sh.sePublications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Gunnarson, M. (2016). Avhandlingspresentation: Please Be Patient: A Cultural Phenomenological Study of Haemodialysis and Kidney Transplantation Care. Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, 93(3), 332-332
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avhandlingspresentation: Please Be Patient: A Cultural Phenomenological Study of Haemodialysis and Kidney Transplantation Care
2016 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 332-332Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Ethnology Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30740 (URN)1169/42/2007:3 (Local ID)1169/42/2007:3 (Archive number)1169/42/2007:3 (OAI)
External cooperation:
Projects
Kroppen som gåva, resurs och vara: Organtransplantationer i Östersjöområdet
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Ambagtsheer, F., Gunnarson, M., van Balen, L., Ivanovski, N., Lundin, S., Byström, I. & Weimar, W. (2016). Organ Recipients who Paid for Kidney Transplantation abroad: A Report. In: Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar (Ed.), Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations. Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organ Recipients who Paid for Kidney Transplantation abroad: A Report
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations / [ed] Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016
National Category
Medical Ethics Ethnology Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30739 (URN)978-3-95853-121-5 (ISBN)978-3-95853-122-2 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-09-01Bibliographically approved
Gunnarson, M. (2016). Please Be Patient: A Cultural Phenomenological Study of Haemodialysis and Kidney Transplantation Care. (Doctoral dissertation). Lund: Lund University Open Access
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Please Be Patient: A Cultural Phenomenological Study of Haemodialysis and Kidney Transplantation Care
2016 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis examines the practice of haemodialysis and kidney transplantation, the two medical therapies available for persons with kidney failure, from a phenomenological perspective. A basic assumption made in the thesis is that contemporary biomedicine is deeply embedded in the cultural, historical, economic, and political circumstances provided by the particular local, national, and transnational contexts in which it is practiced. The aim of the thesis is twofold. On the one hand, the aim is to examine the forms of person- and patienthood enacted and negotiated in haemodialysis and kidney transplantation care and in the daily lives of persons with kidney failure. On the other hand, the aim is to investigate the ways in which the enacted and negotiated forms of person- and patienthood are culturally embedded and normatively charged. In order to examine and investigate this twofold aim, an empirical material has been gathered that comprises observations and in-depth interviews with patients and caregivers at four haemodialysis units, one in Riga, Latvia, and three in Stockholm, Sweden. The theoretical approach and methodology of the study is cultural and phenomenological in character, drawing on an ethnological and anthropological understanding of culture as processual and relational, and on a phenomenological understanding of personhood as embodied and intertwined with the surrounding world. The thesis shows that patients’ encounters and attempts to deal with the diagnoses and treatments associated with kidney failure are complex and often misalign them with the normatively charged orientations enacted and recommended by medicine. The complex situation that emerges when they undergo transplantation, for example, stands in stark contrast to the widespread official view of organ transplantation as a self-evidently health-bringing and normalising therapy. Through their repeated and extensive experiences of undergoing haemodialysis and living with the disease, patients eventually become able to create a synthesis between their lived experiences of their own body and their body as a medical object – what in the thesis is called a ‘sick body’ – a synthesis that allows them to reorient themselves in life and experience a sense of direction. This process relies, to a large extent, on the temporal structure that haemodialysis affords life; it is by repeatedly undergoing the treatment that patients become able to create a sick body. Even so, many of them find this temporal structure problematic; they experience it as disruptive of their control and future-orientedness and as causing an existentially difficult-to-handle boredom. The thesis also shows that the political developments and the norms prevalent in the two national contexts studied greatly affect the orientations of the treatment practices and the participants’ lives. In both Riga and Stockholm, ideals of freedom, activity, control, and self-actualisation influence what forms of patienthood and personhood are enacted. The study indicates that persons who fall ill with a serious and chronic disease only gradually become able to understand and actively cope with their differently embodied circumstances of life. This suggests that medical professionals should not too hastily enlist their patients as experts on their own bodies, but rather provide them with the time and support necessary for making repeated attempts at creating and maintaining a life with a sick body.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Lund University Open Access, 2016. p. 435
Series
Södertörn Doctoral Dissertations, ISSN 1652-7399 ; 114
Series
Lund Studies In Arts And Cultural Sciences, ISSN 2001-7529 ; 7
Keywords
haemodialysis, kidney transplantation, kidney failure, patienthood, culture, phenomenology, embodiment, medical practice, neoliberalism
National Category
Cultural Studies Ethnology Philosophy
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28914 (URN)978-91-981458-3-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2016-01-29, MB503, Alfred Nobels allé 7, Huddinge, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2016-10-06Bibliographically approved
Pascalev, A., Van Assche, K., Sándor, J., Codreanu, N., Naqvi, A., Gunnarson, M., . . . Yankov, J. (2016). Protection of Human Beings Trafficked for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Recommendations. Transplantation Direct, 2(2), 1-4, Article ID e59.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protection of Human Beings Trafficked for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Recommendations
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Transplantation Direct, ISSN 2373-8731, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 1-4, article id e59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This report presents a comprehensive set of recommendations for protection of human beings who are trafficked for the purpose of organ removal or are targeted for such trafficking. Developed by an interdisciplinary group of international experts under the auspices of the project Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal (also known as the HOTT project), these recommendations are grounded in the view that an individual who parts with an organ for money within an illegal scheme is ipso facto a victim and that the crime of trafficking in human beings for the purpose of organ removal (THBOR) intersects with the crime of trafficking in organs. Consequently, the protection of victims should be a priority for all actors involved in antitrafficking activities: those combating organ-related crimes, such as health organizations and survivor support services, and those combating trafficking in human beings, such as the criminal justice sectors. Taking into account the special characteristics of THBOR, the authors identify 5 key stakeholders in the protection of human beings trafficked for organ removal or targeted for such trafficking: states, law enforcement agencies and judiciary, nongovernmental organizations working in the areas of human rights and antitrafficking, transplant centers and health professionals involved in transplant medicine, and oversight bodies. For each stakeholder, the authors identify key areas of concern and concrete measures to identify and protect the victims of THBOR. The aim of the recommendations is to contribute to the development of a nonlegislative response to THBOR, to promote the exchange of knowledge and best practices in the area of victim protection, and to facilitate the development of a policy-driven action plan for the protection of THBOR victims in the European Union and worldwide.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2016
National Category
Ethics Philosophy Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29503 (URN)10.1097/TXD.0000000000000565 (DOI)
Projects
Combating Trafficking in Persons for the Purpose of Organ Removal, The HOTT-project
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2016-02-19Bibliographically approved
Ambagtsheer, F., Gunnarson, M., de Jong, J., Lundin, S., van Balen, L., Orr, Z., . . . Weimar, W. (2016). Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: A Case Study Report. In: Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar (Ed.), Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations. Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: A Case Study Report
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations / [ed] Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016
National Category
Medical Ethics Ethnology Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30738 (URN)978-3-95853-121-5 (ISBN)978-3-95853-122-2 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-09-01Bibliographically approved
Pascalev, A., de Jong, J., Ambagtsheer, F., Lundin, S., Ivanovski, N., Codreanu, N., . . . Weimar, W. (2016). Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: A Comprehensive Literature Review. In: Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar (Ed.), Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations. Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: A Comprehensive Literature Review
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Trafficking in Human Beings for the Purpose of Organ Removal: Results and Recommendations / [ed] Frederike Ambagtsheer & Willem Weimar, Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lengerich: Pabst Science Publishers, 2016
National Category
Medical Ethics Ethnology Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30737 (URN)978-3-95853-121-5 (ISBN)978-3-95853-122-2 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Projects
The HOTT-project: Combating Trafficking in Persons for the Purpose of Organ Removal
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2016-09-01Bibliographically approved
Gunnarson, M. & Lundin, S. (2015). The Complexities of Victimhood: Insights from the Organ Trade. Somatechnics, 5(1), 32-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Complexities of Victimhood: Insights from the Organ Trade
2015 (English)In: Somatechnics, ISSN 2044-0138, E-ISSN 2044-0146, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 32-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to explore the complexity of the concept of the victim within the context of organ trading. By examining the intricate phenomenon of organ trade, we show how prevailing notions of victimhood form the basis of concrete social practices. The empirical basis for this exploration comprises in-depth interviews conducted during fieldwork in South Africa and Kosovo. We also draw on research undertaken at various expert meetings. What our research in these locations attests to is that one-dimensional and generalised conceptualisations of victimhood are rife, and that these tend to be founded on a pre-theorised opposition between agency and victimhood. For persons who become practically and intimately involved in dealing with cases of organ trade – such as investigators and prosecutors – such conceptualisations do not hold. What is required is an understanding of victimhood that takes into account its complexity. In this paper, we explore attempts to grasp and reduce this complexity, and argue against generalised concepts of victimhood and for concepts that are sensitive to contextual and relational variations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2015
Keywords
organ trade, victimhood, agency, ethnography, culture theory
National Category
Philosophy Ethnology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29502 (URN)10.3366/soma.2015.0146 (DOI)000358598600004 ()
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Gunnarson, M. (2012). Concealed by the "Gift of Life": The Complexities of Living with Dialysis and Kidney Transplantaiton in Stockholm and Riga. In: Martin Gunnarson, Fredrik Svenaeus (Ed.), The Body as Gift, Resource, and Commodity: Exchanging Organs,Tissues, and Cells in the 21st Century (pp. 103-136). Huddinge: Södertörns högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concealed by the "Gift of Life": The Complexities of Living with Dialysis and Kidney Transplantaiton in Stockholm and Riga
2012 (English)In: The Body as Gift, Resource, and Commodity: Exchanging Organs,Tissues, and Cells in the 21st Century / [ed] Martin Gunnarson, Fredrik Svenaeus, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2012, p. 103-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2012
Series
Södertörn Studies in Practical Knowledge ; 6
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-15907 (URN)1169/42/2007:3 (Local ID)978-91-86069-49-0 (ISBN)1169/42/2007:3 (Archive number)1169/42/2007:3 (OAI)
Projects
Kroppen som gåva, resurs och vara: Organtransplantationer i östersjöområdet.
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies
Available from: 2012-03-16 Created: 2012-03-16 Last updated: 2016-10-06Bibliographically approved
Gunnarson, M. & Svenaeus, F. (Eds.). (2012). The Body as Gift, Resource, and Commodity: Exchanging Organs, Tissues, and Cells in the 21st Century (1ed.). Huddinge: Södertörns högskola
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Body as Gift, Resource, and Commodity: Exchanging Organs, Tissues, and Cells in the 21st Century
2012 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Departing from three metaphors—the body as gift, resource, and commodity—the book explores the contemporary exchange of organs, tissues, and cells. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating parts of the body, the underlying perspective from the side of states, authorities, and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall be understood as a resource. But medicine, as some of the contributors to this book show, is not sealed off from the market economy. Increasingly, therefore, body parts become commodities on legal as well as illegal markets.

The chapters of the book are arranged in a way that presents, one after the other, the three metaphors of the body, starting with the body as gift, proceeding by way of the body as resource, and ending in the body as commodity. Although all three metaphors as ways of conceptualizing and making use of the human body can be found throughout human history, the present drive of commercialization will increasingly force us to identify and scrutinize the way these metaphors are used. Not only in addressing the fascinating question of what kind of an object (subject) the human body is, but also in trying to decipher what interests lurk behind the use of the metaphors in question when claiming that human bodies, organs, tissues, and cells are gifts, resources or commodities. The ambition of this volume is to address and remedy the need of a hermeneutics not only of depth, but also of suspicion, in the case of organ transplantation and other medical technologies involving the transfer of human tissues and cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2012. p. 400 Edition: 1
Series
Södertörn Studies in Practical Knowledge ; 6
National Category
Learning
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory; Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-15902 (URN)1169/42/2007:3 (Local ID)978-91-86069-49-0 (ISBN)1169/42/2007:3 (Archive number)1169/42/2007:3 (OAI)
Projects
Kroppen som gåva, resurs och vara: organtransplantationer i Östersjöområdet
Funder
The Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies, 1169/42/2007:3
Available from: 2012-03-16 Created: 2012-03-15 Last updated: 2016-10-10Bibliographically approved
Gunnarson, M. (2011). Delade erfarenheter eller egen expertis: att vara dialyspatient i Riga och Stockholm. Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, 88(3), 257-265
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Delade erfarenheter eller egen expertis: att vara dialyspatient i Riga och Stockholm
2011 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Ethnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-14523 (URN)
Available from: 2012-01-05 Created: 2012-01-05 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6989-3212

Search in DiVA

Show all publications