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Laukka, Petri
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Feingold, D., Hasson-Ohayon, I., Laukka, P., Vishne, T., Dembinsky, Y. & Kravets, S. (2016). Emotion recognition deficits among persons with schizophrenia: Beyond stimulus complexity level and presentation modality.. Psychiatry Research, 240, 60-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion recognition deficits among persons with schizophrenia: Beyond stimulus complexity level and presentation modality.
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2016 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 240, p. 60-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown that persons with schizophrenia have lower accuracy in emotion recognition compared to persons without schizophrenia. However, the impact of the complexity level of the stimuli or the modality of presentation has not been extensively addressed. Forty three persons with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 43 healthy controls, matched for age and gender, were administered tests assessing emotion recognition from stimuli with low and high levels of complexity presented via visual, auditory and semantic channels. For both groups, recognition rates were higher for high-complexity stimuli compared to low-complexity stimuli. Additionally, both groups obtained higher recognition rates for visual and semantic stimuli than for auditory stimuli, but persons with schizophrenia obtained lower accuracy than persons in the control group for all presentation modalities. Persons diagnosed with schizophrenia did not present a level of complexity specific deficit or modality-specific deficit compared to healthy controls. Results suggest that emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia are beyond level of complexity of stimuli and modality, and present a global difficulty in cognitive functioning.

Keywords
Facial expressions; Visual; Semantics; Prosody
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-29949 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2016.04.015 (DOI)000378359500010 ()27085665 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84979590877 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-05-02 Created: 2016-05-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Bhatara, A., Laukka, P., Boll-Avetisyan, N., Granjon, L., Elfenbein, H. A. & Banziger, T. (2016). Second Language Ability and Emotional Prosody Perception. PLoS ONE, 11(6), Article ID e0156855.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Second Language Ability and Emotional Prosody Perception
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 6, article id e0156855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study examines the effect of language experience on vocal emotion perception in a second language. Native speakers of French with varying levels of self-reported English ability were asked to identify emotions from vocal expressions produced by American actors in a forced-choice task, and to rate their pleasantness, power, alertness and intensity on continuous scales. Stimuli included emotionally expressive English speech (emotional prosody) and non-linguistic vocalizations (affect bursts), and a baseline condition with Swiss-French pseudo-speech. Results revealed effects of English ability on the recognition of emotions in English speech but not in non-linguistic vocalizations. Specifically, higher English ability was associated with less accurate identification of positive emotions, but not with the interpretation of negative emotions. Moreover, higher English ability was associated with lower ratings of pleasantness and power, again only for emotional prosody. This suggests that second language skills may sometimes interfere with emotion recognition from speech prosody, particularly for positive emotions.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-30618 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0156855 (DOI)000377218700066 ()27253326 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84973664669 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-07-20 Created: 2016-07-18 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Yamasaki, T., Yamada, K. & Laukka, P. (2015). Viewing the world through the prism of music: Effects of music on perceptions of the environment. Psychology of Music, 43(1), 61-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Viewing the world through the prism of music: Effects of music on perceptions of the environment
2015 (English)In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 61-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Questionnaire and interview studies suggest that music is valued for its role in managing the listener’s impression of the environment, but systematic investigations on the topic are scarce. We present a field experiment wherein participants were asked to rate their impression of four different environments (a quiet residential area, traveling by train in the suburbs, at a busy crossroads, and in a tranquil park area) on bipolar adjective scales, while listening to music (which varied regarding level of perceived activation and valence) or in silence. Results showed that the evaluation of the environment was in general affected in the direction of the characteristics of the music, especially in conditions where the perceived characteristics of the music and environment were incongruent. For example, highly active music increased the activation ratings of environments which were perceived as inactive without music, whereas inactive music decreased the activation ratings of environments which were perceived as highly active without music. Also, highly positive music increased the positivity ratings of the environments. In sum, the findings suggest that music may function as a prism that modifies the impression of one’s surroundings. Different theoretical explanations of the results are discussed.

Keywords
adjective ratings, landscape, music, perception, physical environment, portable music players
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26858 (URN)10.1177/0305735613493954 (DOI)000346558400004 ()2-s2.0-84919458347 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-12-16 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved
Kantrowitz, J. T., Scaramello, N., Jakubovitz, A., Lehrfeld, J. M., Laukka, P., Elfenbein, H. A., . . . Javitt, D. C. (2014). Amusia and protolanguage impairments in schizophrenia. Psychological Medicine, 44(13), 2739-2748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amusia and protolanguage impairments in schizophrenia
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2014 (English)In: Psychological Medicine, ISSN 0033-2917, E-ISSN 1469-8978, Vol. 44, no 13, p. 2739-2748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Both language and music are thought to have evolved from a musical protolanguage that communicated social information, including emotion. Individuals with perceptual music disorders (amusia) show deficits in auditory emotion recognition (AER). Although auditory perceptual deficits have been studied in schizophrenia, their relationship with musical/protolinguistic competence has not previously been assessed. Method. Musical ability was assessed in 31 schizophrenia/schizo-affective patients and 44 healthy controls using the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA). AER was assessed using a novel battery in which actors provided portrayals of five separate emotions. The Disorganization factor of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was used as a proxy for language/thought disorder and the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) was used to assess cognition. Results. Highly significant deficits were seen between patients and controls across auditory tasks (p<0.001). Moreover, significant differences were seen in AER between the amusia and intact music-perceiving groups, which remained significant after controlling for group status and education. Correlations with AER were specific to the melody domain, and correlations between protolanguage (melody domain) and language were independent of overall cognition. Discussion. This is the first study to document a specific relationship between amusia, AER and thought disorder, suggesting a shared linguistic/protolinguistic impairment. Once amusia was considered, other cognitive factors were no longer significant predictors of AER, suggesting that musical ability in general and melodic discrimination ability in particular may be crucial targets for treatment development and cognitive remediation in schizophrenia.

Keywords
Amusia, emotion, language, music, schizophrenia, social cognition
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26848 (URN)10.1017/S0033291714000373 (DOI)000340721300006 ()25066878 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84924482028 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2017-07-17Bibliographically approved
Laukka, P., Neiberg, D. & Elfenbein, H. A. (2014). Evidence for Cultural Dialects in Vocal Emotion Expression: Acoustic Classification Within and Across Five Nations. Emotion, 14(3), 445-449
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence for Cultural Dialects in Vocal Emotion Expression: Acoustic Classification Within and Across Five Nations
2014 (English)In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 445-449Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibility of cultural differences in the fundamental acoustic patterns used to express emotion through the voice is an unanswered question central to the larger debate about the universality versus cultural specificity of emotion. This study used emotionally inflected standard-content speech segments expressing 11 emotions produced by 100 professional actors from 5 English-speaking cultures. Machine learning simulations were employed to classify expressions based on their acoustic features, using conditions where training and testing were conducted on stimuli coming from either the same or different cultures. A wide range of emotions were classified with above-chance accuracy in cross-cultural conditions, suggesting vocal expressions share important characteristics across cultures. However, classification showed an in-group advantage with higher accuracy in within-versus cross-cultural conditions. This finding demonstrates cultural differences in expressive vocal style, and supports the dialect theory of emotions according to which greater recognition of expressions from in-group members results from greater familiarity with culturally specific expressive styles.

Keywords
cultural dialects, vocal emotion expression, acoustic, classification
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26849 (URN)10.1037/a0036048 (DOI)000349169700001 ()24749633 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84901774757 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Bhatara, A., Laukka, P. & Levitin, D. J. (Eds.). (2014). Expression of emotion in music and vocal communication. Lausanne: Frontiers Media
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of emotion in music and vocal communication
2014 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Two of the most important social skills in humans are the ability to determine the moods of those around us, and to use this to guide our behavior. To accomplish this, we make use of numerous cues. Among the most important are vocal cues from both speech and non-speech sounds. Music is also a reliable method for communicating emotion. It is often present in social situations and can serve to unify a group's mood for ceremonial purposes (funerals, weddings) or general social interactions. Scientists and philosophers have speculated on the origins of music and language, and the possible common bases of emotional expression through music, speech and other vocalizations. They have found increasing evidence of commonalities among them. However, the domains in which researchers investigate these topics do not always overlap or share a common language, so communication between disciplines has been limited. The aim of this Research Topic is to bring together research across multiple disciplines related to the production and perception of emotional cues in music, speech, and non-verbal vocalizations. This includes natural sounds produced by human and non-human primates as well as synthesized sounds. Research methodology includes survey, behavioral, and neuroimaging techniques investigating adults as well as developmental populations, including those with atypical development. Studies using laboratory tasks as well as studies in more naturalistic settings are included.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lausanne: Frontiers Media, 2014. p. 285
Keywords
acoustic features, brain processing, cross-cultural, developmental aspects, emotion expression, felt emotion, music perception, music performance, speech prosody, vocalizations
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26868 (URN)10.3389/978-2-88919-263-2 (DOI)978-2-88919-263-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-11-25 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2015-04-10Bibliographically approved
Bhatara, A., Laukka, P. & Levitin, D. J. (2014). Expression of emotion in music and vocal communication: Introduction to the research topic. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, Article ID 399.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of emotion in music and vocal communication: Introduction to the research topic
2014 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 5, article id 399Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

In social interactions, we must gauge the emotional state of others in order to behave appropriately. We rely heavily on auditory cues, specifically speech prosody, to do this. Music is also a complex auditory signal with the capacity to communicate emotion rapidly and effectively and often occurs in social situations or ceremonies as an emotional unifier.

In sum, the main contribution of this Research Topic, along with highlighting the variety of research being done already, is to show the places of contact between the domains of music and vocal expression that occur at the level of emotional communication. In addition, we hope it will encourage future dialog among researchers interested in emotion in fields as diverse as computer science, linguistics, musicology, neuroscience, psychology, speech and hearing sciences, and sociology, who can each contribute knowledge necessary for studying this complex topic.

Keywords
expression, emotion, music, vocal communication, introduction
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26850 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00399 (DOI)000335975900001 ()24829557 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84904546911 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kantrowitz, J. T., Jakubovitz, A., Scaramello, N., Laukka, P., Silipo, G. & Javitt, D. C. (2013). Are Schizophrenia Patients Amusical?: The Role of Pitch and Rhythm in Auditory Emotion Recognition Impairments in Schizophrenia. Paper presented at 68th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry, MAY 16-18, 2013, San Francisco, CA. Biological Psychiatry, 73(9), 18S-18S
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Schizophrenia Patients Amusical?: The Role of Pitch and Rhythm in Auditory Emotion Recognition Impairments in Schizophrenia
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2013 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 18S-18SArticle in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Keywords
schizophrenia, music, emotion, auditory
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26853 (URN)000318671800056 ()
Conference
68th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society-of-Biological-Psychiatry, MAY 16-18, 2013, San Francisco, CA
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Laukka, P., Elfenbein, H. A., Söder, N., Nordström, H., Althoff, J., Chui, W., . . . Thingujam, N. S. (2013). Cross-cultural decoding of positive and negative non-linguistic emotion vocalizations. Frontiers in Psychology, 4, Article ID 353.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-cultural decoding of positive and negative non-linguistic emotion vocalizations
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2013 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 4, article id 353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Which emotions are associated with universally recognized non-verbal signals? We address this issue by examining how reliably non-linguistic vocalizations (affect bursts) can convey emotions across cultures. Actors from India, Kenya, Singapore, and USA were instructed to produce vocalizations that would convey nine positive and nine negative emotions to listeners. The vocalizations were judged by Swedish listeners using a within-valence forced-choice procedure, where positive and negative emotions were judged in separate experiments. Results showed that listeners could recognize a wide range of positive and negative emotions with accuracy above chance. For positive emotions, we observed the highest recognition rates for relief, followed by lust, interest, serenity and positive surprise, with affection and pride receiving the lowest recognition rates. Anger, disgust, fear, sadness, and negative surprise received the highest recognition rates for negative emotions, with the lowest rates observed for guilt and shame. By way of summary, results showed that the voice can reveal both basic emotions and several positive emotions other than happiness across cultures, but self-conscious emotions such as guilt, pride, and shame seem not to be well recognized from non-linguistic vocalizations.

Keywords
affect bursts, cross-cultural, emotion recognition, non-verbal behavior, positive emotions, vocalizations
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26851 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00353 (DOI)000331107600001 ()23914178 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84885401991 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-13 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Laukka, P. & Quick, L. (2013). Emotional and motivational uses of music in sports and exercise: A questionnaire study among athletes. Psychology of Music, 41(2), 198-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional and motivational uses of music in sports and exercise: A questionnaire study among athletes
2013 (English)In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 198-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Music is present in many sport and exercise situations, but empirical investigations on the motives for listening to music in sports remain scarce. In this study, Swedish elite athletes (N = 252) answered a questionnaire that focused on the emotional and motivational uses of music in sports and exercise. The questionnaire contained both quantitative items that assessed the prevalence of various uses of music, and open-ended items that targeted specific emotional episodes in relation to music in sports. Results showed that the athletes most often reported listening to music during pre-event preparations, warm-up, and training sessions; and the most common motives for listening to music were to increase pre-event activation, positive affect, motivation, performance levels and to experience flow. The athletes further reported that they mainly experienced positive affective states (e.g., happiness, alertness, confidence, relaxation) in relation to music in sports, and also reported on their beliefs about the causes of the musical emotion episodes in sports. In general, the results suggest that the athletes used music in purposeful ways in order to facilitate their training and performance.

Keywords
arousal, emotion, exercise, function of music, motivation, relaxation, sports, questionnaire
National Category
Psychology Music
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-26854 (URN)10.1177/0305735611422507 (DOI)000319129500003 ()2-s2.0-84876554519 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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