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Bolin, G. (2019). Generational “we-sense”, “they-sense” and narrative: An epistemological approach to media and social change. Empiria. Revista de metodología de ciencias sociales (42), 21-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Generational “we-sense”, “they-sense” and narrative: An epistemological approach to media and social change
2019 (English)In: Empiria. Revista de metodología de ciencias sociales, ISSN 2174-0682, no 42, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A classic epistemological problem in the social sciences is how to analyse and understand social change. In media and communication studies, for example, the concept of mediatisation has sparked off such a debate, since one of the main criticisms against the approach is that researchers rather take change for granted without being able to empirically establish if and how change has occurred. In this article is suggested a model for analysing social change through an analysis of how generational identity as “we-sense” is produced in narratives about media use. The empirical basis for the discussion is picked from a recently finished project on media generations in Sweden and Estonia, building on foremost qualitative material. The article concludes with accounting for the merits of using a generational perspective for analysing social change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, 2019
Keywords
Generation identity, social change epistemology, cross-cultural analysis, social conscience of historical development
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38471 (URN)10.5944/empiria.42.2019.23249 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Bolin, G. (2019). Value production in media industries and everyday life. In: Mark Deuze and Mirjam Prenger (Ed.), Making Media: Production, Practices, and Professions (pp. 111-119). Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Value production in media industries and everyday life
2019 (English)In: Making Media: Production, Practices, and Professions / [ed] Mark Deuze and Mirjam Prenger, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2019, p. 111-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2019
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-38437 (URN)9789462988118 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-06-20 Created: 2019-06-20 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Couldry, N., Rodriguez, C., Bolin, G., Cohen, J., Goggin, G., Kraidy, M., . . . Thomas, P. (2018). Media and Communications. In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 2: Political Regulation, Governance, and Societal Transformations (pp. 523-562). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media and Communications
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2018 (English)In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 2: Political Regulation, Governance, and Societal Transformations, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 523-562Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Developments in digital technologies over the last 30 years have expanded massively human beings' capacity to communicate and connect. Media infrastructures have acquired huge complexity as a result of rapid technological change and the uneven spread of access. This is a good time to think critically about 'connection' and its potential contribution to social progress. We first explore key developments in media infrastructures and communication flows across the world, bringing out salient differences in the local evolution of, and inequalities in media access. Second, we examine how media – as infrastructures of connection – contribute to public knowledge and enable new types of encounter between people on various scales, while also enabling counter-movements for social progress. Third, we examine the changing governance of media infrastructures, the issues of social justice that such infrastructures raise and the counter-movements to which they give rise. Fourth, we consider media as a specific site of struggle for social progress, arguing that measures of social progress themselves need to be expanded to take account of the human needs (such as voice) that media serve. Overall the chapter reflects on how media and communications flows and infrastructures both maintain and challenge asymmetries of power, with complex implications for social progress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-31347 (URN)978-1-108-42313-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Couldry, N., Rodriguez, C., Bolin, G., Cohen, J., Volkmer, I., Goggin, G., . . . Lee, K.-S. -. (2018). Media, communication and the struggle for social progress. Global Media and Communication, 14(2), 173-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media, communication and the struggle for social progress
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2018 (English)In: Global Media and Communication, ISSN 1742-7665, E-ISSN 1742-7673, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 173-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses the role of media and communications in contributing to social progress, as elaborated in a landmark international project – the International Panel on Social Progress. First, it analyses how media and digital platforms have contributed to global inequality by examining media access and infrastructure across world regions. Second, it looks at media governance and the different mechanisms of corporatized control over media platforms, algorithms and content. Third, the article examines how the democratization of media is a key element in the struggle for social justice. It argues that effective media access – in terms of distribution of media resources, even relations between spaces of connection and the design and operation of spaces that foster dialogue, free speech and respectful cultural exchange – is a core component of social progress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications Ltd, 2018
Keywords
Media access, media and communications governance, media and Internet regulation, social progress
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-35800 (URN)10.1177/1742766518776679 (DOI)000440674400002 ()2-s2.0-85048774868 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-11-13Bibliographically approved
Bolin, G. (2018). Media Use and the Extended Commodification of the Lifeworld. In: Bilić, Paško; Primorac, Jaka; Valtýsson, Bjarki (Ed.), Technologies of Labour and the Politics of Contradiction: (pp. 235-252). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Media Use and the Extended Commodification of the Lifeworld
2018 (English)In: Technologies of Labour and the Politics of Contradiction / [ed] Bilić, Paško; Primorac, Jaka; Valtýsson, Bjarki, Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 235-252Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the chapter Bolin argues that in the world of digital, interactive media, media users become involved in two kinds of valorisation processes: one in which they produce social, aesthetic and cultural value within the framework of a cultural economy – which then becomes appropriated by the media industries and transformed into economic value. Furthermore, the nature of the business models of social networking media makes the labour activities at their bottom easily misrecognized by the media users. The result of this process is an increased commodification of social realms that have previously been outside of the economic markets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
Series
Dynamics of Virtual Work ; 14954
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36942 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-76279-1_13 (DOI)978-3-319-76278-4 (ISBN)978-3-319-76279-1 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Bolin, G. & Jerslev, A. (2018). Surveillance through media, by media, in media. Northern Lights, 16(1), 3-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surveillance through media, by media, in media
2018 (English)In: Northern Lights, ISSN 1601-829X, E-ISSN 2040-0586, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 3-21Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Following the spread of digital media, the interdisciplinary field of surveillance studies has gained prominence, engaging scholars from the humanities and the social sciences alike. This introductory article aims to map out the main terrain of surveillance through, by and in the media. First, we discuss the phenomenon of, and the scholarly work on, surveillance through and by media, taking into consideration both state and corporate surveillance and how these activities have grown with the new digital and personal media of today. We then discuss surveillance as the phenomenon is represented in the media and how representations relate to surveillance practices. We conclude by presenting the articles of this special issue.

Keywords
Corporate surveillance, Counter-surveillance, Panspectric, Representation, Self-surveillance, State surveillance, Surveillance, Surveillance in film, Television
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-36150 (URN)10.1386/nl.16.1.3_2 (DOI)2-s2.0-85050977239 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-08-28Bibliographically approved
Bolin, G. & Miazhevich, G. (2018). The soft power of commercialised nationalist symbols: Using media analysis to understand nation branding campaigns. European Journal of Cultural Studies, 21(5), 527-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The soft power of commercialised nationalist symbols: Using media analysis to understand nation branding campaigns
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 527-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the late 1990s, nation branding has attracted a lot of attention from academics, professional consultants and government actors. The ideas and practices of nation branding are frequently presented by branding advocates as necessary and even inevitable in the light of changing dynamics of political power and influence in a globalised and media-saturated world. In this context, some have argued that nation branding is a way to reduce international conflict and supplant ethno-nationalism with a new form of market-based, national image management. However, a growing body of critical studies has documented that branding campaigns tend to produce ahistorical and exclusionary representations of the nation and advance a form of ‘commercial nationalism’ that is problematic. Importantly, the critical scholarship on nation branding has relied primarily on sociological and anthropological theories of nationhood, identities and markets. By contrast, the role of the media – as institutions, systems and societal storytellers – has been undertheorised in relation to nation branding. The majority of the existing literature tends to treat the media as ‘neutral’ vehicles for the delivery of branding messages to various audiences. This is the guest editors’ introduction to the Special Issue ‘Theorizing Media in Nation Branding’, which seeks to problematise this overly simplistic view of ‘the media’ and aims to articulate the various ways in which specific media are an integral part of nation branding. It adopts an interdisciplinary approach and problematises both the enabling and the inhibiting potentialities of different types of media as they perpetuate nation branding ideas, images, ideologies, discourses and practices.

Keywords
Media, media production, nation branding, nationalism, public diplomacy, soft power
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34665 (URN)10.1177/1367549417751153 (DOI)000446006000001 ()2-s2.0-85041619048 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-10-19Bibliographically approved
Driessens, O., Bolin, G., Hepp, A. & Hjarvard, S. (Eds.). (2017). Dynamics of Mediatization: Institutional Change and Everyday Transformations in a Digital Age. London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamics of Mediatization: Institutional Change and Everyday Transformations in a Digital Age
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This volume sheds light on the underlying dynamics of mediatization, disentangling the actual unfolding of mediatization processes. The wide adoption and deep embedding of digital media and technology brings new questions to mediatization studies: how can we grasp this ‘deep mediatization’? In which way should we develop existing approaches of mediatization to analyse such dynamics? What are the consequences of this for theorising and empirically studying mediatization?  By using these questions as a starting point, this book presents an innovative and original collection that is dedicated to both the underlying dynamics of mediatization and recent dynamics related to digital media.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. p. 338
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34022 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-62983-4 (DOI)978-3-319-62982-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Bolin, G. (2017). Generational analysis as a methodological approach to study mediatised social change. In: Sakari Taipale; Chris Gilleard; Terhi-Anna Wilska (Ed.), Digital Technologies and Generational Identity: ICT Usage Across the Life Course (pp. 23-36). Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Generational analysis as a methodological approach to study mediatised social change
2017 (English)In: Digital Technologies and Generational Identity: ICT Usage Across the Life Course / [ed] Sakari Taipale; Chris Gilleard; Terhi-Anna Wilska, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017, p. 23-36Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction Time and again, it is said that we are living in an era of rapid technological change, or even one of increased acceleration (Rosa, 2013 [2005]). This idea of accelerating technological change, especially that involving media technologies, also serves as a basis for contemporary theories of ‘media generations’. These theories argue that in contrast to previous generations who were socialised into print media culture, those born over the past 50−60 years have seen a much more rapid transformation of technologies, impacting more strongly on the formation of generational identity. According to Gary Gumpert and Robert Cathcart, the faster pace of technological change leads to the formation of distinct media generations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34490 (URN)10.4324/9781315398624 (DOI)2-s2.0-85040550995 (Scopus ID)978-1-315-39861-7 (ISBN)978-1-315-39862-4 (ISBN)978-1-138-22597-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-02-02Bibliographically approved
Bolin, G. & Hepp, A. (2017). The Complexities of Mediatization: Charting the Road Ahead. In: Driessens, Olivier; Bolin, Göran; Hjarvard, Stig; Hepp, Andreas (Ed.), Dynamics of Mediatization: Institutional Change and Everyday Transformations in a Digital Age (pp. 315-332). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Complexities of Mediatization: Charting the Road Ahead
2017 (English)In: Dynamics of Mediatization: Institutional Change and Everyday Transformations in a Digital Age / [ed] Driessens, Olivier; Bolin, Göran; Hjarvard, Stig; Hepp, Andreas, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 315-332Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
National Category
Media and Communications
Research subject
Critical and Cultural Theory
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:sh:diva-34023 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-62983-4_15 (DOI)978-3-319-62982-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-04 Created: 2018-01-04 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Projects
Nation branding [A063-2012_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityMedia use as value generating labour: Perceptions on the role of media use in digital media markets [P12-1278:1_RJ]; Södertörn UniversityNew Media and the Dynamics of Civil Society in the New EU Democracies: A Paired Comparison [33/2014_OSS]; Södertörn UniversityPropaganda and management of information in the Ukraine-Russia conflict: From nation branding to information war [56/2015_OSS]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0216-8862

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