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Sundén, Jenny, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6047-4369
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Sundén, J. & Blagojevic, J. (2019). Dis/connections: Toward an Ontology of Broken Relationality. Configurations (Baltimore, Md.), 27(1), 37-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dis/connections: Toward an Ontology of Broken Relationality
2019 (English)In: Configurations (Baltimore, Md.), ISSN 1063-1801, E-ISSN 1080-6520, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 37-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ideas of relationality have come to influence a wide range of theoretical fields. In this article, we develop an understanding of relationality as not necessarily something continuous and uninterrupted (as is often the case), but rather as something fundamentally shaped through breaks and interruptions. We work through notions of relational brokenness by "thinking with" the telephone as an intriguing relational technology, a material metaphor, and a discursive device. The argument moves between Derrida's telephone fascination; the metaphorical black telephone in Sylvia Plath's poem "Daddy"; Proust's narrator waiting for a call from his grandmother in "The Guermantes Way"; and the communication breakdown in Lady Gaga's "Telephone." What the telephone allows for in this discussion is a way of thinking of not only technology as inherently fractured, but also our very ways of relating, connecting, and being in the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Johns Hopkins University Press, 2019
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37535 (URN)10.1353/con.2019.0001 (DOI)000455855800002 ()2-s2.0-85060895466 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2020-03-27Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. & Paasonen, S. (2019). Inappropriate Laughter: Affective Homophily and the Unlikely Comedy of #MeToo. Social Media + Society, 5(4)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inappropriate Laughter: Affective Homophily and the Unlikely Comedy of #MeToo
2019 (English)In: Social Media + Society, ISSN 2056-3051, E-ISSN 2056-3051, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates the affective and ambiguous dynamics of feminist humor as an unexpected strategy of resistance in connection with #MeToo, asking what laughter may do to the sharpness of negative affect of shame and anger driving the movement. Our inquiry comes in three vignettes. First, we deploy Nanette—Hannah Gadsby’s 2018 Netflix success heralded as the comedy of the #MeToo era—arguing that the uniform viral warmth surrounding the show drives the emergence of networked feminisms through “affective homophily,” or a love of feeling the same. With Nanette, the contagious qualities of laughter are tamed by a networked logic of homophily, allowing for intensity while resisting dissent. Our second vignette zooms in on a less known feminist comedian, Lauren Maul, and her online #MeToo musical comedy riffing off on apologies made by male celebrities accused of sexual harassment, rendering the apologies and the men performing them objects of ridicule. Our third example opens up the door to the ambivalence of irony. In considering the unexpected pockets of humor within the #MeToo scandal that ripped apart the prestigious institution of the Swedish Academy, we explore the emergence of carnivalesque comedy and feminist uses of irony in the appropriation of the pussy-bow blouse as an ambiguous feminist symbol. Our examples allow us to argue for the political importance of affective ambiguity, difference, and dissent in contemporary social media feminisms, and to highlight the risk when a movement like #MeToo closes ranks around homogeneous feelings of not only shame and rage, but also love. © The Author(s) 2019.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
#MeToo, affective homophily, feminist humor, laughter, seriousness
National Category
Gender Studies Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39691 (URN)10.1177/2056305119883425 (DOI)000503241000001 ()2-s2.0-85076002190 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-07Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. (2019). Vibrator nation: how feminist sex-toy stores changed the business of pleasure: Lynn Comella, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017, 278 pp. [Review]. Journal of Gender Studies, 28(8), 980-981
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vibrator nation: how feminist sex-toy stores changed the business of pleasure: Lynn Comella, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017, 278 pp.
2019 (English)In: Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 0958-9236, E-ISSN 1465-3869, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 980-981Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-39160 (URN)10.1080/09589236.2019.1664815 (DOI)000486011000001 ()
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-11-05Bibliographically approved
Dahl, U. & Sundén, J. (2018). Femininity Revisited: Refiguring Critical Femininity Studies introduction. Guest editors' introduction. The European Journal of Women's Studies, 25(3), 269-277
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Femininity Revisited: Refiguring Critical Femininity Studies introduction. Guest editors' introduction
2018 (English)In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 269-277Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36136 (URN)10.1177/1350506818774742 (DOI)000440685600001 ()2-s2.0-85046751446 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2020-03-24Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. (2018). Queer disconnections: Affect, break, and delay in digital connectivity. Transformations (31)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Queer disconnections: Affect, break, and delay in digital connectivity
2018 (English)In: Transformations, ISSN 1444-3775, E-ISSN 1444-3775, no 31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article, I theorise the intricate relation between technology and affect by considering questions of digital vulnerability – of disconnections, breaks, and delays – as a way of rethinking our affective attachments to digital devices. By extension, I also connect this argument with a framework of queer theory, as an opportunity to think differently about relations through questions of technological ruptures and deferrals. My bassline for this endeavour is the idea of the break as formative for how we can both sense and make sense of digital connectivity, in so far as the break has the potential to bring forth what constant connectivity means, and how it feels. Similarly, the break can potentially make tangible relational norms around continuous, coherent, and linear ways of relating and connecting, and thus provide alternative models for ways of being with digital devices, networks, and each other. If constant connectivity provides us with a relational norm of sorts, then disconnection could function as a queer orientation device with the potential of creating openings for other ways of coming together, and other ways of staying together.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Central Queensland University, 2018
Keywords
affect theory; digital connectivity; disconnection; Spinoza, queer relationality
National Category
Media Studies Gender Studies
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-37458 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-28 Created: 2019-01-28 Last updated: 2020-03-23Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. & Paasonen, S. (2018). Shameless hags and tolerance whores: feminist resistance and the affective circuits of online hate. Feminist Media Studies, 18(4), 643-656
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shameless hags and tolerance whores: feminist resistance and the affective circuits of online hate
2018 (English)In: Feminist Media Studies, ISSN 1468-0777, E-ISSN 1471-5902, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 643-656Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores shamelessness as a feminist tactic of resistance to online misogyny, hate and shaming within a Nordic context. In our Swedish examples, this involves affective reclaiming of the term “hagga” (hag), which has come to embody shameless femininity and feminist solidarity, as well as the Facebook event “Skamlös utsläckning” (shameless extinction), which extends the solidarity or the hag to a collective of non-men. Our Finnish examples revolve around appropriating derisive terms used of women defending multiculturalism and countering the current rise of nationalist anti-immigration policy and activism across Web platforms, such as “kukkahattutäti” (aunt with a flower hat) and “suvakkihuora” (“overtly tolerant whore”). Drawing on Facebook posts, blogs and discussion forums, the article conceptualizes the affective dynamics and intersectional nature of online hate against women and other others. More specifically, we examine the dynamics of shaming and the possibilities of shamelessness as a feminist tactic of resistance. Since online humor often targets women, racial others and queers, the models of resistance that this article uncovers add a new stitch to its memetic logics. We propose that a networked politics of reclaiming is taking shape, one using collective imagination and wit to refuel feminist communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Keywords
Affect, digital media, feminist resistance, reclaiming, online hate, shamelessness, shaming
National Category
Gender Studies Media Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34838 (URN)10.1080/14680777.2018.1447427 (DOI)000438157700009 ()2-s2.0-85044277198 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-04-12 Created: 2018-04-12 Last updated: 2020-03-30Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. (2016). Glitch, genus, tillfälligt avbrott: Femininitet som trasighetens teknologi. Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet (1-2), 23-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glitch, genus, tillfälligt avbrott: Femininitet som trasighetens teknologi
2016 (Swedish)In: Lambda Nordica: Tidskrift om homosexualitet, ISSN 1100-2573, no 1-2, p. 23-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Technologies always implicate their own failures, breakdowns, and glitches. The purpose of this article is to develop an understanding of gender in general – and femininity in particular – as something fundamentally technological, and, as such, broken. Drawing on the technological undercurrent in current posthumanist feminist theory, arguing for a re-introduction of technologies in the midst of feminist posthumanist critique, the author puts into play a vocabulary of malfunctioning, broken, vulnerable technologies of gender. In particular, the term “glitch” is put to use to account for machinic failures in gender within the digital domain. By using glitch as a way of theorizing gender, the article is a dual contribution to digital media studies and feminist theory in a technological vein. Glitch is the spinning wheel on the computer screen, the delay between a command given and its execution. Etymologically, glitch (possibly) derives from the Yiddish word glitsh, meaning a “slippery place” or “a slip.” Glitch signals the slipperiness of something or someone off balance and a loss of control. It usually refers to a sudden unexpected event, a surge of current or an illegitimate signal that breaks the flow of energy, information, and affect. Glitch is, fundamentally, a struggle with binary code. Gender is a similar struggle to cope with binaries, with a loss of binaries, and about what happens when the vulnerability of the system is revealed. On this side of glitch, the tendency is toward hesitation and anticipation, irritation and annoyance, as well as pain and anxiety in the face of technologies and bodies that skip, crash, or get stuck. The default mode of gender is technological failure, and cis-gender normativity – what the author calls gender “high fidelity” – an unobtainable ideal of impossible perfection. If to glitch is to slip, to stutter, to stumble, gender high fidelity is to slip by unnoticed. In contrast to the notion of cis-gender normativity as a desire to cover or remove “noise,” to clear the channel, glitch is that which infiltrate, make dirty, and ultimately put pressure on the norms and ideals that structure gender as pure, clear, cold, binary code. In this sense, glitch is also about a perceived beauty in crashing and skipping, holding an intriguing critical, aesthetic, activist potential. In the hands of glitch artists, circuit breakers, and gamers, but also queers, and trans-performers, glitch becomes a celebration of the beauty of malfunction and gender-technological fragility.

Keywords
brokenness, digital media technologies, femininity, gender, glitch, posthumanist feminist theory, somatechnics
National Category
Gender Studies Media Studies Cultural Studies
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31227 (URN)
Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. (2015). Clockwork Corsets: Pressed Against the Past. International journal of cultural studies, 18(3), 379-383
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clockwork Corsets: Pressed Against the Past
2015 (English)In: International journal of cultural studies, ISSN 1367-8779, E-ISSN 1460-356X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 379-383Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For a feminist scholar of technology, contemporary steampunk cultures incorporate several interesting elements. They embrace playful ways of relating to technology. They contain thrifty Do-It-Yourself strategies and ethics of recycling, linking the crafting of sexually specific bodies to imaginative time-play. They involve an intermingling of technological extensions with modes of embodiment and costuming. The corset is an emblematic Victorian, industrial technology in steampunk costuming, altering bodies and affects as well as aesthetics and politics. But how far can white, Victorian, middle-class, imperialist, corseted femininity be ‘punked’, twisted, modified, or transformed? And how much do these transpositions in and through time get caught up in a machinery of repetition rather than revision? Or are there ways of thinking the old and the new differently altogether?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
corsets, femininity, feminist theory, steampunk cultures, temporality
National Category
Gender Studies
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-21483 (URN)10.1177/1367877913513697 (DOI)000353213400012 ()2-s2.0-84930396622 (Scopus ID)946/42/2011 (Local ID)946/42/2011 (Archive number)946/42/2011 (OAI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P11-0091:1
Available from: 2014-01-21 Created: 2014-01-21 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. (2015). On trans-, glitch and gender as machinery of failure. First Monday, 20(4), Article ID 5895.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On trans-, glitch and gender as machinery of failure
2015 (English)In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 4, article id 5895Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper develops an understanding of gender as something fundamentally technological, and as such broken. Drawing on the technological undercurrent in current posthumanist feminist theory, it puts into play a vocabulary of malfunctioning, broken, vulnerable technologies, and in particular uses the term ‘glitch’ to account for machinic failures in gender within the digital domain. As an intriguing example of the technologies of (trans)gender, the core example consists of the social media presence and public transition of Isabella Bunny Bennett — a musical performer and a member of the U.S.-based band Steam Powered Giraffe. Drawing on how glitch is understood as an accidental error and a critical potential in aesthetic practices, the article is a contribution to what recently has been coined ‘glitch feminism.’

Keywords
digital media studies, gender, glitch, posthumanist feminist theory, technology, transgender studies
National Category
Gender Studies Media Studies Cultural Studies
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-27403 (URN)10.5210/fm.v20i4.5895 (DOI)2-s2.0-84928686530 (Scopus ID)946/42/2011 (Local ID)946/42/2011 (Archive number)946/42/2011 (OAI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P11-0091:1
Available from: 2015-05-08 Created: 2015-05-08 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Sundén, J. (2015). Spelförälskelser: om närhet och queera begär i feminisktisk forskning på onlinespel. In: Anja Hirdman; Madeleine Kleberg (Ed.), Mediers känsla för kön: feministisk medieforskning (pp. 107-122). Göteborg: Nordicom
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spelförälskelser: om närhet och queera begär i feminisktisk forskning på onlinespel
2015 (Swedish)In: Mediers känsla för kön: feministisk medieforskning / [ed] Anja Hirdman; Madeleine Kleberg, Göteborg: Nordicom, 2015, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Nordicom, 2015
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-27790 (URN)978-91-87957-12-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-06-18 Created: 2015-06-18 Last updated: 2015-07-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Somatechnical Figurations: Kinships, Bodies, Affects [2011-07775_VR]; Södertörn UniversityClockwork, Corsets, and Brass: The Politics and Dreams of Steampunk Cultures [P11-0091:1_RJ]; Södertörn University; Publications
Sundén, J. (2015). Clockwork Corsets: Pressed Against the Past. International journal of cultural studies, 18(3), 379-383Sundén, J. (2015). On trans-, glitch and gender as machinery of failure. First Monday, 20(4), Article ID 5895. Sundén, J. (2015). Technologies of Feeling: Affect between the Analog and the Digital. In: Ken Hillis, Susanna Paasonen, and Michael Petit (Ed.), Networked Affect: (pp. 135-150). Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT PressSundén, J. (2015). Temporalities of Transition: Trans- temporal Femininity in a Human Musical Automaton. Somatechnics, 5(2), 197-216Sundén, J. (2014). Steampunk Practices: Time, Tactility, and a Racial Politics of Touch. Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology (5)Sundén, J. (2013). Corporeal Anachronisms: Notes on Affect, Relationality, and Power in Steampunk. Somatechnics, 3(2), 369-386Dahl, U. & Sundén, J. (2013). Guest Editors’ Introduction: Somatechnical Figurations. Somatechnics, 3(2), 225-232Sundén, J. (2012). Ångpunkens politik. In: Erling Bjurström, Martin Fredriksson, Ulf OIsson och Ann Werner (Ed.), Senmoderna reflexioner: Festskrift till Johan Fornäs (pp. 91-99). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6047-4369

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