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Bali Swain, Ranjula
Publications (10 of 67) Show all publications
Rampal, P. & Bali Swain, R. (2019). Food Security, agriculture and malnutrition in India. In: R. Jha (Ed.), Hunger and Malnutrition as major challenges of the 21st Century: . World Scientific
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Food Security, agriculture and malnutrition in India
2019 (English)In: Hunger and Malnutrition as major challenges of the 21st Century / [ed] R. Jha, World Scientific, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2019
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-33423 (URN)978-981-3239-90-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2018-04-23
Bali Swain, R. (2018). A Critical Analysis of the Sustainable Development Goals. In: Leal Filho, Walter (Ed.), Handbook of Sustainability Science and Research: (pp. 341-356). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Critical Analysis of the Sustainable Development Goals
2018 (English)In: Handbook of Sustainability Science and Research / [ed] Leal Filho, Walter, Cham: Springer, 2018, p. 341-356Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The ambitious UN-adopted sustainable development goals (SDGs) have been criticized for being inconsistent, difficult to quantify, implement and monitor. Disparaging analysis suggests that there exists a potential inconsistency in the SDGs, particularly between the socio-economic development and the environmental sustainability goals. Critiques also raise questions on the measurability and monitoring of the broadly framed SDGs. The goals are non-binding, with each country being expected to create their own national or regional plans. Moreover, the source(s) and the extent of the financial resources and investments for the SDGs are ambiguous. This chapter quantifies and examines the inconsistencies of the SDGs. It further inspects which of the underlying social, economic or environmental pillars are that most effective for achieving sustainable development. Analyses of the data reveal that the developed countries need to remain focused on their social and environmental policies. The developing countries, on the other hand, are better off being focused on their economics and social policies in the short run, even though environmental policies remain significant for sustainable development.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2018
Series
World Sustainability Series, ISSN 2199-7373
Keywords
Sustainable development goals, Sustainable development incompatibility, Structural equation modelling, Factor analysis, UN data revolution
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32405 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-63007-6_20 (DOI)978-3-319-63007-6 (ISBN)978-3-319-63006-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
Kar, A. K. & Bali Swain, R. (2018). Are microfinance markets monopolistic?. Applied Economics, 58(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are microfinance markets monopolistic?
2018 (English)In: Applied Economics, ISSN 0003-6846, E-ISSN 1466-4283, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Do microfinance institutions (MFIs) operate in a monopoly, monopolistic competition environment or are their revenues derived under perfect competition markets? We employ the Panzar–Rosse revenue test on a global panel data to assess the competitive environment in which MFIs of five selected countries operate: Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Peru and Philippines, over the period 2005–2009. We estimate the static and the dynamic revenue tests, with analyses of the interest rate and the return on assets. We control for microfinance-specific variables such as capital-assets-ratio, loans-assets and the size of the MFI. The analyses also account for the endogeneity problem by employing the fixed-effects two-stage least squares and the fixed-effects system generalized method of moments. Our results suggest that MFIs in Peru and India operate in a monopolistic environment. We also find weak evidence that the microfinance industry in Ecuador, Indonesia and Philippines may operate under perfect competition.

Keywords
Microfinance, Competition, market structure, dynamic panel estimation, GMM estimation, Panzar-Rosse revenue tests
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Other research area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32401 (URN)10.1080/00036846.2017.1310999 (DOI)000418735000001 ()2-s2.0-85017441725 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Ranganathan, S. & Bali Swain, R. (2018). Sustainable Development and global emission targets: A dynamical systems approach to aid evidence-based policy making. Sustainable Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Development and global emission targets: A dynamical systems approach to aid evidence-based policy making
2018 (English)In: Sustainable Development, ISSN 0968-0802, E-ISSN 1099-1719Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

There is broad scientific consensus that increasing global emissions at current rates will result irreversible climate change. The global commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris agreement tries to address this concern with policy changes. But top-down approaches including voluntary emission cuts do not seem politically feasible in all countries. In this paper, we show that moderate voluntary emission cuts (policy) supplemented by technological developments and changes in consumption tastes and preferences induced by educating individuals (stakeholder engagement) could help achieve emission targets. We use a novel dynamical systems modeling approach based on economic theory to show the quantitative tradeoffs between these different approaches. Using this model, we also show how economic development may be balanced by global emissions reductions so that, initially, developing economies can continue along their current growth trajectories and eliminate poverty, and eventually bear more of the emissions reduction burden.

Keywords
Green Solow, emission targets, Sustainable Development Goals, dynamical systems, environment policy, greenhouse gases
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Politics, Economy and the Organization of Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34852 (URN)
Available from: 2018-04-16 Created: 2018-04-16 Last updated: 2018-07-02
Pädam, S. & Bali Swain, R. (2017). Attitudes Towards Paying for Environmental Protection in the Baltic Sea Region (1ed.). In: Bali Swain, Ranjula (Ed.), Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: A Perspective from Economics (pp. 201-220). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes Towards Paying for Environmental Protection in the Baltic Sea Region
2017 (English)In: Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: A Perspective from Economics / [ed] Bali Swain, Ranjula, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 1, p. 201-220Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter compares public attitudes to environmental protection in Estonia with those in neighbouring Baltic states. Data from the Estonian Environmental Survey (The Chair of Environmental Economics. Tallinn University of Technology, Tallinn, 2010) and ISSP Environment III are compared and analysed using an ordered logit. Support for environmental protection is measured in the form of willingness of individuals to make financial sacrifices through higher prices and higher taxes or accepting a cut in their standard of living, in order to protect the environment. Results show that the demand for the protection of the environment tends to increase with income. There are some differences between public attitudes in terms of willingness to accept cuts in the standard of living and willingness to pay higher taxes and prices. Higher education is another determinant of support for environmental protection, particularly in Estonia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017 Edition: 1
Keywords
Environmental protection, Public attitudes, Estonia
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32404 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-56007-6_9 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034842800 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-56006-9 (ISBN)978-3-319-56007-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Bali Swain, R. (Ed.). (2017). Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: A Perspective from Economics (1ed.). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: A Perspective from Economics
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. p. 320 Edition: 1
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32402 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-56007-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034857541 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-56006-9 (ISBN)978-3-319-56007-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Bali Swain, R. (2017). Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: An Introduction. In: Bali Swain, Ranjula (Ed.), Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: A Perspective from Economics (pp. 1-3). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: An Introduction
2017 (English)In: Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region: A Perspective from Economics / [ed] Bali Swain, Ranjula, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 1-3Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Baltic and East European studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32403 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-56007-6_1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85034861246 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-56006-9 (ISBN)978-3-319-56007-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Ranganathan, S., Nicolis, S. C., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. J. (2017). Setting development goals using stochastic dynamical system models. PLoS ONE, 12(2), Article ID e0171560.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Setting development goals using stochastic dynamical system models
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 2, article id e0171560Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Millennium Development Goals (MDG) programme was an ambitious attempt to encourage a globalised solution to important but often-overlooked development problems. The programme led to wide-ranging development but it has also been criticised for unrealistic and arbitrary targets. In this paper, we show how country-specific development targets can be set using stochastic, dynamical system models built from historical data. In particular, we show that the MDG target of two-thirds reduction of child mortality from 1990 levels was infeasible for most countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the MDG targets were not ambitious enough for fast-developing countries such as Brazil and China. We suggest that model-based setting of country-specific targets is essential for the success of global development programmes such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). This approach should provide clear, quantifiable targets for policymakers.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-32196 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0171560 (DOI)000395934400006 ()28241057 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014021572 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-03-03 Created: 2017-03-03 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Bali Swain, R. & Wallentin, F. Y. (2017). The impact of microfinance on factors empowering women: Differences in regional and delivery mechanisms in India’s SHG programme. Journal of Development Studies, 53(5), 684-699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of microfinance on factors empowering women: Differences in regional and delivery mechanisms in India’s SHG programme
2017 (English)In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, Vol. 53, no 5, p. 684-699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine how the impact on women empowerment varies with respect to the location and type of group linkage of the respondent. Using household survey data from five states in India, we correct for selection bias to estimate a structural equation model. Our results reveal that in the southern states of India empowerment of women takes place through economic factors. For the other states, we find a significant correlation between women empowerment and autonomy in women’s decision-making and network, communication and political participation respectively. We do not however find any differential causal impact of different delivery methods (linkage models).

Keywords
microfinance, women empowerment, structural equation models, self help groups
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-28219 (URN)10.1080/00220388.2016.1205732 (DOI)000396821800004 ()2-s2.0-84987653169 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
Spaiser, V., Ranganathan, S., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. J. (2017). The sustainable development oxymoron: quantifying and modelling the incompatibility of sustainable development goals. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 24(6), 457-470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The sustainable development oxymoron: quantifying and modelling the incompatibility of sustainable development goals
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 457-470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2015, the UN adopted a new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to eradicate poverty, establish socioeconomic inclusion and protect the environment. Critical voices such as the International Council for Science (ICSU), however, have expressed concerns about the potential incompatibility of the SDGs, specifically the incompatibility of socio-economic development and environmental sustainability. In this paper, we test, quantify and model the alleged inconsistency of SDGs. Our analyses show which SDGs are consistent and which are conflicting. We measure the extent of inconsistency and conclude that the SDG agenda will fail as a whole if we continue with business as usual. We further explore the nature of the inconsistencies using dynamical systems models, which reveal that the focus on economic growth and consumption as a means for development underlies the inconsistency. Our models also show that there are factors which can contribute to development (health programmes, government investment) on the one hand and ecological sustainability (renewable energy) on the other, without triggering the conflict between incompatible SDGs. © 2016 The Author(s).

Keywords
dynamical systems modelling, factor analysis, feature selection, sustainable development, Sustainable development goals, UN data revolution
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30991 (URN)10.1080/13504509.2016.1235624 (DOI)000410913600001 ()2-s2.0-84988568773 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-10-13 Created: 2016-10-13 Last updated: 2018-04-05Bibliographically approved
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