exposures and the many uncertainties in available fish population models. Furthermore, wild fish show phenotypic plasticity and local adaptations can occur that adds geographic and temporal variance on responses. Such population-level factors are rarely considered in the chemical risk assessment process and can probably be derived only from studies on wild fish. Molecular technologies, including microsatellite and SNP genotyping, and RNASeq for gene expression studies, are advancing our understanding of mechanisms of eco-toxicological response, tolerance, adaptation and selection in wild populations. We examine critically the application of such approaches with examples including using microsatellites that has identified roach (Rutilus rutilus) populations living in rivers contaminated with sewage effluents that are self-sustaining, and studies of stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) that have identified genomic regions under selection putatively related to pollution tolerance. Integrating data on biological effects between laboratory-based studies and wild populations, and building understanding on adaptive responses to sublethal exposure are some of the priority research areas for more effective evaluation of population risks and resilience to contaminant exposure.

Keywords
Adaptation, DNA microsatellite, Fish, Pollutants, Populations, Selection
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28191 (URN)10.1111/faf.12125 (DOI)000382494600001 ()2-s2.0-84939218700 (Scopus ID)
Funder
NERC - the Natural Environment Research Council, NE/G019355/1
Available from: 2015-09-17 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Larsson, J., Lönn, M., Lind, E. E., Świeżak, J., Smolarz, K. & Grahn, M. (2016). Sewage treatment plant associated genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea and Swedish west coast. PeerJ, 4, Article ID e2628.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sewage treatment plant associated genetic differentiation in the blue mussel from the Baltic Sea and Swedish west coast
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2016 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 4, article id e2628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human-derived environmental pollutants and nutrients that reach the aquatic environment through sewage effluents, agricultural and industrial processes are constantly contributing to environmental changes that serve as drivers for adaptive responses and evolutionary changes in many taxa. In this study, we examined how two types of point sources of aquatic environmental pollution, harbors and sewage treatment plants, affect gene diversity and genetic differentiation in the blue mussel in the Baltic Sea area and off the Swedish west coast (Skagerrak). Reference sites (REF) were geographically paired with sites from sewage treatments plant (STP) and harbors (HAR) with a nested sampling scheme, and genetic differentiation was evaluated using a high-resolution marker amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). This study showed that genetic composition in the Baltic Sea blue mussel was associated with exposure to sewage treatment plant effluents. In addition, mussel populations from harbors were genetically divergent, in contrast to the sewage treatment plant populations, suggesting that there is an effect of pollution from harbors but that the direction is divergent and site specific, while the pollution effect from sewage treatment plants on the genetic composition of blue mussel populations acts in the same direction in the investigated sites.

National Category
Biological Sciences Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31135 (URN)10.7717/peerj.2628 (DOI)000387168200015 ()27812424 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84994409132 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A063-10
Available from: 2016-11-11 Created: 2016-11-11 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, M., Boss, J., Canbäck, B., Liedvogel, M., Larson, K. W., Grahn, M., . . . Wright, A. P. (2013). Characterisation of a transcriptome to find sequence differences between two differentially migrating subspecies of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus.. BMC Genomics, 14, Article ID 330.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterisation of a transcriptome to find sequence differences between two differentially migrating subspecies of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus.
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2013 (English)In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, E-ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 14, article id 330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Animal migration requires adaptations in morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. Several of these traits have been shown to possess a strong heritable component in birds, but little is known about their genetic architecture. Here we used 454 sequencing of brain-derived transcriptomes from two differentially migrating subspecies of the willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus to detect genes potentially underlying traits associated with migration.

RESULTS: The transcriptome sequencing resulted in 1.8 million reads following filtering steps. Most of the reads (84%) were successfully mapped to the genome of the zebra finch Taeniopygia gutatta. The mapped reads were situated within at least 12,101 predicted zebra finch genes, with the greatest sequencing depth in exons. Reads that were mapped to intergenic regions were generally located close to predicted genes and possibly located in uncharacterized untranslated regions (UTRs). Out of 85,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with a minimum sequencing depth of eight reads from each of two subspecies-specific pools, only 55 showed high differentiation, confirming previous studies showing that most of the genetic variation is shared between the subspecies. Validation of a subset of the most highly differentiated SNPs using Sanger sequencing demonstrated that several of them also were differentiated between an independent set of individuals of each subspecies. These SNPs were clustered in two chromosome regions that are likely to be influenced by divergent selection between the subspecies and that could potentially be associated with adaptations to their different migratory strategies.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing analysis aiming at detecting genes underlying migratory phenotypes in birds and provides new candidates for genes potentially involved in migration.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-18923 (URN)10.1186/1471-2164-14-330 (DOI)000319226500002 ()23672489 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84877605906 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Molecular mechanisms for recent acquisition of alternative winter-migration behavior in songbirds of the Baltic Sea Region
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A067-08Swedish Research Council, 349-2007-8690
Available from: 2013-05-23 Created: 2013-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, O., Mwandya, A., Gullström, M., Thorberg, M. & Grahn, M. (2012). Genetic Identification and Population Structure of Juvenile Mullet (Mugilidae) Collected for Aquaculture in East Africa. Western Indian Ocean journal of marine science, 11(1), 41-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic Identification and Population Structure of Juvenile Mullet (Mugilidae) Collected for Aquaculture in East Africa
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2012 (English)In: Western Indian Ocean journal of marine science, ISSN 0856-860X, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 41-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a growing demand for wild caught juvenile fish to supply the market for aquaculture. However, little is known about the genetic effects of juvenile collection from wild populations. There are a number of imminent threats to both aquaculture systems and wild fish populations. Juvenile collection from a single population can for example reduce population’s evolutionary potential as well as the disease resistance within an aquaculture pond. In this study, we investigated the local genetic structure of juvenile mullets collected from five sites around Bagamoyo (Tanzanian mainland) and Zanzibar Island, East Africa. Fish were caught in low tide using a seine net. The fish were morphologically identified, and then genetically identified using direct sequencing of the CO1 gene with cross referencing with the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) systems.  Molecular variance analyses were used to infer genetic subdivision based on geographic sampling site as well as inferring population structure through the Bayesian assignment test implemented in STRUCTURE 2.3. Our results showed that samples morphologically identified as Mugil cephalus where in fact Valamugil buchanani and we also found evidence of an introgression genome event, where the gene flow from one species may have affected the general gene pool. The Bayesian analysis revealed a clear genetic population structure among the sampled fish; the main difference was the presence of a unique mainland cluster. Our findings may have important implications for management and conservation of mullet fishes in the region and elsewhere.

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-18924 (URN)
Projects
GENETIC CONNECTIVITY OF FISH POPULATIONS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND DESIGN OF EFFECTIVE MARINE PROTECTED AREAS
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SWE-2005-321
Available from: 2013-05-23 Created: 2013-05-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Lind, E. E. & Grahn, M. (2011). Directional genetic selection by pulp mill effluent on multiple natural populations of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Ecotoxicology, 20, 503-512
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Directional genetic selection by pulp mill effluent on multiple natural populations of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)
2011 (English)In: Ecotoxicology, ISSN 0963-9292, E-ISSN 1573-3017, Vol. 20, p. 503-512Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Contamination can cause a rapid environmental change which may require populations to respond with evolutionary changes. To evaluate the effects of pulp mill effluents on population genetics, we sampled three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) near four pulp mills and four adjacent reference sites and analyzed Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) to compare genetic variability. A fine scale genetic structure was detected and samples from polluted sites separated from reference sites in multidimensional scaling plots (P < 0.005, 1000 permutations) and locus-by-locus Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) further confirmed that habitats are significantly separated (F(ST) = 0.021, P < 0.01, 1023 permutations). The amount of genetic variation between populations did not differ between habitats, and populations from both habitats had similar levels of heterozygosity (polluted sites Nei's Hs = 0.11, reference sites Nei's Hs = 0.11). Still, pairwise F(ST): s between three, out of four, pairs of polluted-reference sites were significant. A F(ST)-outlier analysis showed that 21 (8.4%) loci were statistically different from a neutral distribution at the P < 0.05 level and therefore indicated to be under divergent selection. When removing 13 F(ST)-outlier loci, significant at the P < 0.01 level, differentiation between habitats disappeared in a multidimensional scaling plot. In conclusion, pulp mill effluence has acted as a selective agent on natural populations of G. aculeatus, causing a convergence in genotype composition change at multiple sites in an open environment.

National Category
Ecology Genetics
Research subject
Environmental Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-7666 (URN)10.1007/s10646-011-0639-8 (DOI)000289848600003 ()21455608 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79955829367 (Scopus ID)1328/42/2010 (Local ID)1328/42/2010 (Archive number)1328/42/2010 (OAI)
Projects
Evolutionary adaptation to environmental disturbance in marine ecosystems: genetic ecotoxicology in the Baltic Sea
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, A063-10
Available from: 2011-05-05 Created: 2011-04-04 Last updated: 2017-07-17Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, J., Grahn, M. & Wright, A. P. (2011). Proteome-wide evidence for enhanced positive Darwinian selection within intrinsically disordered regions in proteins. Genome Biology, 12(7), R65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteome-wide evidence for enhanced positive Darwinian selection within intrinsically disordered regions in proteins
2011 (English)In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1474-760X, Vol. 12, no 7, p. R65-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Understanding the adaptive changes that alter the function of proteins during evolution is an important question for biology and medicine. The increasing number of completely sequenced genomes from closely related organisms, as well as individuals within species, facilitates systematic detection of recent selection events by means of comparative genomics. RESULTS: We have used genome-wide strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphism data from 64 strains of budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Saccharomyces paradoxus) to determine whether adaptive positive selection is correlated with protein regions showing propensity for different classes of structure conformation. Data from phylogenetic and population genetic analysis of 3746 gene alignments consistently shows a significantly higher degree of positive Darwinian selection in intrinsically disordered regions of proteins compared to regions of alpha helix, beta sheet or tertiary structure. Evidence of positive selection is significantly enriched in classes of proteins whose functions and molecular mechanisms can be coupled to adaptive processes and these classes tend to have a higher average content of intrinsically unstructured protein regions. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that intrinsically disordered protein regions may be important for the production and maintenance of genetic variation with adaptive potential and that they may thus be of central significance for the evolvability of the organism or cell in which they occur.

National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-9985 (URN)10.1186/gb-2011-12-7-r65 (DOI)000296648400004 ()21771306 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-79960555958 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2011-09-05 Created: 2011-07-27 Last updated: 2017-07-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Endocrine disruption in fish: Risk identification, development of biomarkers and assessment of risk levels in the Baltic Sea [A037-2008_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityMolecular mechanisms for recent acquisition of alternative winter-migration behavior in songbirds of the Baltic Sea Region [A067-2008_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityEvolutionary adaptation to environmental disturbance in marine ecosystems: genetic ecotoxicology in the Baltic Sea [A063-2010_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityEndocrine disruption in fish: Effects on behaviour and reproduction, development af biomarkers and assessment of risk levels in the Baltic Sea [A065-2011_OSS]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3389-4162

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